Net speed record smashed

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by iWantAMac, Mar 6, 2003.

  1. iWantAMac macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2003
    Location:
    AUS
    #1
    Net speed record smashed

    By Dr David Whitehouse
    BBC News Online science editor

    Scientists have set a new internet speed record by transferring 6.7 gigabytes of data across 10,978 kilometres (6,800 miles), from Sunnyvale in the US to Amsterdam in Holland, in less than one minute

    Using a quantity of data equivalent to two feature-length DVD-quality movies, the transfer was accomplished at an average speed of more than 923 megabits per second, or more than 3,500 times faster than a typical home broadband connection.

    Les Cottrel, of Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (Slac) Computer Services, said: "By exploring the edges of internet technologies' performance envelope, we will bring high-speed data transfer to practical everyday applications."

    He added that potential uses included: "Doctors at multiple sites sharing and discussing a patient's cardio-angiographs to diagnose and plan treatment; or disaster recovery experts sharing information across the globe in near real-time to develop recovery and relief plans."

    Next generation

    The data were sent across the Internet2 network. This is operated by a consortium of 200 universities working in a worldwide effort to develop and deploy tomorrow's internet.

    It is intended to connect and serve research and educational institutions at transmission speeds that allow near-instant transfer of hundreds of megabytes of data.

    The motivation for the record was the need to transfer and analyse the vast amounts of data produced by particle physicists studying the fundamental building blocks of matter.

    Raymond Orbach, director of the US Energy Department's Office of Science, said: "It underlines the tradition in particle physics of groundbreaking work in manipulation and transfer of enormous datasets."

    Harvey Newman, professor of physics at Caltech, said: "The largest high-energy experiments are already dealing with data stores approaching the petabyte range and we expect this to increase by a factor of 1,000 over the next decade."

    During its research, Slac has accumulated the largest known database in the world, which grows at one terabyte per day.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/2822333.stm
     
  2. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Location:
    1 Block away from NYC.
  3. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #3
    Nice speed - good for streaming DVDs - but what else good would it really be? It will be nice when version 2 of the internet is operational to the public.

    Personally, I wouldn't want to have it till its available everywhere - if I had such a system at work and then went home to my TI and it felt like a slug?

    D ;)
     
  4. leprechaunG4 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    #4
    COOL!

    Duke - I've already experienced that sensation. Worked for an ISP. When I was at work, I had an average connection speed of over 4 Mbps. Then I would go back to a dorm and a congested college campus network.
     
  5. janey macrumors 603

    janey

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2002
    Location:
    sunny los angeles
    #6
    slow t1 @ school (everyone plays CS) -> slow 56k dialup -> fast fast T1, DSL and cable @ home -> dialup/slow DSL @ friend's house -> back to fast internet @ home
    it drives me nuts.
     
  6. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #7
    Re: Net speed record smashed

    Now that would be a lot of porn, but wow anyways for scientific data.
     
  7. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #8
    Okay now that the wows of how fast the internet transfer was think about the hardware they were using to do it. That is a lot of data. They had some extremely fast hard drives and computers.
     
  8. aethier macrumors 6502a

    aethier

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2003
    Location:
    Montréal, Canada
    #9
    that is a good point.
    anyone know if there are hd faster then 15000rpm? probably but ive never heard of any

    aethier
     
  9. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #10
    I'm thinking massive amoonts of RAM and a very very large SCSI Raid array.
     
  10. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Location:
    1 Block away from NYC.
    #11
    Yeah that system must be insane... :eek:

    Can you imagine the stuff you can download in literal milliseconds?
     
  11. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #12
    lol. So true.... so true.... :D
     
  12. groovebuster macrumors 65816

    groovebuster

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2002
    Location:
    3rd rock from the sun...
    #13
    ??i]Originally posted by MacBandit [/i]
    Okay now that the wows of how fast the internet transfer was think about the hardware they were using to do it. That is a lot of data. They had some extremely fast hard drives and computers. [/QUOTE]

    Calm down guys... it is 938MBits per second, not Megabytes per second. So it equals 117MBytes per second. No that much of a problem for a big server with a decent RAID-System and multiple processors and network connections.

    The more interesting part is that it was over such a long distance and the bandwidth this new technology is gonna offer for the cables connecting the continents. Gigabit Ethernet we already have in our PowerMacs, so no big deal. Even though no Mac can get full advantage of the bandwidth alone, it starts to be interesting when you can shovel a lot of data through your network without a "traffic-jam" with several Computers involved at the same time and you still have the feeling the server harddrive is just as fast as your local harddrive. :) Gigabit Ethernet is a blessing for music and video studios when they are running several workstations and servers with heavy load on the LAN.

    But of course it would be nice to have the same speed available for a VPN connection for branches in different cities. But until that is available for the masses, especially for a price that the average internet user or little company can afford, we'll see a lot of time gonna pass. :)

    groovebuster
     
  13. MacBandit macrumors 604

    MacBandit

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2002
    Location:
    Springfield, OR (Home of the Simpsons)
    #14


    Calm down guys... it is 938MBits per second, not Megabytes per second. So it equals 117MBytes per second. No that much of a problem for a big server with a decent RAID-System and multiple processors and network connections.

    The more interesting part is that it was over such a long distance and the bandwidth this new technology is gonna offer for the cables connecting the continents. Gigabit Ethernet we already have in our PowerMacs, so no big deal. Even though no Mac can get full advantage of the bandwidth alone, it starts to be interesting when you can shovel a lot of data through your network without a "traffic-jam" with several Computers involved at the same time and you still have the feeling the server harddrive is just as fast as your local harddrive. :) Gigabit Ethernet is a blessing for music and video studios when they are running several workstations and servers with heavy load on the LAN.

    But of course it would be nice to have the same speed available for a VPN connection for branches in different cities. But until that is available for the masses, especially for a price that the average internet user or little company can afford, we'll see a lot of time gonna pass. :)

    groovebuster
    [/QUOTE]

    Sorry, your right. I just didn't take the time to realize how many megs a second it really was.

    Now that I have had time to think about it I'm not that impressed. The internet II is unavailable to most of the world therfore it has little to no traffic and therefore it has nearly complete open bandwith. How fast do you think you could transfer data over the normal internet if 99.99999% of all people quit using it.
     

Share This Page