My TiBook Just Died!!! Please Help!

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by macktheknife, Nov 10, 2002.

  1. macktheknife macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #1
    OK, maybe I shouldn't have played with those Unix scripts, but my PowerBook has just died. I had edited the Path line in the rc.common file in /etc/. When I restarted my PowerBook, it would take me to a blue screen and just sit there with no processing going on. I'm not sure whether the script editing caused the problem or not, but I have my suspicions.

    So does anyone out there have any advice for me on how to fix my computer? Please help. Thanks.
     
  2. alex_ant macrumors 68020

    alex_ant

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2002
    Location:
    All up in your bidness
    #2
    Editing the script probably caused that problem. Reinstalling OS X would be an option but might be overkill if anyone knows a better way of fixing it. I'm not sure whether or not /etc shows up in OS 9? If you could boot into OS 9 and edit the file from there, you might be set.
     
  3. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #3
    OK, I rebooted via OS 9. I found rc.common via Sherlock. However, when I tried to edit it, it said that I could not do so since it was in an "Invisible Folder." Does anyone know how I can edit it via OS 9? Thanks.
     
  4. daniel77 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Location:
    seattle, wa
  5. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #5
    OK, folks, here's the situation:

    I can boot up in OS 9 with the OS 9 CD and I can probably switch the startup disk to OS 9. Thus, I know that this isn't a hardware problem. I need to edit the rc.common file and remove that pesky line. Fortunately, I made a copy of the file prior to editing it, so I can either edit the edited rc.common or just replace it with the copy. The question is, how do I do it from OS 9? I can't access the /etc directory via OS 9 as it is an "Invisible Folder."

    Is there a way to reinstall the rc.common script without losing my stuff? I'm so close to the solution, I just need a little more help. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks!
     
  6. cb911 macrumors 601

    cb911

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2002
    Location:
    BrisVegas, Australia
    #6
    i can't help you with your current problem, but i would just like to say that if your into that sort of stuff, you should have your hard drive partitioned and set up with another system folder waiting in case things like this happen. if you had the right set-up you could have been working again in about 15 minutes (probably less). :)
     
  7. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #7
    Yeah, I wished I had done many things differently. If I have to reinstall Jaguar, I'll do it, but what should I look out for if I reinstall?
     
  8. BenderBot1138 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2002
    #8
    hmmmmm

    Might be, but have you tried Apple Support Pages yet?

    For example they offer the following in support Article ID 106464. Some of the Big Cats at MacRumors will know more about this, but I thought maybe step 5 looked interesting:
    ---------------
    I. Steps for a blue screen during startup, which may appear with a spinning disc cursor

    1. Mac OS X reviews fonts in the Mac OS 9 System Folder during startup. A damaged Mac OS 9 font file may contribute to this issue. Start up from your Mac OS 9 System Folder or a Mac OS 9 CD-ROM disc. Drag the Fonts folder in the Mac OS 9 System Folder (not the Mac OS X System folder) out of the System Folder into the root level of the hard disk, or to the desktop. Restart the computer from your Mac OS X volume.

    2. Remove third-party startup items.
    a. Start up from your Mac OS 9 volume or a Mac OS 9 CD-ROM disc.
    b. Navigate to your Mac OS X volume.
    c. Temporarily remove third-party items from the /Library/StartupItems and /System/Library/StartupItems folders. You may wish to temporarily store items in your Mac OS X Users folder. If you are unsure whether an item is a third-party item or an Apple-installed item, do not remove it.
    d. Restart from your Mac OS X volume.

    3. Otherwise, follow the steps for Symptom 1.

    4. In some instances, setting auto-dial may interfere with the login process. This option is set in the Networking control Panel under PPP Options by checking the "Connect automatically when starting TCP/IP applications" box. This setting can be removed from single user mode by removing the preferences file that holds the setting. Note: This is an advanced step. This will reset all network settings to default. You will need to reconfigure the Network pane of System Preferences to reconnect to the internet or your network.

    a. Start up in Single-User Mode (press and hold the Command-S key combination during startup until white text appears).
    b. Type: mount -uw /
    c. Press Return.
    d. Type: mv /var/db/SystemConfiguration/preferences.xml preferences.old
    e. Press Return.
    f. Type: reboot
    g. Press Return.

    5. Reset certain privileges. Note: This is an advanced step:

    a. Start up in Single-User Mode (press and hold the Command-S key combination during startup until white text appears).
    b. When the command line appears, type: fsck -y
    c. Press Return.
    d. Type: mount -uw / _
    e. Press Return.
    f. Type: chmod 1775 / _
    g. Press Return.
    h. Type: reboot
    i. Press Return.
     
  9. irmongoose macrumors 68030

    irmongoose

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2001
    Location:
    Sometimes Tokyo, sometimes California
    #9
    Okay, so all you need to do is be able to edit an invisible file in OS 9, right? Well, I looked over at Versiontracker, and there are tons of apps to let you do this... here is the link to the list of apps. Good luck dude.




    irmongoose
     
  10. BenderBot1138 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2002
    #10
    Sorry for the loooong posts here ... here's another suggestion from Apple that can be used in a variety of situations; My understanding of the rc.common file is that it defines a few routines needed to (a) process command-line arguments; and (b) gather system settings.

    From the Apple Support Site:
    How to disable login items per incident, or temporarily

    Each time you log in, Mac OS X 10.1.3 or later allows you to choose whether or not your defined login items will open. If you log in normally, login items open. You may choose not to have them open by pressing the Shift key. Follow these steps to disable login items:

    1. Start up the computer.
    2. As soon as you see the blue background appear with a progress bar and "Mac OS X," press and hold the Shift key. See Note 1.
    3. If the Login Window appears, release the Shift key to log in, then immediately press and hold the Shift key again. See Note 2.
    4. Release the Shift key after the desktop appears.
    Notes:

    1. Timing is important. Do not hold the Shift key before the blue screen, the progress bar, and "Mac OS X" appear.

    2. This feature works whether or not you have Mac OS X set up to automatically log in a particular user. With automatic login, you effectively skip Step 3. For more on the automatic login feature, see technical document 106164, "Mac OS X: How to Log In Automatically at Startup".

    3. Login items are those that you may set up to open automatically, immediately after logging in to the computer. For information on setup, see technical document 106146, "Mac OS X: How to Set up Login Items".
     
  11. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #11
    Thanks, for the advice, guys. I'm going to try to try to replace the rc.common file in OS 9 first with some sharewares that irmongoose suggested. I was so desparate last night that I was considering reinstalling OS X completely. I'll keep you guys updated on the situation.
     
  12. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #12
    Iromongoose, you 'dah man!!!!!!

    Yup, it *was* that stupid rc.common file! Switched the edited file with a backup I saved (good thing I saved a backup copy). Mac OS X boots up without a problem. I've learned my lesson: I'll never, ever play with fire!

    Thanks to everyone, especially to Iromongoose!
     
  13. irmongoose macrumors 68030

    irmongoose

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2001
    Location:
    Sometimes Tokyo, sometimes California
    #13
    Re: Iromongoose, you 'dah man!!!!!!

    heh. I'm just happy it worked. Good job, man. And yah... don't play with those files anymore!!

    :D



    irmongoose
     
  14. BenderBot1138 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2002
    #14
    TiBook Lives!!!

    Great save irmongoose :D

    Glad to hear you're back up and running again macktheknife. Curious, what were you trying to do when you blew out your privileges ? Share the wealth... :confused:

    :cool:
     
  15. macktheknife thread starter macrumors 6502a

    macktheknife

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    #15
    OK, this was what had happened. I was trying to edit some startup scripts so that I could type "ant" in Terminal instead of "/usr/bin/ant/jakarta-1.2.0/bin" to start up ant. I had edited the csh.login script, but it did not work. Then I decided to edit the "rc.common" script in the /etc directory, which is what OS X loads when it starts up. I edited the path, and got what I wanted to work, but created another problem of Terminal not recgonizing commands such as "sudo" or "ls."

    So . . . I decided to add another path in the rc.common script, rebooted, and panicked when I saw the "Aqua screen of death" staring back at me. I later realized that what had happened was that by changing the path, OS X could not load the files from the /bin directory, which were critical for the OS to boot.

    Thanks to Iromongoose, I was able to put an original copy of rc.common back into the invisible /etc directory in OS 9. (Aside: I never realized how fast my TiBook was in OS 9! Man, my 550 Mhz TiBook running in OS 9 *is* at least as fast as my old PIII 1Ghz Dell.) I rebooted, the OS X window popped up, and I was home free.

    This whole ordeal might sound a bit strange, but it was actually not all that complicated. The lessons that I have learned from this experience are mainly: know what those Unix scripts do, know what you are doing when you're editing those scripts, and always make a copy of the original just in case.

    I still want to be a Unix power user, but I guess I should hold off on editing those scripts until I get a copy of "Mac OS X Unleashed" in my hands.
     
  16. Chisholm macrumors regular

    Chisholm

    Joined:
    May 31, 2002
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
    #16
    I was about to suggest you boot from an OS8.6 CD. Oh well! I would like to also become a unix power user myself, but I have this strange ability to make the uncrashable crash. Hmm, but then again, I've also "fixed" crashed computers by simply being in the same room with said computer. Maybe devine intrevention. Or satan's sense of humor. Or stupid users. :eek: OMG did I say stupid????LOL!

    glad you got it going!

    cheers!
    -John
     
  17. sparkleytone macrumors 68020

    sparkleytone

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2001
    Location:
    Greensboro, NC
    #17
    i told you to edit the csh.login file :eek:

    also, do not edit rc files unless you really know what you are doing...rc files are run at boot and can really screw your system over...

    all you really had to do was boot into single user mode and type 'mount -a'

    then pico the offending file, fix, and reboot.
     

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