Need some network help

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by chales, Jan 30, 2004.

  1. chales macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #1
    Let me first explain what I want to do here.

    I have a cable internet connection coming into a router creating a general wired network throughout the house. My friend had a gateway that he wasn't using so he gave it to me. I plugged my room's interent connection into the gateway and then plugged my computer into it. It can get on the internet just fine but there is just one problem: I can't see anybody on the home network now.

    By using a gateway, can I no longer see the network above it or can I somehow open it up in the settings of the gateway?

    Thanks for the help guys and I'll check the thread often for quick updates.
     
  2. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #2
    As I recall, a gateway is supposed to be what separates your network from the internet (I could be wrong though). Putting a gateway between you and your router is probably not a good thing. Why did you put the gateway in? Since your network is behind the router, it is fairly safe from the outside, and the router can supply as many IP addresses as you want, I just don't see why you need a gateway.
     
  3. chales thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #3
    My friend gave me the gateway for free so I tried to use it. Also, the router is in another room accross the house and I wanted to open up some more network slots in my room for my girlfriend and friends to get on the network.

    I'm beginning to think that I need a hub to do what I want to do...or another router??
     
  4. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

    Joined:
    May 15, 2003
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #4
    You need to buy a switch. You can also buy a hub, but a switch costs the same, and is considerably faster. Don't buy another router, it will further break apart your network, just like the gateway did. So, go with a switch. Your router will provide all the additional IP addresses, you won't have to do anything but plug it in.
     
  5. chales thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #5
    Thanks for the help, still getting into all this networking stuff. Didn't quite know the difference between the switch, hub, and gateway.
     
  6. tomf87 macrumors 65816

    tomf87

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2003
    #6
    A gateway is another term for a router. It connects networks of possibly different protocols together.

    A hub can connect multiple machines together, however traffic that is destined for one machine gets sent to all machines, i.e. they are in the same collision domain.

    A switch connects multiple machines together, but traffic destined for one machine goes to that machine and not the others, i.e. they are in separate collision domains.

    Also, a hub will connect all devices at half duplex, or only one machine can "talk" at any given time. A switch allows all machines to "talk" at the same time, and this is called full duplex. Full duplex usage allows you to get better efficiency from your network, and eliminates collisions. Collisions will cause data to be retransmitted, and when collisions are happening, other devices cannot communicate.

    You could probably use the gateway your friend gave you if it has a built-in switch. Just don't use the WAN port. Connect everything into the built-in switch and you're set!
     
  7. chales thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    #7
    Thanks for the definitions! They clear things up big time. I'll try what you said about not hooking into the WAN port in the morning and see how that works.
     

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