Movie rentals via Apple TV

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by skinnylegs, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. macrumors 65816

    skinnylegs

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Location:
    San Diego
    #1
    When will they be available? I checked the other day and no go. I would check today but my place is getting painted and the crew has my a/v stuff under wraps.
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    bacaramac

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    #2
    Probably some time next week as per keynote that said two weeks.
     
  3. macrumors 601

    Yvan256

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    Since the keynote was 11 days ago, and updates/new releases are usually on tuesdays, I'd say we still have 3 more days of waiting.

    Come on, 4:3 TV support! :rolleyes: :(
     
  4. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    #4
    That would be nice. One Apple TV in my house is connected to a 4:3 HD TV and it is annoying to watch Fullscreen content on it or even to look at pictures. The Pillar and Letter boxing is ridiculous. It is only useful for widescreen content (which is great, but sometimes you need something else).
     
  5. macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #5
    They make HDTVs in a 4:3 aspect ratio?
     
  6. macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    #6
    My grandmother lives with us and she would not tolerate a Widescreen TV, so we found a 4:3 Samsung in 1080i, 27" I believe. Most of what she watches is still 4:3, so it works well. When I watch stuff it is usually 16x9.

    In short, yes, 4:3 HD TV's do exist.
     
  7. macrumors 601

    jaw04005

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2003
    Location:
    AR
    #7
    There is no such thing as a 4:3 aspect ratio HDTV. 1080i is in the 16:9 aspect ratio. Your TV may "do" 4:3, but you have black borders on the side of your 4:3 content—or you're stretching 4:3 content to 16:9.

    Update: Do you have this TV? Samsung 27" Tube HDTV, Model #: SAM TXT2793H. Despite what Samsung tries to claim, this is not an HDTV just a digital enhanced-definition TV. It may accept HD signals, but Samsung's "HDTV" marketing of this model is false advertising. It's just squeezing a 720p or 1080i signal within its limited 800x600 resolution.

    The FCC should really crack down on this type of thing.

    Check out this article,

    http://blogs.computerworld.com/node/3674
     

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