Moving to Paris.....suggesstions?

Discussion in 'Community' started by sethypoo, May 1, 2004.

  1. sethypoo macrumors 68000

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    Sacramento, CA, USA
    #1
    I'm seriously considering going to Paris or England (London area) during the Fall semester of my Junior year of college for a "semester abroad."

    I was wondering if there are any MacRumors members out there who have been in a exchange program like this, and if they can give me any information at all about leaving America (California to be exact) and going to a foreign country.

    Power outlets- do I need special adapters?
    What are some good colleges in the area?
     
  2. sethypoo thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #2
    To add:
    What are some top-notch exchange programs to go with?
     
  3. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #3
    You'll need 220 adapters, IIRC.

    As to other research, I'd search both the Dept. of State and Education websites.
     
  4. sethypoo thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #4
    Thanks.

    I assume that those said adapters work in France and England?
     
  5. IrishGold macrumors member

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    May 1, 2004
    #5
    Go to England.

    Trust me on this.
     
  6. trebblekicked macrumors 6502a

    trebblekicked

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    #6
    i worked on a cultural exchange with a french theatre festival for two summers. best time of my life. i spent a decent amount of time in the UK, too, and although it was pretty cool, it couldn't hold a candle to france.

    my recommendation is find an exchange program that gets you outside of paris. a couple of nice places you should look into are Rennes and Quimper. very cool cities in bretagne. Not to say Paris is bad. It has a reputation for being snooty, but i think that's just typical american french-bashing.

    what do you study?
     
  7. IrishGold macrumors member

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    #7
    You haven't been there lately then.
    I wouldn't make it apparent that your American more than you have to.
     
  8. trebblekicked macrumors 6502a

    trebblekicked

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    #8
    does within the last year count?

    all the time i spent in france, i've never felt like a "victim" of an anti-americanism. whenever i talk politics in france i get the feeling they don't like our foreign policy very much, but does that change the way they feel about me as an individual? no. they'll still bum me a cigarette or pick up the next round. they're good people.
     
  9. IrishGold macrumors member

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    #9
    Guess I just had a different experience then.

    Maybe its because Im from the South and use to a more friendly culture, but I got a very rude vibe while I was there.
     
  10. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #10
    France is more "different" than London is to anything in the US, so you'll get the most culture shock from living in France (I'm assuming that's what you want...... a completely different experience). So yes, I think France is what YOU should do.

    However, I feel that France is only a great place ..... to visit. I lived in London, and it was the best experience of my life. But I think France is the different experience you'd want if you're going to visit a place for 4 months or so.

    And don't live outside of Paris if you don't know any french, despite what others here have said. Living in a small french town may be a bit too rough since people outside of the major touristy cities rarely speak english. Others may have had a different experience, but generally it WILL be a problem.
     
  11. medea macrumors 68030

    medea

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    #11
    abstract: I'm sorry but all areas outside of France are not small rural French towns, that is like saying all areas outside of New York are small rural U.S. towns.

    sethypoo: Go to Borders (or whatever bookstore) and check out this book I was looking through a while ago, it's called Living, Studying and Working in France, here is an amazon link http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...f=sr_1_1/102-0246729-2186575?v=glance&s=books . I am sure if you choose the U.K. instead there are plenty of similar books for there as well. One thing you need to research is the legal system, check out http://www.frenchentree.com/ as they have a legal & taxes section as well as other information. Good luck with your decision.
     
  12. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    #12
    when paris and london, there is a lot of things to do and see either place.

    sure england is different from american culture, but nothing beats france if you want a true foreign experience

    food especially. :)

    trust me on this, iv lived in all three countries.
     
  13. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #13

    Outside of New York City, people would still speak mainly english. Outside of Paris, people aren't as likely to speak english. I was discussing the possible language barrier that may be magnified if he were to live in a small town outside of Paris. Someone who only speaks Mandarin may be much better off living in New York City rather than "_____" County, which is actually true. Change what I said about NYC and change it to Paris, and its still true. It'll be easier for him to survive on english alone (and possibly survival-level french) if he lives in Paris, or any touristy city that's large.

    By referring to something "outside of Paris", I should have said, "outside of Paris or a touristy city", so that was my mistake. I guess if someone that demanded every post to be precisely worded and proofread were to read my post, s/he may be slightly confused and cloud the entire purpose of my previous thread by replying with a statement that summarized the main point of my message quite erroneously. I hope nobody else took my post the wrong way.

    I'll try not to resort to sarcasm next time, either...
     
  14. zamyatin macrumors regular

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    #14
    I went to Beijing for a semester in college; it was fun. Financially, it was great because everything in China is amazingly cheap! I did not have to take any student loans that semester. I spent about $1500 on airline tickets, and maybe $3,000 on everything else combined. My housing cost $2 per night, restaurant meals were about $1, and the food carts sold lunches for $0.50. You can get all the knockoff North Face down jackets, pirated music CDs for a dollar, great big Mao-style overcoats, and all the kitsch you could ever desire!

    If China's not on your radar, though, a trip to Europe would be great. I can't help you with the choice between England and France, but I bet you'd have a good time in either one.
     
  15. sethypoo thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #15
    I'm going for a PhD in child Psychology with an emphasis on counseling.

    Thank you all so much for your help! I checked with my univeristy I'm currently attending in the USA: they have no programs going to England whatsoever, and their France semester abroad program is for French language majors primarily.

    I think I'm leaning toward England right now: there's nothing saying I can't take a train/plane to France for a weekend getaway! :)

    My schedule is such that I can't really fit in a lot of foreign language classes, so England might work since, well, they speak English there last time I checked.
     
  16. sethypoo thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #16
    Nah, China is not on my radar for a place to live for a semester, but I am definatly going to vacation/visit there sometime in my life.

    Jeez, $2 a night for your room? $1 for dinner?!?

    Thank you for the tip on the book.....I will definatly be stopping into my local Borders soon.
     
  17. IrishGold macrumors member

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    #17
    You will love it in England...

    Find you a hot blonde girl with a nice body and that accent

    .....oh dear god....yes! I might just join you :D

    Screw studying :p
     
  18. Mav451 macrumors 68000

    Mav451

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    #18
    Very very true. You can get a massive bowl of noodles for maybe $1-2, and it will probably be better than whatever you've had in the US (especially if you've only been to "Americanized" restaurants). And of course, they got A & J there too (got a few places in MD :) )

    Why am i talking bout food and going OT? I dunno :)

    *Ah, yeah England may be best if you don't wanna learn another language...I actually know a few guys from class considering going to England as well (but they are Undergrads).
     
  19. sethypoo thread starter macrumors 68000

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    #19
    What kind of immunizations are required these days to travel abroad? As far as I know, I'm up to date on everything that's been required here in the USA.
     
  20. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #20
    Going from the USA to England....not much. You may want to get your Hepatitis A and/or B shot. One of them is important if you're going to eat seafood. I think I got it before I moved to England, but that's all I got. If you're likely to eat seafood in another country, its recommended. Canada is in the lowest risk group for Hep B (or A) so I never needed to get it, but I don't think the UK is "only" in the low risk group, not the lowest risk group. However, seeing as how you're going to a first world country, I don't see much of a problem if you're to move there as long as you have all the 'standard' shots and don't eat at any dodgy restaurants. Hep B isn't a standard immunization in Canada.
     

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