Moving from NJ to Bay area - bad idea?

Discussion in 'Community' started by radhak, Sep 1, 2004.

  1. radhak macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Location:
    NJ, USA
    #1
    I am here in the Bay area for a couple of weeks of work, and love the work culture here, and also the much more relaxed living.

    Now I have been offered this great offer to relocate (intra-company) to the Bay area. Great because the work would be more challenging and interesting, even though the salary might remain the same.

    I live in central Jersey and commute to NY. Here, I might have to live somewhere like Fremont / Dublin and commute to SF downtown.

    But a quick google tells me that it would take a good deal more money to live here than back east, and that not counting buying a house. The only thing that seems costlier in NJ is the property tax! (I rent now, but have to start thinking of buying a house or something soon. ) A friend here says, 'all that extra is what we pay for the weather'!

    So, has anybody done this - move from east to west (or vice-versa)? Any opinions?
     
  2. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

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    Jul 9, 2000
    #2
    my family and my wife's family have either lived in the bay area or the new york city area for three generations

    just about everybody agrees that there is no city that can match new york or even come close as far as good, services, job market, culture, etc

    but just about everybody i have talked to from both our families agree that nothing is as expensive as new york and surrounding areas, including new jersey areas near manhattan
     
  3. vraxtus macrumors 65816

    vraxtus

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    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #3

    It costs an arm and a leg to live in the city... however the commute (I've heard) from Dublin is long and very monotonous.

    Otherwise, I love living in SF. It's a great city with lots of things to do (usually) but since I've practically lived in the city all my life... it's getting a tad bit old :eek:
     
  4. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #4
    more...


    the bay area is one of the three best areas in the state for a good job market within california and it is better than the other two (la and san diego) when it comes to weather...i consider la and san diego a tad bit on the hot side even though jobwise, the la and san diego areas have more to offer plus they didn't get hit as hard with the dot.bomb fiasco

    the bay area is very mild most of the year and compared to la and san diego, it's not as congested for a large american metopolitan area

    as long as you don't compare san francisco to new york and take california for what it is...less congested, less cosmopolitan, less educated than nyc, then you will do fine...we do pretty well out here in the bay area and some who have not left the area often think we are as grand as nyc, london, or tokyo...but what one doesn't know, they won't miss...we don't know what real pizza, pastrami sandwiches, bbq, and cheesecake are, or what they could be ;)

    if you can, avoid san jose since it's a real eyesore and very much the armpit of the bay area, and certainly not a good representative of the usually beautiful and serene bay area in general

    as for cities, san francisco, though less than a million people, is a pretty great city for a little peninsula that is 49 square miles total...you can find a world class art gallery (sf moma), museum (deyoung), world class pier, world class law school, world class hospitals, and many other sights which are almost up to par with los angeles, chicago, or new york... stanford university and their hospital, nearby, is as good as any ivy league school, the sf opera is second tier but still very good, our sf giants are not the yankees but barry bonds is a one man show, there are some small zoos, aqauriums, and golden gate park, though small, is a nice place among all the concrete...as for concerts, there are some medium sized venues but big enough to get the big names...the restaurants beat los angeles but nobody would compare sf dining to new york but if you are careful, you can find something that is tasty and affordable...as for wine, that i can say, is where we have everyone beat except for france..we live, like i mentioned, in a mild climate so we are in an outdoor culture...he he...do not expect to find the average populace well read...

    wherever you move to in the bay area, you will find yourself missing east coast culture as all my relatives have and the only good answer is to visit new jersey/new york as often as you can and not try to make the bay area into your current home, or even a mini nyc...we are who we are and just a couple of generations removed from the wild, wild west

    i hope this helps

    ps...i would not want to live anywhere else but i know no area can have the best of everything and still be clean, safe, and uncongested
     
  5. krimson macrumors 65816

    krimson

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    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    #5
    and dont forget we're still due for the "Big One" :)
     
  6. rueyeet macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

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    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #6
    From what I recall (I always want to say "if memory serves me right" because of Iron Chef :D ) the most expensive city in the country, as far as housing goes, is actually Boston, followed closely by New York and San Francisco. So if you are anywhere in the NY area in Jersey, it's not going to be a whole lot more expensive to move to San Francisco.

    Aside of the earthquake potential, it's a beautiful city, with a very nice climate. The other thing about coastal California is that you're always either looking up at mountains, or down at water; less so in the city, but you get the drift. Also, city and all, the Northern California air is just better than the East Coast. Probably it's the relative lack of humidity, but the air just felt clearer somehow.

    San Francisco is also fairly progressive. It has an easy-going, laid-back reputation. Definitely so, in comparison to the fast-paced, always in a hurry, "I want it on my desk yesterday" DC-NY corridor. Some may say it's also a bit wacky or flaky around the edges, but that's a matter of personal preference, I guess.

    I've wanted to move to San Francisco for years, if it weren't for leaving my family behind, and monetary considerations. I envy you the opportunity.
     
  7. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #7
    actually, the odds of getting killed by a terrorist or street crime in a major east coast city is far greater than getting killed by an earthquke in california

    even the worst recorded quakes in california did not take massive human life but the movies have made it seem that way...we are not really due for one big quake, as in the ones that hit china, but a series of major 7.0+ quakes over the next few centuries...unfortunately, one big quake will not change the fact that we live on dynamic, ever changing faults and no amount of releasing pressure will keep us still forever

    no matter what, we will always be known as earthquake country and it's only the out of state people that i have seen that attach too much fear to earthquakes...tornados and hurricanes, now that is truly scary stuff and does damage to structures that no earthquake can ever do year after year
     
  8. vraxtus macrumors 65816

    vraxtus

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    Aug 4, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #8

    That's not what I see! Especially since my father is an SF (high ranked) politician...
     
  9. strider42 macrumors 65816

    strider42

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    #9
    if you ahve a choice, live on the other side of the hills, in oakland or berekley if you can't find anything in san francisco (south san francisco/daly city might have some housing that would interest you too). The weather is so much better in oakland comapred to dublin. I'm talking like a 10-15 degree difference on the hottest days. I live in Oakland and commute to the east bay by train and bus and it works great. But the further away from san francisco, generally the cheaper it gets to live. You could live out in Concord or fremont, or above berekley or something pretty cheap and take BART right into san francisco. I use to do that for work.

    check out craigslist.com for housing and what not, and to buy new stuff. great bay area resource. its in other cities too, but it started here and is there's always loads on it.

    personally, I wouldn't think twice about moving out here if I were you. I love this area. I know its not for everyone, but it is a good place to live if it fits your style.
     
  10. applemacdude macrumors 68040

    applemacdude

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    Location:
    Over The Rainbow
    #10
    Who is your father?
     
  11. krimson macrumors 65816

    krimson

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2003
    Location:
    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    #11
    awe come on, you're being too serious :)

    the first big earthquake you're in is always the worst, especially if it's a night (like northridge). I've been in tropical Typhoons before, and one F2 Tornado. They're all scary, even if you get used to it.

    Now.. a large explosive volcanic eruption, and pyroclasic flow.. that's what im scared of...
     
  12. keysersoze macrumors 68000

    keysersoze

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    NH
    #12
    Are you kidding?!? ANY reason to leave New Jersey's a GOOD reason.

    do it! do it! leave nj!

    :)
     
  13. r6girl Administrator/Editor

    r6girl

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2003
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    #13
    i moved to the bay area from baltimore. i still miss the east coast and plan to move back there some day...

    ditto on what jefhatfield described about the bay area, except on the congestion. i find it to be crowded here, most evident to me through the horrific traffic. i've lived here for almost 4 years now, and long-time residents tells me that the traffic now is way better than it used to be. well, i'm just glad i wasn't here back then, because it's already bad enough to drive me crazy. but, this may not bother you coming from new jersey...

    the cost of living is crazy, but you get used to it, oddly enough. i like the weather, proximity to the ocean, wine country, the mountains, and great roads for motorcycling. but, it still does not feel like "home" here and both my husband and i intend to move back east eventually. so, pros and cons, but nice overall. i think you should do it at least for the experience, assuming you will have a way (hopefully company-funded) to move back east some day (if, of course, you decide you don't want to stay here).

    oh, and if you end up living around fremont or dublin, find a place near a BART (bay area rapid transit - subway/train system) station. it'll be about a 1-hour ride into downtown SF (plus any connections via bus, muni, or walking you'll have to make to get to your office) - you won't have to deal with traffic and can sleep, read, or whatever. i used to work in downtown oakland and took BART every day - best way to go to avoid driving, if you don't mind dealing with the occasional crazy person every now and then! :)

    marianne
     
  14. question fear macrumors 68020

    question fear

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    The "Garden" state
    #14
     
  15. vraxtus macrumors 65816

    vraxtus

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    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #15
    City Administrator.
     
  16. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

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    Jul 9, 2000
    #16
    he he...tommy lee jones and anne heche ;)

    discovery channel had a great series on the different types of disasters...tornado, earthquake, black plague, tidal wave, asteroid, hurricane, tsunami, and volcano...and a major volcano eruption listed as the worst, least survivable...and gruesome death

    a life ending asteroid would be worse but the odds are so remote that it was crossed off the list...every several billion to several hundred billion years an asteroid big enough to distinguish life can come our way via a direct hit...we will more likely see the end of the earth through a supernova many, many, many years from now

    but in non-geological time, it's possible that a volcano can come, while there is still human life on earth, and it will make any prior disaster in human history seem minuscule

    if you are not blown up or burned to a crisp, you may have to endure the "winter" that could result from massive volcanic ash in the air dropping the earth's temperature to near absolute zero...for those of you who are not into science, that's very, very cold and ALMOST as cold as lambeau field when a promising california football team visits the packers and all these fat, male cheeseheads are out there painted in green and yellow and 3/4's naked...but that's for another thread ;)

    a volcanic eruption that is enough to end life on a continent is not something i want to be around when it happens...mount st. helens out here on the west coast was relatively minor as far as those type of eruptions go, but it packed a wallop and was thousands of times more powerful than the atomic bomb at hiroshima
     
  17. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #17
    i follow sf politics...was it that man, no name mentioned for privacy, that ran for mayor who was of chinese descent?

    sf has the most colorful history when it comes to mayors...what do you think about the high profile mayor now? or the even higher profile mayor that used to run your city?

    sf mayor can lead to congressperson, senator, governor, or even a higher office and for a city less than a million people, it's amazing how much power your mayor can yield statewide and eventually nationwide

    i predict willie brown will run for president someday...he's so politically savvy though some say ruthless...either way, he's not finished and we will see more of him

    i grew up with a couple of guys whose dad was congressman in our district, then became chief of staff for a president in the white house...two of the kids became lawyers and one a doctor...there seems to be so much pressure on the three boys to do something politically but political office is not something that is automatically inherited most of the time...it will be interesting to see what happens over the course of many years
     
  18. radhak thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Location:
    NJ, USA
    #18
    Wow! That's a wealth of info. Thanks everyone. I mentioned Fremont/Dublin because thats where some of my colleagues live, so good to know of more options like Oakland/Berkeley.

    coming from Jersey, the traffic here is like butter. i am always asking, 'when does it get really congested? ;) And I was taken aback when the girl at the post office smiled, said 'hi', and even had a joke ready. I guess NJ/NYC makes you inured to abrupt behaviour.

    talking of disaster prone, after 9/11 and 'The Day After Tomorrow', NYC is not very cuddly either...:eek:

    btw, i am also amazed at the number of people i have seen with Apple products on the street, or even public transport : PB, iBook or iPod. Of course, having an Apple store right in front helps! I was able to check out the new iMac the day it was released. (found it great, but not for me : i like the huge swivel-flexibility of my 'old' machine).
     
  19. vraxtus macrumors 65816

    vraxtus

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    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #19

    No, my father's position is appointed, but he essentially covers nearly all the departments that Gavin doesn't explicitly manage. Personally I think Gavin is doing well for the city, and his move for gay marriage was very politically smart, and though many were in disagreement with him it certainly got his name out there. From what I *hear* he has some trouble making decisions, but that's most likely attributed to his youth... he *is* only 35 after all, almost half the age of Willie.
     
  20. krimson macrumors 65816

    krimson

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    Location:
    Democratic People's Republic of Kalifornia
    #20
    Damn that La Brea tar pit.. it's always causing trouble. It's kinda funny if you visit The Grove Apple Store... there's methane/gas sensors everywhere. Even in those new apt complexes across the street.

    I was thinking the Volcano near Sea-Tac.. can't remember the name now for some reason. Rainer?...
    and maybe Yellowstone... the cauldera seems to be rising at a good pace now.. it's very possible we could see that one blow within (late) our lifetimes, or our childrens lifetime. Even the Mammoth Valley cauldera popping it's top would cause massive problems.

    It's probably because I haven't been thru one yet... like the first few large earthquakes were pretty scary, as was the tornado.. the typhoon (taiwan) wasn't too bad because we were in the city and 3 floors up, and nowhere near a muddy mtn.

    But all natural disasters are bad..

    -------
    back to california... im thinking SF isn't as expensive as it used to be, ya know.. at the height of the "1st tech boom". I think it's dropped down on the list since the bubble popped.
     
  21. rueyeet macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

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    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #21
    The political sphere is NEVER laid-back, as a rule--no matter the location. But it's also not going to be the experience of the average Joe without political connections.

    I think the thing I'd miss most, moving to California, would be the East Coast spring and fall: the cherry trees in bloom in April, and the trees ablaze with colors in the fall. A friend of mine studying in Santa Cruz said that the lack of really distinct seasons got to her after awhile. Though, I don't think I'd miss the dog days of August or the deep freeze of February.... :p
     
  22. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #22
    did you see that surfer out there in hurricane frances? i guess some big wave riders see this disaster as an opportunity...out here on the west coast there aren't storms that big as often and the waves, big ones, are not that common...i took my wife to maverick's near santa cruz and it was flat and some surfers here wish we had something big come our way to pump up the surf spots

    i am sure they would change their mind if they had to hit shelters several times a year and spend a considerable amount of money fixing damage...i wonder how all those people go to the bathroom when a storm like that hits and thousands are in shelters, which according to cnn, are the only things open in some areas

    the storm out in florida is reported to be the size of texas
     
  23. King Cobra macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    #23
    Replace "New Jersey" with "Maine" and "nj" with "me," and you'd be right on.

    Not to mention, you're talking about a place in which we used to live, before we were sorta forced to move to our current s***hole. Contrary to what people think, New Jersey has plenty of friendly and far more informative, active, organized, and intelligent people. It is (last time I checked: 2 years ago) also the 4th highest state to receive an education. (Coincidence?) It is a bit expensive to live in, but had you paid attention to the increase of costs of living along the southeastern edges of Maine, you would be better off selling something up there to move down to NJ. The problems with Maine are numerous, such as the abundancy of rednecks!!! :mad: and their irratic, over-the-white-line, and car cut-off driving, as well as the lack of money going into (and staying in) the state, even with tourism being their number one business. (Very sad, I know.) Plus, in NJ, if you hired 10 people to do a different job for you on time and on schedule, 9 of them would pull through. In Maine, maybe 5 of them would.

    Anytime somebody starts talking some nasty s*** about New Jersey, I get this sudden urge to bite into somebody's neck. Hence, the above rant and that feeling you have about your hair and ceiling almost kissing.


    Back on topic, I don't agree with the postulate of moving for the sake of a business opportunity and nothing else. You would need to take time to get used to the new area and house. Unless you are seriously dedicated and willing to move everything over there over long distances back and forth over a long period of time (and that determination is up to you), then it's probably better to stay where you are. Also, do some additional research on what others have thought about moving from one place to another for the sake of business opportunities. See if you can come up with about 20 pages of feedback, particularly opinions, experiences, problems, rewarding opportunities, etc. from others online, in order to help you establish stronger relations as to how difficult/rewarding/etc. the move would be.
     
  24. theonenonlyjoey macrumors member

    theonenonlyjoey

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    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #24
    i moved from NJ to the bay area in 1999. im soo ready to go back. bad bad drivers. horrible food. weather is the only plus point. but im more of a fan of 4 seasons anyway. my family is conostantly having the family in jersey ship us food because we miss it so much.
     
  25. Neserk macrumors 6502a

    Neserk

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    #25
    I lived an hour West of Philly for about 12 years. Now I live in Southern California. The income goes up with the cost of housing. HAving lived on both coasts I'd say move west. You couldn't pay me enough to live on the East coast again!
     

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