My website doesn't work ONLY on my Mac

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by TWLreal, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. TWLreal macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    #1
    This is pretty freaking mind boggling.

    I registered for personal hosting with 1and1.com. I get 2 domain names. That's great stuff.

    Things are activated and I start uploading my files to the FTP.

    First thing I notice, only one of my domains can be accessed by FTP. I figure the second one isn't propagated yet so I let it go.

    Fast forward to now, I still can't access my second domain. Not by browser or by FTP. Pretty ****ing ridiculous.

    Since the two domains share the same FTP, I upload files to it, deactivate the second domain so ONLY the non working one remains.

    I still can't get to it.

    I fire up my PC and behold, it works. I can connect to the FTP and browse it online.

    I don't get. Is there something like a HOSTS file in OS X where I might have blocked the website somehow? It doesn't work under Safari or Firefox and Fetch can't connect.
     
  2. tuartboy macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #2
    Can you ftp from terminal?

    Yes, there is a hosts file, but if you don't know about it, then you can't have changed it. You need to be root to modify it.
     
  3. ddekker macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Michigan
    #3
    Dns

    I can't explain it, but I have noticed that on the same exact network, using DHCP and things the apples and the PC use different DNS servers and propagate at different rates, one way I have sped up Safari is by entering in the DNS numbers my pc uses into safai preferences. The TTL on domains should be close to the same, if it goes on more than a day I'm betting someone has something messed up on your DNS at the registrar..

    DD
     
  4. TWLreal thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    #4
    I see what you mean.

    I just found it odd that on the same connection, I can access it on my Windows machine but not on my Mac.

    Goddamnit, it will be ridiculous if I can't access my own website when I only have Dreamweaver on the Mac.
     
  5. TWLreal thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    #5
    I am running as root. Yeah, I know, I know.

    Where is the file and what's the FTP command under Terminal?
     
  6. TWLreal thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    #6
    Scratch that guys.

    All is well after flushing the DNS in Terminal. Safari sees the website and so does Fetch.

    The command is lookupd -flushcache for future reference for others.
     
  7. tuartboy macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #7
    You're running as admin or root? You have to jump through some hoops in Netinfo Manager just to get root even enabled on OS X. It comes default with no root account.

    Hosts is usually in etc/

    For ftp info, just do a "man ftp"

    Edit: Glad you finally got your DNS propagated. In the future you can try connecting to your server's IP address instead (if you know it) when that happens.
     
  8. ddekker macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    Michigan
    #8
    Dns

    Hooking to the server IP only works if you are hosting just one site, or you run your own interenal DNS server, I have many sites on a single IP

    DD
     
  9. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #9
    Not really; you just can't log in as root by default. The root account is still there and accessible though.

    Simple way to prove this - drop into terminal, and (assuming you're an admin) type "sudo su". After typing your password you'll be running as root (check this with "echo $USER" from the command line).
     
  10. tuartboy macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #10
    Well, sudo is different from su. A user in the sudoers file (usually located in etc/) is given permission to act as root for one operation. When you sudo, you aren't really root; you are just a really powerful user that now has root permissions.

    AFAIK, to actually become root in OS X you have to open NetInfo Manager and go to the "Security" menu and select "Enable root user". This will then turn on the true Super User in OS X.

    As far as the hosts file, you might be able to sudo edit that, so maybe my description was wrong.

    And as far as the IP, you are right. I wasn't paying attention to the OP.
     
  11. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #11
    No, go back and read what I wrote. You use sudo to become root - "sudo su" ("su" is "switch user" - and implies root unless you pick a different username). You're then root for as long as you want to be, until you type "exit".

    Don't take my word for it (or assume I'm wrong) - try it for yourself. If you need more proof, type "whoami" after you've done the "sudo su" command. You will be root, running in a bash shell. Once you type "exit", you will be back to your original shell as yourself.

    Edit: changed the phrasing somewhat.
     
  12. tuartboy macrumors 6502a

    tuartboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2005
    #12
    Not only is it OT, but I'm tired.

    I'll just not worry about it, concede complete victory to you, and be on my merry way. :)
     

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