National Identity Card... By Microsoft and HP.

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by thatwendigo, May 28, 2005.

  1. thatwendigo macrumors 6502a

    thatwendigo

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2003
    Location:
    Sum, Ergo Sum.
    #1
    I'm not joking.

    HP Announces New National Identity System Solution Built on Microsoft .NET Platform
    Friday May 27, 6:00 am ET
    Solution Will Drive Simplified, Secure Identification Management for Governments Around the World

    PALO ALTO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 27, 2005--HP (NYSE:HPQ - News; Nasdaq:HPQ - News) today announced the availability of the HP National Identity System (NIS) solution on the Microsoft® .NET platform.

    The HP NIS solution allows governments to build and quickly deploy at an affordable price a complete, standards-based and technologically agile infrastructure that meets their changing needs for security and identity management.

    Going beyond simple secure identification and authentication functionality, the solution enables modern national identification systems to allow citizens to access e-government services and conduct secure transactions. The solution also provides citizens with improved secure and intelligent identity documents.

    For example, with heightened security awareness at national borders, the solution fulfills the new requirement to ensure traveler and citizen credentials across an entire country or region.

    In addition, the modular nature of the solution enables national and regional governments to more easily plug in additional elements, such as biometrics, to customize and balance the level of security and privacy as defined by a government's policy and requirements.

    Recent figures from industry analyst firm Morgan Keegan show that the worldwide identity management market is approximately $4.8 billion and is estimated to grow to approximately $10.7 billion in 2007.(1)

    "The need to securely identify people moving across national and international borders has never been more important than it is today," said Jim Ganthier, worldwide leader, Defense, Intelligence and Public Safety, HP. "HP and Microsoft are working together to provide government agencies the ability to access the integrated data streams needed to securely identify people both in the physical and virtual worlds."

    Built using HP's expertise in national identity systems, security frameworks and public key infrastructures (PKI), the HP NIS can be fully integrated into the HP e-government framework and integrated into a nation's e-government services delivery framework. The solution encompasses all the essential national identification system attributes and functions, including:

    * Online and offline enrollment of demographic and biometric data through live capture
    * Local request as well as regional/central verification and registration
    * Multi-tier architecture
    * Secure management of the document lifecycle
    * Biometric and personalization subsystem integration
    * Online and offline identity verification
    * Fault tolerance and disaster recovery through design

    HP and Microsoft are investing in the solution through initiatives such as joint training programs and the establishment of specialist centers around the world to further develop, demonstrate and sell national identity system solutions.

    The NIS leverages HP's extensive experience in delivering fully integrated solutions, which include consulting and integration, desktops, servers, management software and support services. Recognizing HP's .NET commitment and unique capabilities, Microsoft has endorsed HP as its worldwide prime integrator for Microsoft .NET technologies.

    For the HP NIS solution, Microsoft supplies a wide range of software products and technologies, including Microsoft Server 2003 Enterprise Edition, Microsoft BizTalk Server 2004, Microsoft SQL Server 2000 (64-bit), the Microsoft .NET Framework and Microsoft Services.

    "Microsoft recognizes that national governments and their principal agencies have unique information technology requirements, particularly as more governments look to implement e-government solutions," said Jan Muehlfeit, vice president, Public Sector -EMEA, Microsoft. "Secure and reliable identification and authentication of individuals helps power more useful and compelling experiences for users and provides citizens easy and secure access to services. Working with industry partners such as HP is an important step and will provide public sector organizations with new technology solutions to address these key customer concerns."

    HP has successfully delivered innovative NIS solutions to a wide array of national and regional governments. As part of working with this wide range of customers, HP identity management solutions have spanned HP-UX, open source and Microsoft platforms, as well as HP OpenView Identity Management software and services.

    The Italian Ministry of Interior, for example, is working with HP to provide smart electronic national identity documents for all Italian citizens. The initiative will assist particularly in the delivery of e-government services by supplying secure access to government services portals and enabling transaction authentication through digital signatures.

    In addition, HP is connecting citizens in Israel, Poland, Slovakia and Bulgaria with new identity and entitlement documents such as passports, driving licenses and identity cards to ensure security and public safety through improved and counterfeit resistant technology.

    For nearly two decades, HP and Microsoft have been working together to define industry standards through joint development, testing and preparation of leading PC and server solutions. During this time, Microsoft and HP have participated in a variety of programs including Microsoft's Joint Development Program, Rapid Development Program and Corporate Preview Program. Microsoft also has designated HP as a Global Launch Partner.
     
  2. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    #2
    Microsoft. Running personal security databases nationwide. Microsoft...security...

    End of the world, here we come.
     
  3. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #3
    "Sorry but you don't seem to exist according to our computers..."
     
  4. pb12 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2003
    #4
    Does anyone else feel like 1984 is arriving in very real ways?
     
  5. rosalindavenue macrumors 6502a

    rosalindavenue

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Virginia, USA
    #5
    Great-- wait till the script kiddies and the Russian mob hijack our "microsoft ids"-- goodbye credit history, goodbye bank account, hello IRS and ID checks-- "Your papers, please?"
     
  6. Apple Hobo macrumors 6502a

    Apple Hobo

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2004
    Location:
    A series of tubes
    #7
    With news stories like this, I recently pulled 1984 (along with Animal Farm) off my bookshelf to reread.

    National ID + Microsoft sounds like a massive train wreck in the making. :eek: :(
     
  7. sjpetry macrumors 65816

    sjpetry

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Tamarindo, Costa Rica
    #8
    If they ever force us to have I.D. cards.....I am not going to live in this country. :cool:
     
  8. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #9
    I've sworn never to live in your country around 10 years ago when I was 13. I don't know why, but I never did like the place, no offense to (most) of the people, especially the Americans who post here.

    Anyway, just because HP and MS are developing this, doesn't mean that the US gov't will use it. It doesn't mean ANY nation will use it. They still need to sell it. Hopefully, some high-ranking people in governments across the world are Mac users. :eek:
     
  9. sjpetry macrumors 65816

    sjpetry

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Tamarindo, Costa Rica
    #10
    Well not yet anyways. ;)


    And I'll agree with you that America isn't the best place to live. But you have to admit it isn't the worst. :)
     
  10. *Y* macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2004
    Location:
    VA
    #11
    In your opinion what is the best place to live?
     
  11. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #12
    Its a toss-up between a great city in the US, or a bad city in Canada. But I do have more rights in Canada, so........

    It may actually be a toss-up between the US and a few "semi-3rd World, trying to become developed but not quite there yet" countries. They don't really have the problems that the US has, and if you save a bit of cash, you'll live like a king in some of those countries. :)
     
  12. Daveway macrumors 68040

    Daveway

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Location:
    New Orleans / Lafayette, La
    #13
    I thought Microsoft was going to abandon .net because it was a flop. :confused: :confused:
     
  13. sjpetry macrumors 65816

    sjpetry

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Tamarindo, Costa Rica
    #14
    Costa Rica. ;) :cool:
     
  14. After G macrumors 68000

    After G

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #15
    A National ID system from the people who currently make some of the crappiest operating system software (MS) and x86 hardware (HP)?

    Didn't that universal sign-in thing from Microsoft get hacked? I don't have much hope that the software will improve for national IDs, since Microsoft is trying to be all things to all people, and spreading itself too thin.

    As for the hardware side of things, it's a tossup. I've had good (printers, calculators) and bad (computers) hardware from HP.
     
  15. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #16
    Since it was probably directed to my comment (although you're all happy to answer :) ), probably Canada (I am Canadian, after all), New Zealand, several of the Scandinavian countries, and possibly Australia (where i live now). Also add in a few Caribbean countries (I've been to around 10 of them, so I have an idea of what's good). Hong Kong has amazing food though, and electronics for cheap, so that one is a short term consideration.

    Anyway, the US was a non-consideration for me since I was young, and I never followed any politics back then, so I really don't know where it all comes from. However, things like this assure me that my very early decision was a good idea. After all, the US isn't really the land of the free. They promote it like it was a product of theirs, but they don't practice it well. I do like many Americans though, and I may have to be in NYC for a few months next year. Only great thing about that is that I get to go to the Apple Store. I've never been to an official Apple Store before. :)
     
  16. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #17
    So you don't have a drivers license or social security card?

    Not that I support this... at all. Microsoft or not, this is a bad idea. With the way the government is heading, they probably just saw an opportunity and figured they go for it. Only M$ would think this was a good idea, and HP should be ashamed of themselves.
     
  17. Inspector Lee macrumors 6502a

    Inspector Lee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2004
    Location:
    East Lansing, MI
    #18
    But all the "great" cities in the US don't show up in Fodor's guides or lists put out by entities on a whim. I think "great" cities no matter what country one is talking/writing/thinking about are the untrammeled unknowns, where people truly live without interference or persuasion, headlines or guidelines, just sun up and sundown and do your thing. And once the latest, greatest place to live is "discovered" everything goes kaput - not overnight but a slow slow death, sometimes spanning generations. Strip malls and custer stands, expansion and sprawl. So under this cockneyed 2:05 AM with Sierra in hand philosophy, am I writing that it is best to try to stay one step ahead of the societal game and adopt a nomadic existence? Maybe. Is it possible for the common man to raise a family and do this? Highly unlikely. All I know is I agree with the McQueen quote in my sig...

    Back on topic, the words Microsoft and security should never be used in the same sentence. Much like syphilis and brothel. One hears something like this and it is best to not walk away but run (if possible)...
     
  18. sjpetry macrumors 65816

    sjpetry

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Tamarindo, Costa Rica
    #19
    My question should have been rephrased. Also you don't have to or are forced to have drivers license. ;)

    I just don't want it to turn into a Scif Movie.


    And I don't have a Drivers License.
     
  19. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    LaLaLand, CA
    #20
    Well, if you want to drive you do. :p You get what I mean though. We are moving toward a society where you will need identification for anything. We're already close. I'm not saying I like it. I agree, it's just too easily abused.

    Those who would give up liberty for temporary, perceived safety (or convenience) deserve neither.
     
  20. sjpetry macrumors 65816

    sjpetry

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    Tamarindo, Costa Rica
    #21
    Agreed.

    We can all agree that we could do without Big Brother looking over our shoulder.
     
  21. Fukui macrumors 68000

    Fukui

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    #22
    Yup, the password reset feature didn't um, require a password.


    Yes, just when the real leashes are being taken off, they prepare the e-leash.
     
  22. BornAgainMac macrumors 603

    BornAgainMac

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2004
    Location:
    Florida Resident
    #23
    I get this error with my Identity card.

    "You are identified as a Mac user. Access denied."

    :eek:
     
  23. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #24
    LMAO :D
     
  24. neildmitchell macrumors 6502a

    neildmitchell

    Joined:
    May 21, 2005
    #25
    1984

    For those who have not read 1984 by George Orwell, I suggest you read it.

    The year is 1984; the scene is London, largest population center of Airstrip One.

    Airstrip One is part of the vast political entity Oceania, which is eternally at war with one of two other vast entities, Eurasia and Eastasia. At any moment, depending upon current alignments, all existing records show either that Oceania has always been at war with Eurasia and allied with Eastasia, or that it has always been at war with Eastasia and allied with Eurasia. Winston Smith knows this, because his work at the Ministry of Truth involves the constant "correction" of such records. "'Who controls the past,' ran the Party slogan, 'controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.'

    In a grim city and a terrifying country, where Big Brother is always Watching You and the Thought Police can practically read your mind, Winston is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions. He knows the Party's official image of the world is a fluid fiction. He knows the Party controls the people by feeding them lies and narrowing their imaginations through a process of bewilderment and brutalization that alienates each individual from his fellows and deprives him of every liberating human pursuit from reasoned inquiry to sexual passion."

    Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party. Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.
     

Share This Page