Messing around as Administrator

Discussion in 'macOS' started by thewhitehart, Oct 17, 2005.

  1. thewhitehart macrumors 6502a

    thewhitehart

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Location:
    The town without George Bailey
    #1
    As a new ibook user I've read a few blogs telling me I shouldn't use an admin account as my primary one; that I should make myself a standard user on my own system.

    I think this might be a good idea because yesterday I accidentally moved the mac system folder to my desktop. What would happen if I did this? Would the computer restart properly? Would other users still be able to use it? Just curious, I like messing around with stuff.

    How many people do have a seperate standard account for themselves rather than using an admin account?
     
  2. swindmill macrumors 6502a

    swindmill

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    KY
    #2
    I've always used my admin account but would also be interested in hearing thoughts on this
     
  3. slooksterPSV macrumors 68030

    slooksterPSV

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2004
    Location:
    Nowheresville
    #3
    Standard account / Admin - depends. If you do anything that requires Administrative action, on both accounts it requires confirmation from an admin, so yes you can set it up like that - although System Preferences, under Admin, are automatically enabled so you can change them. As for moving files and folder, when I created a standard account for my sister, she couldn't access the Hard drive, just applications in the Applications folder. I'm on the account I create - Admin - when I firstly installed Panther. It may be good practice if you ruin something accidently. I myself, if I ruin something I fix it up like *snap* that. It just depends on how you feel. Practice wise? I dunno.
     
  4. schatten macrumors member

    schatten

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    #4
    I don't think an admin can do any devistating damage, from my experience as an Apple technician. Even if a user has little grasp of how their system works, OS 10 will ward off any blatently dangerous mistakes.

    Now, activating & using a Root account as your normal account might be a little more dangerous. I wouldn't recommend that. That could get ugly.
     
  5. thewhitehart thread starter macrumors 6502a

    thewhitehart

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2005
    Location:
    The town without George Bailey
    #5
    I'm going into all sorts of speculation because I'm not used to having an os work as perfectly as this one does. I'm so used to windows screwing up that I'm subconsciously looking for ways to screw up my mac so I can have a reason to fix it :D

    I agree with slookster. If you're computer savvy, even as a new mac user, go ahead using the administrator account. Especially if you're familiar with unix. Even if you use an admin account, it'll ask you for a password anyway if you attempt to move something important of affect any drastic changes. The only thing I found by using an administrator account is it will not ask you for a password if you attempt to move applications out of the application folder to somewhere else. I also discovered that you cannot move the System folder in the traditional way of dragging and dropping; it will always default to making a copy. In unix terms, it will not let you move an item as an administrator if the group permissions is set to "wheel" by just simply dragging it. (Of course, you can change the permissions for group). You can move other users folders, even though you do not fall into their permissions group, but it will prompt for a password.
     
  6. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #6
    In over three years of using OS X on many different Macs, I have always used an admin account and have never screwed anything up, even while using it when tired, drunk, angry, distracted, etc.

    Perhaps I'm innately cautious. But, honestly, I think it's hard to inadvertently screw things up.

    It's probably safer to not use an admin account normally. But, for most people, I doubt it really matters.
     

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