Network Settings

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by scem0, Jan 10, 2004.

  1. scem0 macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!
    #1
    I am receiving cable from an ISP, and then three computers are connected from one router.

    Is there a way where I can split up the service? I dont know how to word what I'm asking though.

    Is 33% of the 'signal' coming from the ISP going to each computer?

    If this is the case is there any way I can make it where 20% of the signal goes to my mom's computer since she doesn't use it often.

    Maybe make 20% go to the PC which I don't use anymore. Maybe make the other 60% go to the computer I'm on all the time.

    Is there any way I can do this?

    Am I making any sense? :confused: ;)

    Thanks,

    scem0
     
  2. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #2
    I don't think you can designate bandwidth to specific systems within your network. Who ever needs the bandwidth at the time will get it, if everyone is requesting data at the same time it *should* split the available bandwidth between you.
     
  3. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #3
    This is not how a router works. TCP/IP (TCP is the Transport Control Protocol, which is another "wrapper" around the pieces of Internet Protocol data coming/going from/to the Internet) sends information in packets, which are basically little chunks of actual data padded out with extra stuff like source IP address, destination IP address, etc. Your router is basically taking packets from all your computers as they come in, modifying them so it looks like the router is the actual requestor, and then sending them out (one at a time, but very fast) onto the Internet over your cable, DSL, or dialup connection. The router also examines the packets coming in from your Internet connection and routes them to the appropriate computer on your home network.

    So basically at any instant in time information from just one of your computers is being sent out - you can't split up a TCP/IP packet in other words. Also, TCP/IP (at least with IPv4) doesn't have any way to prioritize traffic - that's one of the touted benefits of IPv6.

    There are some WiFi access points that will cap the maximum amount of bandwidth given to any one computer, but that's not the same thing - plus your actual internet connection speed is probably lower than even a relatively slow WiFi connection.
     
  4. scem0 thread starter macrumors 604

    scem0

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    back in NYC!

Share This Page