Martial Arts Festival

Discussion in 'Community' started by Squire, Oct 3, 2003.

  1. Squire macrumors 68000

    Squire

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    Canada
    #1
    Hey.

    I tried to find "The Martial Arts" thread but I guess it got canned.

    I'm off to the World Martial Arts Festival tomorrow morning in the city of Chungju, Korea. I'll fill you in and maybe even post some pics. Apparently, more than 50 countries around the world are represented. It should be pretty cool.

    Have any of you seen cool martial arts demonstrations before?

    Squire
     
  2. eclipse525 macrumors 6502a

    eclipse525

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    #2
    It's funny...I've been taking Martial Arts for a while now and have seen very few demonstrations. For the exception of my own schools demo's. I would love to see more. I should look more into it.

    Enjoy your trip! I'm sure it'll be a great experience.

    ~e
     
  3. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #3
    The best demo I saw was a Belgian Aikido sensei called Christian Tissier, who gave a dynamic performance of aikido against multiple attackers, armed and unarmed over a 15 minute period, the man was awesome.

    Otherwise, I tend to enjoy courses rather than demos, the best I've attended for wow factor was with Steven Seagal in Paris some years ago, he is a force to be reckoned with up close, even if he is crap actor and firmly ensconsed up his own arse:D

    There's also an excellent instructor in Kilburn called Dave Rubens, he's lethal.
     
  4. iGav macrumors G3

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    Mar 9, 2002
    #4
    He is a big chap isn't he.... :eek: I'd try and get in first with my flyin' bunny butt kick... and then run like f**k.... :p :p :p

    I so wanna learn Aikido... but your tale of dislocated thumbs and stuff, kind of puts me off... especially as I can't do any work without functioning fingers!! :eek: :( :p
     
  5. eclipse525 macrumors 6502a

    eclipse525

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    #5
    That sounds great. I've always wanted to see or study with either Steven Seagal or Jeff Speakman. It's two different styles and they areabsolutely CRaP actors BUT are wonderful practioners. I would also like to give praise to my current Sensi Thomas Clifford of Orangeburg, NY. Although, I've been away for about little over a year due to herniated disc in my back. I can't wait to get back and continue my studies. With Martial Arts being so commericalized it's difficult to find good instructors.

    ~e
     
  6. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #6
    I find martial arts interesting. Jackie has certainly turned it into a great career. Will look forward to seeing your pictures.

    scem0 will definitely find this festival of interest.
     
  7. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #7
    I've seen a couple good demo's from some seriously intense practicioners of Kenpo Karate. One guy is an Iron Palm specialist, the other is a blacksmith who uses his fists like hammers. All against multiple attackers.

    Biggest honor so far has been to be present in class the night a fellow student took his first black belt test. It was brutal. I was quite simply in awe watching what he went through that night.
     
  8. Squire thread starter macrumors 68000

    Squire

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    #8
    I'm bringing my camcorder and my buddy's bringing his Poweshot G3. It should be interesting.

    There's a martial art called Tae-kyun (sp?) that originated in this city of Chungju. I saw a demo of it at our university once during my lunch break. I walked by and saw all these cute girls doing a dance-like performance. Cool, I thought. Then, on the way back from lunch, two big guys were going at it- judo throws combined with Taekwondo kicks. Pretty amazing. We're trying to catch a Tae-kyun performance at 10:00 so I have to get going.

    Later

    Squire
     
  9. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    back in NYC!
    #9
    Awesome!

    If you take pictures try to take some pictures of wushu demonstrations.

    I don't think there is anything more amazing then a person who can do wushu and do it well.

    scem0
     
  10. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #10
    Do it Gav, my thumbs have been dodgy for years, mainly from rugby and car accidents, well practiced aikido has less chance of injuring you than almost any martial art, but there is always a chance.

    Mind, you can wreck your hands opening a tin of beans:D
     
  11. Judo macrumors regular

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    New Zealand
    #11
    Sounds cool. Lookin foward to pics. I've just started Tai Chi this year. It's a little slow but when I watch some of the more experienced students it just looks so cool. Micheal yek is the tutor who is Professor Yeks son who is supposed to be well known, but who knows.
     
  12. eclipse525 macrumors 6502a

    eclipse525

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    #12
    Tai Chi is known as the oldest and most say the most advanced forms of Martial Arts. Best of luck with your studies.....enjoy. It sure is slow but it's the only MA that focuses on energy work which is VERY important.

    ~e
     
  13. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    #13
    Yeah, Tai Chi is a great martial art.

    I would recommend taking kung fu and tai chi at the same time..... You really see how interconnected they are, its quite amazing. Tai Chi offers a lot that kung fu can't offer, but Kung Fu offers a lot that Tai Chi can't offer. I think they are great arts and when taken together they are very powerful.

    scem0
     
  14. Squire thread starter macrumors 68000

    Squire

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    Canada
    #14
    Pics

    Sorry about being slack with the pics.

    The Hapkido team probably had the best presentation with the Korea-Wushu group a very close second. Both were amazing.

    Pics are at the URL below.

    Cheers,

    Squire


    http://homepage.mac.com/davemcguire/PhotoAlbum5.html
     
  15. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #15
    Very nice pictures Squire. Thank you for sharing. They are very colorful pictures indeed!
    :cool:
     
  16. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #16
    Very nice, I studied karate for many years in college and beyond ending up in a form called Kyokushinkai, popularly known as "knockdown karate", I wonder whether it was related to the Kyokushin in your pics, there was almost no breaking involved when I studied.
     
  17. dstorey macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 14, 2002
    #17
    I register tomorrow at The Uinveristy of Durham, and I'm thinking about joining the Aikido society but I'm not sure. Not having much money and having to pay the course fee's myself I don't want to do anything that's gonna get in the way of my studies. But then again employers always want you to have done things outside of study at university and it probably is good for the resume and to meet other people (i'll be going there knowing no one). I'm also quite interested in kendo but maybe that will be too expensive and not as useful, fencing or rowing. It's a pitty kendo and aikido arn't part of Team Durham (the uni's sports team) like Judo is....

    Is Aikido something that is fairly easy to pick up, as I'll only be there one year (masters) and who knows if I'll be in a place with a club after that.
     
  18. eclipse525 macrumors 6502a

    eclipse525

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    #18
    Aikido is a wonderful discipline. You can't look it as a course or something for the resume. Most any Martial Arts is a life style. Very positive one that will just create positive results in all parts of your life. If you stick with it, your outlook about many things will change and most likely for the better.

    Best of LUCK!

    ~e
     
  19. dstorey macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    Yeah, I'd like to do somethink to focus my energies on and that will improve my self confidence, alertness etc. I heard martial arts are good for them sort of things. However I've always been put off cause a lot of the clubs i went as a kid were often full of bigger people showing off, thinking they are really tough etc. I've never been so much of a club person either. I'm pretty interested in japan, so i'd love to do a japanese martial art. I'm not sure which are japanese though apart from kendo and aikedo. It would be pretty amazing to get taught by a japanese master....I want my own mr miargi (or however yoyu spell it ) ;) I've often fancied thai chi too, its very slow and graceful, plus its not mostly full of guys....
     
  20. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #20
    Take the Aikido dstorey, a year will tell you whether you want to stay with it. It's the most complete martial art I've ever seen, but you have to give it time, it took me 5 years to get to 1st Dan, wheras I got to that level in Karate in 2 and was working on a 3rd Dan when I quit.

    Kendo is loads of fun too, but is very expensive as you say, I did a couple of years at Uni and it complemented the aikido very well.

    Do you know what style of Aikido is practiced at Durham?

    My advice is to give it six months and see whether you like it, then another six months to get your head round it, then I guarantee you'll go looking for a club wherever you end up.:D
     
  21. dstorey macrumors 6502a

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    #21
    Thanks for all the advice.

    It doesn't seem to tell you what form it is, as far as I can tell. It says 'At the Durham University Club, we emphasise the practical aspects of Aikido, whist still maintaining the traditional principles. Our Sensei (instructor) believes very strongly that Aikido should enable you to defend yourself in real-life situations.' The Sensei is a 4th Dan. They are affiliated with White Rose Aikido (north east and yorkshire aikido clubs i think).

    the clubs web site is here http://www.dur.ac.uk/aikido.club/ (pretty basic)
     
  22. WinterMute Moderator emeritus

    WinterMute

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    #22
    OK, you are looking at a traditional club, teaching in the style of Ueshiba, the founder of Aikido, emphasis will be on circular turning and hip power to throw, with a group of techniques that will form a basis for extended use, expect to spend a lot of time getting up off the mat:D

    I practice Tomiki Aikido which is more competition orientated and is more linear and direct, emphasis is on speed and effectivness of technique, and as a result, on pain. We spend a lot of time getting up off the mat...

    I also study Daito Ryu under Dave Rubens, which is nasty stuff and emphasises the ablility to do really nasty things to people. We spend far too much time lying on the mat saying OWWWW:eek:

    Things to note: your wrists will hurt for a while, but they'll get stronger and then won't hurt at all. You'll get fitter from all the getting up off the mat...
     
  23. dstorey macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 14, 2002
    #23
    oh boy....sounds like I'm gonna be on first name terms with Matt...

    Actually I quite like the sound of a traditional style with flowing movements, sounds quite graceful.

    I guess I'll have to go through the pain barrier whhile typing up all them essays with sore wrists....
     
  24. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

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    back in NYC!
    #24
    A traditional style with flowing movements?

    This is sounding like you want to take kung fu to me (and even more like Tai Chi) ...... I can't speak for or against Aikido, having never taken it, but if you want a traditionaly style with flowing movements then one of the traditional kung fu styles would fit perfectly.

    The style with the most flowing movements would probably be crane kung fu (out of the traditional 5 animal styles).

    Personally, I want to take wushu (I quit from the place I used to take it - it was too far away) and Wing Chung.

    I want to take Wing Chung because it was developed by a woman and so it isn't about using your body mass to beat your opponent. The woman who made it (forgot her name) took into account the fact that women have more powerful hips and thighs, which I believe to be true about me. I prefer kicking to punching. Ultimately the style was made to give a small opponent a way of beating a large opponent.

    I still want to continue with kung fu though.

    scem0
     
  25. eclipse525 macrumors 6502a

    eclipse525

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    #25
    Traditional Kung Fu is a great choice if you're looking for free flowing movements. I took Long Fist for a short while and it was awesome. Just be prepared to bring your oxygen tank. Not only is it all about your form but it's a test in endurance. Whatever style you choose, visit them ALL and take all the FREE classes they offer. Great way to judge if you like the school and teacher as well. A great Martial Artist doesn't really make a great teacher. Keep that in mind.

    ~e
     

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