My HTC ONE Journey

Discussion in 'Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices' started by onthecouchagain, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. onthecouchagain, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013

    macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #1
    HISTORY

    Former owner of iPhone 5, Nexus 4, Galaxy Nexus, iPhone 4S. After having problems with defective Nexus 4's, I went with the iPhone 5 because I wasn't initially impressed with either the S4 or the One. The lenient Apple return policy also afforded me time to make my decision. The jailbroken iPhone 5 actually came close to being a keeper to tie me over until more options came out later in the year, but its instability and the 4" screen couldn't prevail. I had to make a decision.

    Ultimately, HTC's amazing offers and value pushed me toward pre-ordering the One. Here are my thoughts...


    THOUGHTS

    First, let's get the bad stuff out of the way...


    -A lot of Sense makes no sense

    I could give you example after example, like how you can only configure the dock icons from the app drawer, or how if you want to bring an icon from the app drawer to a home screen, you have to drag it up to the "Shortcut" button and then drag it back down to a home screen. Or how the App Switcher only shows nine apps, and if you swipe one away, it shows eight. Where's the tenth opened app? Who knows! You just get 8 out of 9 with one blank. Swipe more away, more blanks. The App Switcher also does weird things like separate out certain Settings into their own separate "app" so it wastes more space:

    [​IMG]

    Why are the Settings, Network Settings, APNs all separated? And yes, believe you me, I had more than 10 apps opened, but because I swiped some away, I get blanks. Maybe this is Sense's way of managing the RAM? I also find the App Switcher strangely cumbersome to use. It squeezes things into a small tile and too often it's hard to tell what app is what. I find myself having to really look for the app I'm trying to switch to, instead of just recognizing it right away.

    There are other examples. Like if you launch an app from the App Drawer, when you hit the Home button, it takes you back to the App Drawer. That's just bizarre. If you want to go home to an actual HOME screen, you have to tap Home again.

    The question comes down to this: Why would you make Android harder to use than it is? For example, being unable to change your wallpaper from the homescreen (a standard Android feature as far back as I can remember) or the aforementioned issues make no sense. Again, why make things that used to be easier harder and more roundabout to do? Some of these things may not be a big deal (because who changes their wallpaper that often, right?) but others make for a frustrating experience.

    The lack of toggles as a standard feature in the pull down menu makes Sense feel behind the competition. Lack of 4.2 also means no single-finger notification expansion either (it requires two fingers, which was a mistake of 4.1 even when it was on stock Android that Google saw to fix right away). And apps like DashClock Widget, one of the most popular and useful apps, isn't compatible because 4.1 doesn't support lockscreen widgets. So when will we get 4.2? Great question. Maybe June when the rumored M4 comes with JB 4.2?

    And lastly, the persistent on-screen menu button bar is ugly, obtrusive, a waste of space, and unremovable. It's puzzling how HTC forgot to keep the configurable back button to long press as the menu button. This oversight reeks of carelessness. But they have an opportunity to amend this. Just include it with the 4.2 update. It's up to them to deliver on this. The on-screen menu button pushes third party keyboards (like Swiftkey) up. And it is sometimes there even when there is already a software dedicated menu button from the app. Strange!

    [​IMG]

    As for Blinkfeed, it's okay. I give HTC props for trying something different, but they should have given people the option to remove it. What if someone likes Sense 5 but doesn't like Blinkfeed? It becomes wasted space, then -- bloatware at its worse; right on a home screen and impossible to remove. If you don't use it, it just sits there with ugly blank tiles. Not to mention I could have a far less obtrusive and, more importantly, a better experience with Flipboard. BlinkFeed really should have been optional.

    Ultimately, after a couple of days of being driven nuts by Sense, I had to switch launchers. I went with Nova Launcher, you know, where things actually make sense and Android is allowed to be what it's supposed to be. There were a few impressive things about Sense, but it's the sense-less things that ultimately hurt the experience.



    -There's no beating around the bush: The home button configuration sucks

    And it sucks even more--like salt on a wound--by the fact that it's been confirmed that the HTC logo is an area that does register touch:



    So, why not, HTC? Really, does anyone know the answer to why they went with this configuration? Has there been any [good] explanation?

    It would have been symbolic, too... HTC is home.

    Or, even better, why not go gesture base like Blackberry has with the Z10? That would have been special. But instead, they put the home button on the right, and for some reason or another, the touch point is either too small or not sensitive enough because it's easy to either miss the home button or just not get a response (it's hard to tell which it is). There are way too many times where I have to hit it again to get it going. The location of it doesn't help with aiming either because you're angling your thumb in such an awkward way.

    This is made worse when trying to access the App Switcher, which requires two taps of the Home button. If you miss it the first time or it otherwise doesn't register, you're tapping at least four times just to "quickly" switch apps. Or sometimes it'll only register one of your two taps and it takes you to the home screen instead. Frustrating.

    At the end of the day, some will hate it, some will be indifferent, after all, Android devices in the past have had the home button in different places. But maybe that's precisely my point. Those were Androids of the past and I can't help but feel that HTC took a step back in time. There's just no beating around the bush on this one; HTC made a bizarre decision with the home button configuration and there are negative consequences.



    -The camera is mediocre

    HTC's gamble with 4MP Ultrapixels is, in my opinion, not going to pay off. I've tweaked the settings, I've done a factory reset, I've cleaned my camera glass (by the way, it's a little annoying that it's positioned so low. And when my index finger reaches across the back to hit that out of reach power button it causes smears so I'm constantly wiping to make sure the glass is clean. Annoying).

    I've done all I could, but the camera just doesn't deliver in the ways I'd hope it would. The pictures are grainy, noisy, lack color and honestly, the low light stuff isn't even that impressive. It's nice, but even so, everything else is a compromise.

    Smartphones have constantly been striving to replace standard pocket cameras and for the most part they've reached that level. Then to read that the One's camera is meant best for "Facebook, Instagram or email" quality pictures feels like a big leap backwards. The 4 megapixels really do matter and you'll be thinking about it in every shot. There's no getting around it. Zoe and some of the other features are really cool, but what's the point if the resolution and quality aren't the best it could be? The Gallery is alive with moving pictures, but what's the point if the pictures aren't impressive?

    By the way, the Gallery is cool when it comes alive, but stupidly designed navigation-wise. Also, on the first level in the Gallery, you are forced to have a "Friends" section which links to your Facebook friends. So if you're signed into Facebook, it bombards your Gallery with your friend's pics. It's completely obnoxious that they force this mess on you. But if you're not signed into Facebook, it's just an ugly long gray empty bar. I've researched it and as far as I know, there's no way to be signed into Facebook and opt out of that Friends gallery (even if all your Facebook syncs are off). Big thumbs down for this. Sharing is a little weird, too. It's not a biggie but you have to pick where you want to share it to first, then select the pictures. Feels backwards.

    I think there will be two camps here. People who think HTC made the right choice by bucking the megapixel trend and trying something unique, and people who think the compromises aren't worth it. How often do you take shots in the dark or in low light? Can flash solve that problem for you? Are you willing to compromise almost everything else to have good low-light shots? These are the questions to ask to see which camp you fall under.

    I would not have minded if they just gave us a solid 13 MP camera. There would've been nothing wrong with that. It is what it is and I apparently don't have the latest camera software, so I'm hoping things will get better. Either way, it's another waiting game with HTC.



    -Lack of AWS HSPA+ is a shame for T-Mobile users

    This phone is unlocked meant for all GSM carriers, except the one it works on ideally is AT&T because it supports all their bands. For T-Mobile, it supports only HSPA (21 MB/s) and LTE, and doesn't support HSPA+ (42 MB/s) which is what the LTE network falls back to if it should not find LTE.

    In NYC HSPA is refarmed but not always reliable. You walk remotely into a building, you lose service or it drops to EDGE/2G. In a car moving? It gets intermittent service. It's sad to still see "E" on a 2013 super smartphone. Some of this is T-Mobile's fault, some of this is HTC's fault. If HTC included the AWS HSPA+ band, it would've covered more ground.

    I am optimistic T-Mobile's network will get better when they light up LTE in the summer. For now, be aware if you're buying the unlocked/Developer's Edition from HTC for use on Tmo.



    Onto some of the a-little-less-sucky stuff...


    -Battery life is good enough

    I do almost the same thing on my morning commute. The commute is almost the same distance and time-wise. A little email, a text or two, Flipboard, and browsing the web, then a game or two if the news is slow. When I get into my office, that's usually how I gauge how the battery life fares. It's not scientific, but that's the only time I can do a consistent comparison. Then I see how it goes for the rest of the day.

    The One comes in at around the 85% mark. This is not bad, but I wish it was better. For comparison's sake, the iPhone 5 would come in at around 92-94%... The Nexus 4 around 86-88%... and the Galaxy Nexus in at low 90s. Of course, all those phones had their later and more refined software running. So hopefully it'll get better for the One in the future?

    It seems to have good standby time. If I don't use my phone for a few hours and pick it up later, the percentage drops maybe 1% or so. As for the rest of the day, with moderate use, it seems to make it into the evening. I've come home with ~30% around 7PM.

    Overall, I think the battery is serviceable. It definitely could be better and I do find myself sometimes minding it more than I want to -- as in, thinking about it or making sure I keep an eye on it. Maybe software updates will improve the battery efficiency down the line. One can hope. For now, it's good enough, and shouldn't be a deterrent from getting this device. For HTC, this is a huge compliment.


    -Yeah, the power/wake button is a little hard to reach.

    But it's not as bad as it was when I had the HTC One X, which I think is where most of my fears about it came from. I still disagree with HTC for their stubborn insistency on placing the power/wake button at the top of their devices. I've said this a million times: as devices get larger, it just makes more sense to place such an important button where it's more readily and easily reachable. I shouldn't have to do any sort of stretching or shuffling to reach it. This is the only button to access your device and without proper widgets/apps the only button to sleep your device too. Why put it out or reach? Nokia, LG, Sony, Samsung, and others have figured it out. (And please don't bring up the IR blaster. No one said the IR blaster had to be the same as the power/wake button.) Don't know why HTC is so stubborn about this. They clearly must have thought about it, but think they're still making the right decision to put it on top. Look at the Droid DNA. Top-center power/wake button. Not an IR Blaster.

    While there is shuffling involved in one handed use, thankfully, thanks to the ergonomics of the One, it's relatively manageable. Your mileage may vary, of course. Also, ironically, being so far left makes it just a hair easier to reach with the right hand index finger (than say top right like the HTC One X); the distance is less to "travel" so to speak for the right hand index finger.

    Some other minor annoyances involving the location of the power button: The camera glass easily gets smudged when the index finger is reaching up to it. I find myself wanting to use two hands to hit the button more than I want to. And I do find myself inadvertently hitting the volume keys sometimes when I reach up for the power button just like some reviews have warned. It's a little frustrating. I think it's ironic that I'm doing that with this configuration because that's people's defense for the power/wake button on top; so you don't accidentally hit the volume rockers. I've never accidentally hit the volume rockers on a device that had both the volume rockers and power/wake buttons on the sides (opposite). But I'm doing it with the One. Go figure.

    Overall, it's not as disastrous as I thought it would be, but its location still doesn't make sense and is cumbersome to use. HTC, stop being so stubbron about this and get with the program.


    -Kind of bizarre the USB port is off-center at the bottom. But whatever. Sort of gets in the way when you're using it with your right hand while it's charging. Plus, I imagine it could be annoying for people who already own certain types of docks.


    -Notification Light, how I missed thee! But wish you could do more. I love me my notification lights and HTC made this one subtle and placed it cleverly. I just wish it had more usable colors. Also, when charging, there's a consistent red light that stays on, which is fine, but then it doesn't blink or change colors or anything when I get notifications. Weird.




    Onto things I like...


    -BoomSpeakers seriously rock! Not only do the front facing speaker grills give the device an edgy and aggressive look, they function wonderfully too. You really just have to experience a call on speaker phone for yourself, or Google Navigation in the car, or just playing games/music from the device to really understand how awesome it is. Also, the music quality in general is superb. Music sounds great through the earphones. Tons better than it ever did on the iPhone 5. The One overall is a real audio pleasure.


    -It's hard not to fall in love with the design. This has already been discussed to death. It looks great, feels great, and is fun to show off. It really is what the iPhone 5 should have been. The ergonomics also make the device feel great in the hand. It's a lot narrower than I thought it was, and I think that helps.

    As for build quality, it feels sturdy and seems well built, but only time will tell if it's just all looks or actually is well built. I sure hope it stands the test of time. I worry about the chamfered edges. And the inability to repair the device easily (or repair it at all?) is worrisome for the future.

    I'm using the device with a clear skin on the back, and a generic static screen protector on front. The skin protector is barely noticeable, and I love it:

    [​IMG]



    -4.7 inch screen and quality is picture perfect. Screen size, the crispness, the way things look and pop... just everything about the screen is perfect. That's all there is to say. I also personally love that it's 4.7 inches. It makes reaching across the screen a little easier. Not going with the fashionable 5" screen is one "bucking of the trend" that I actually commend HTC for.


    -IR Blaster is pretty nifty. It works very well with my TV and Cable Box. Just a handy and convenient feature to have for those times you have your device in hand and the remote is out of reach. NOTE: This doesn't mean it should be the power/wake button. Neat idea, but I still stand by my feelings about the power/wake button being on top as 100% unnecessary.






    DECISION TIME

    I think it comes down to this: The HTC One is a little bit of the best of both worlds from Apple and from Google... with just a touch from Apple's bad side in some respects with Sense forcing certain things on you... and just a touch from Google's bad side in some respects with the average camera.

    It's also amazing to me how a few key decisions can mar an otherwise good experience. The home configuration button just makes no sense. I don't now how else to put it. And it affects more than just the look and feel. It affects how you use the App Switcher, it affects how you use Google Now. It affects how you use the very home button itself.

    Likewise, the camera gamble is a big mistake. Maybe the biggest. There's just too many compromises. This is probably the hardest thing to reconcile about this device. This might improve over the next camera software update, though.

    Having said all that... I have to admit I am pretty enamored by the One. I won't say it's a keeper until I give the S4 a shot, but I will say I want it to be a keeper. Hopefully HTC will stay in the game with future updates; they will have to prove that they will support their own flagship product with timely and meaningful updates. So far, the fact that they're mum about 4.2 is deservedly worrisome.

    Lastly, I won't deny value playing a big part in me wanting to keep this device. The 64GB dev edition is only $650 unlocked and I LOVE having 64GB. Factor in HTC's wonderful trade-in program which will get me back $100 for an old Blackberry Curve that was otherwise just gathering dust and you have a real bargain. They threw in a free case for the delay and free overnight shipping, too. All in all, I spent exactly $549 (tax free) to get one of the biggest smartphones of 2013 with 64GB. You can't beat nor ignore that. It's difficult to ignore what's coming later this year too. If I should, say for example, want the Moto Phone X or the 2013 Nexus, I'll feel much better about spending $550 dollars to have used the One for less than a year. Plus, with 64GB, the resale value would be higher, too. All these considerations will be major factors in my decision.

    And because T-mobile delayed the S4 launch, I don't think I'll be able to get the device in hand to do a real side by side comparison in time (HTC only gives you 14 days). I may just have to pick out some time and use a live floor display model to compare. This is good news for the One and unfair to the S4, but that's Samsung's fault for the delay. These are circumstances beyond my control. I'll update in this thread my S4 impressions when I can.

    For now, my journey with the One looks like it'll continue even if I think HTC made some flat-out stupid and senseless decisions here and there.

    HTC, I'm rooting for you.
     
  2. onthecouchagain, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013

    thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #2
    EDIT: The Dev Edition and the 32GB Unlocked HTC ONE from HTC's own website DOES support T-Mobile's LTE on the AWS band. It doesn't say it, but AWS is 1700/2100 MHz. That'll give you Tmo's LTE when it's lit up in your area.
     
  3. onthecouchagain, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013

    thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #3
    EDIT: The Dev Edition and the 32GB Unlocked HTC ONE from HTC's own website DOES support T-Mobile's LTE on the AWS band. It doesn't say it, but AWS is 1700/2100 MHz. That'll give you Tmo's LTE when it's lit up in your area.
     
  4. macrumors regular

    Garen

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles Area
    #4
    That is what I did I returned my unlock 32G for T-Mobile version it was the right decision and I think you should do it if you'll be using it on T-Mobile network. Shame on HTC selling unlock phones that only can fully be used on ATT network.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #5
    Where are you, if you don't mind my asking? NYC? And if so, is the coverage much much better with LTE than with only HSPA?

    It's frustrating that it's not even HSPA+. Just standard HSPA.

    HTC sucks for doing this.
     
  6. MRU, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013

    MRU
    macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #6
    Feck Me bud ! Wasn't expecting that :eek: :)


    I knew what you would find troublesome, but hey look at my situation now. I'm here not 'anticipating' the delivery of my S4, but almost 'fearing' it.

    Memory management / Lag / Touchwiz / Build materials (as opposed to build quality) and yet I'm going to give it a chance simply because I have the opportunity to do so.

    If I can't get on with the S4, in all likelihood I'll be back onto the HTC One in 14 days and I'll buy a cheap digital camera to stick in the car when I want better picture quality from a camera (rather than just snapping for social media).

    The design of the One is I have no doubt going to be seen in years to come as a classic (yes all classics are flawed in some way). It is a beautiful device and that screen is amazing. The way the black just dissapears into the bezel top and bottom.

    At least you have a dev phone. You can guarantee you will be able to load up a custom rom which will address most of your issues including using the centre button for something.


    Actually I'm surprised at the speediness they are rolling out the 1.29 camera / software fixes update in Europe to not only sim free unbranded handsets, but to carrier handsets too. Normally carriers handsets are left straggling behind, but in this instance its only been at most 5 days. That's surprisingly refreshing and leaves me hopeful.

    I imagine they wont just push out 4.2 for updating sakes, they will want to add or refine some of sense too. More blinkfeed integration with apps, more sources for news etc.. Just updating to 4.2 for the sake wont bring that many extra benefits.

    So you might see JB 4.2.2 update & Sense 5.0.1 or some such I suspect.
     
  7. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    #7
    Why do Americans have to pay so much less for electronics? Seriously, 550 for 64gb!

    there is only one store here in Germany offering that version for 770 €!

    which is around a 1000 USD!

    which is almost double that what you paid!

    this $ = € parity in electronics has to stop. i feel like we subsidize your phones, they seriously cannot be making a profit in the US with those prices.

    edit: read today that with the upcoming 4.2.2 update the 3 dot menu will disappear.

    edit 2: im getting my one tomorrow - i also fear the mediocre camera, im seriously wondering how brian klug of anandtech got such great results, the "real users" seem to contradict his views 180 °
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    #8
    Taxes, transportation duties, and tariffs.
     
  9. onthecouchagain, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013

    thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #9
    I may switch to a tmobile version. I didn't realize the unlocked one from HTC doesn't support lte on tmobile. It's a really stupid situation. I lose 32gb and direct updates from HTC. Kind of annoyed.

    But I feel coverage and data speeds (something used every day) is more important.
     
  10. MRU
    macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #10
    Annoying but if you need those LTE speeds / support 32gb is not too much of a trade off unless you have loads of stuff on your handset.
     
  11. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    #11
    i dont think its that simple. i dont know the exact import duties the eu charges or the us, but believe they are not drastically different. ok we get 19 % vat on top, but usually the us states have vat as well, maybe not as high.

    transportation costs are of negligible difference im sure.

    still doesnt explain the huge price difference. maybe the us citizens have a much lower median disposable income than the eu ones, but i doubt it.
     
  12. macrumors regular

    Garen

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles Area
    #12
    I'm in Los Angeles BTW T-Mobile has 30 days remorse buyer program and so far with exception of Pasadena which my I5 on ATT is getting 70 down and 25 up TM has bested the ATT without the LTE. The HTC is getting between 5 to 16 down and up to 4.5 up in my work area (La Crescenta, CA).
     
  13. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    #13
    Ok to make things easier look at this.

    http://www.dutycalculator.com/help_center/example-calculation-import-duty-and-taxes-for-a-set-of-golf-clubs/
     
  14. johnjefferson, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2013

    macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2013
    #14

    I have also seen you posting in the HTC One thread about not liking the battery or the camera plus what you listed above. Thats a lot of complaining for someone who said just a few days ago "I can't tell you how happy I am to be back on Android. It's like waking up from a bad nightmare. Almost everything is so much better and easier on Android. It's such a liberating feeling." Sure about that? :)
     
  15. bmac4, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013

    macrumors 68020

    bmac4

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta Ga
    #15
    So after your first week or so with the phone do you feel like this is a phone you could keep? I know you had a messed up nexus 4, and the iPhone 5 screen was just too limiting. So is this phone enough to make you keep it? I know you are not a big fan of the camera either, but you did like the galaxy nexus (which I have to say was one of my favorite phone of all time), but it did not have a good camera either. Can you look past that and still like the phone?
     
  16. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    #16
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2011
    #17
    Don't feel alone..Australia is one of the biggest ripoff countries in the world. Having said that, the HTC One is still cheaper here than what you're paying.
     
  18. thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #18
    ... um, okay. I'm not sure what your point is.
     
  19. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #19
    Just install nova launcher and all the things you hate about Sense will be gone.

    From what i've seen, the camera seems really good, compared to other cameras, even the iphone 5. Yes, the daytime camera is 'worse', but that's only if you're zooming into the picture for 1:1 pixels on your screen or you're printing out a poster. Nobody really does that. If i view the photo full screen, i really don't see the difference.

    Low light photo making makes a huge dfference and the One beats everyone else's pants off.
     
  20. thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #20

    Nova launcher is a godsend. In some ways, it's better than stock Android. This is how "skins" should be. It should add more features and make things easier. Nova does exactly that.
     
  21. bmac4, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2013

    macrumors 68020

    bmac4

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta Ga
    #21
    Since Couch did not decide to reply to me I will ask you. You seemed to like the HTC One a bit more that he did. Do you think the One will be you long term phone? Did you like it enough to make it you main phone for a while?
     
  22. MRU, Apr 27, 2013
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2013

    MRU
    macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #22
    Here is the dichotomy. A long term phone for me in the past few years is one that lasts 6 months....

    But I know what you are asking and honestly if I didn't have the ability to flit around with phones then yes I'd be happy if I had to settle down with one phone only and if that was the HTC One yep, i'd be content.

    It seriously is a beautiful handset with a lot of future potential in the choices HTC has made with it.

    I think features like blinkfeed which ok is limited at the moment, with proper developer support it could be a genuine game changer. Imagine not only RSS, but your other apps utilising it too. Instagram updates, movie reviews, sports results etc.... It could be a great hub and a really neat way of aggregating your daily app usage into an easily accessible overview.

    The HTC One is the first Android handset that I have had NO lag or performance issues, or even needed to consider memory management and 32GB or 64GB goes a long way to justify no micro SD slot.

    I love the fact that they have 'rethought' the app drawer and made it more personal. The fact if you wanted you could do away with home screens and just have blinkfeed and the app drawer. Being able to arrange the app drawer and put folders inside is great. When you have a lot of apps, having to scroll through pages of apps is just annoying, especially if there is a lot of bloatware.

    Thankfully HTC's minimal design means that there is a refreshing lack of bloatware and even carrier software seems to be minimal.

    The speakers / boom sound may not be 'as loud' as you were led to believe, but the clarity and the depth of the sound from such a svelte device is a league beyond any smartphone currently available. Ringtones even sound majestic and full rather than all mid or high range frequency on most phones.

    The TV software is well integrated and works very well too. From what I have seen of Samsung's software it actually looks more refined and useful too. I'll be able to confirm this shortly.

    In fact just writing this response has made me question why I'm bothering even trying the S4 (other than camera) because the HTC One is one hell of a device.

    The colour reproduction on the screen is phenomenal and the 4.7" was easily useable for me with one hand.

    Even the stock keyboard on Sense 5 is one of the best stock keyboards available outside of 'swiftkey'. The predictive text is accurate and the swype keyboard is responsive and fast. I installed swiftkey, used it for a day and then went back to Sense 5 keyboard because I felt it was more accurate and more aesthetically in keeping.

    Just as the iPhone 4 / 4S would be considered by many a design classic - I do think in 24 months time the HTC One will be looked at in the same light.

    I also think the generally glowing appraisal from critics and the panning of the plastic in the recent S4 reviews will add further weight to the idea that the likes of Samsung will go ahead and start looking at matching build materials with build quality. I suspect the Note 3 will indeed be metal.

    So yeah, I think the majority of those using the HTC One will be VERY Happy indeed with it.

    Even HTC seems to be doing as much as it can to keep dev happy, with easy to unlock boot loader and quick rollout of updates. The difference in 12 months from the One X's often protracted rollout of updates between unlocked and carrier handsets to the HTC One's quick rollout regardless of territory and carrier is night and day and is clear evidence that they 'are' listening to consumer feedback.

    If that continues we can assume that the HTC one will be HTC's most supported device.

    The issue over its success will come down to marketing budgets and lets face it - samsung will spend millions upon millions more than HTC. But I still think HTC have a big hit on their hands.
     
  23. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    #23
    Two things to start off with. HTC One is a Korean Company so it is Korea to the EU.


    Now on to the duty calculator.

    Assuming you had no trade in and 50 dollars for insurance and shipping.
    Also using the point of Origin of Korea to Germany.


    The duty calculator figures are:

    Importing from: Korea
    Importing to: Germany View country guide
    2
    The type of product, its value and where it was manufactured
    Edit
    Product description: HTC One
    Product category: Mobile Phone (Upgrade account to get HS code)
    Product value: US$574.99
    Country of manufacture: Korea
    3
    The cost of shipping and insurance of importing
    Edit
    Shipping costs: US$25.00
    Insurance costs: US$25.00
    Calculation results
    Edit
    Total customs value: €480.80
    - Duty: €0.00
    - VAT: €91.35
    Total import duty & taxes due: €91.35
    Total landed cost: €572.15

    Ok so here i have it for about 572 Euros

    Now German carrier O2 is offering the 32 gigabyte HTC One at 661 Euros which equals about United States 881 dollars.

    so we have about 89 Euro difference between the two.

    Now that difference could be part of how input / output VAT works, exchange rates charges between the Korean Won and the Euro, or additional costs like storage or warehouse fees. Remember VAT is charge twice and the government gets the difference if my understanding is correct.


    Hope this helps a little bit.
     
  24. macrumors 68020

    bmac4

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2013
    Location:
    Atlanta Ga
    #24
    Thanks for your response. It looks like a great device, and I would not mind trying it out. I can not justify buying it though because I have the nexus 4 and note 2. I love stock android so have no desire to lose the nexus 4. That is the one thing I was worry about with the One. All the HTC sense stuff. I am glad to hear that it seems to work more so than just be something to drag the phone down. I am not sure about your statement about is being the first android phone without lag. What was the last android phone you owned? Both the nexus 4 and note 2 neither have lag for me. Again thanks for the response and keep us posted on which device you like better.
     
  25. thread starter macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2011
    #25
    Sorry I didn't reply. I missed your post. I do plan to keep the One. I'm awaiting the camera software update since it seems unanimous that the results are much better. I'm hopeful that'll help me reconcile the hit or miss camera.

    Read my OP for more in-depth details why I think One is ultimately a keeper despite HTC making some really stupid decisions.

    ----------

    UPDATE: After some careful consideration, I've decided I am going to return the Dev Edition One and get the One through Tmobile.

    I'm really annoyed that HTC made an unlocked GSM phone that is only LTE-capable with one network. That is stupid. What's the point of getting it if you're not on or planning to go to AT&T then?

    As a T-Mobile user, you're stuck on HSPA 21 MB/s (not even the good HSPA+ which is 42 MB/s). And you'd think up to 21 MB/s is good enough, right? Except Tmobile's coverage sucks [in NYC]. I am constantly seeing "E" for Edge and "3G" on my device. That's unacceptable this day and age on a 2013 super smartphone.

    Again, a huge knock against HTC.

    So, reluctantly, I give up the extra 32GBs, the $100 Blackberry Curve trade-in, and the fact that I'll get updates directly from HTC (this one hurts the most).

    And for trading all that, I'll get LTE with HSPA+ 42 MB/s to fall back on (and I guess WiFi calling). When you tally the math for the full priced Tmobile HTC One, it comes out to about $630 bucks after tax. That's significantly more than the $550 I paid for the Dev. Edition One (after $100 rebate from the trade-in).

    That REALLY sucks, but ultimately, more reliable coverage and faster data service is more important to me. It's something I would use everyday.

    Thoughts on whether I'm making the right decision or not?
     

Share This Page