New Bush Policy Makes It Tougher To Get Money for College

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by thedude110, May 2, 2006.

  1. thedude110 macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #1
    Link.

    That's a great comfort to my students, who wouldn't be able to fulfill the requirements simply because we don't have enough lab sciences (because we don't have enough lab classrooms to accomodate our overpopulated student body).

    Not only that, but it sure looks to me like the beginning of a federal curriculum for secondary education.

    Time to get out of teaching before I'm required to teach Ann Coulter in my English class ...
     
  2. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #2
    I used to work for a student loan company, and there were people who had college loans so high, they couldn't even afford to pay the interest while working at full time jobs. We're talking lawyers and doctors in low income areas, not to mention teachers. No wonder so many people don't even bother. I actually dropped out of college for the same reason, and only later finished up at a technical school. Was especially tough paying off debts after the 'net bubble burst and 9/11 when I took whatever job I could find, if I could find a job, no matter how little it paid.

    But hey, it's a lot easier to get rid of the middle class, and create a generation of unskilled laborers. Not that there will be many jobs for them either. Here's where I make the joke about welfare and locking up the homeless in jail.
     
  3. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #3
    The original idea of public education was to prepare students with nothing more than the ability to follow and read simple instructions.

    A class of worker bees to serve industry.

    I'm in the process of trying to figure out how my daughter will be able to attend college this fall.

    We're barely making ends meet, but supposedly make too much to qualify
    for a Pell Grant.

    There's something VERY wrong with an education system that forces a straight A, AP student to wonder if she will be able to afford higher education.

    The tuition R&B where she wants to go is $20,197 per year not counting
    books or any extra living expenses.

    In 2 years her sister will be right behind her. Argggggggh!
     
  4. ahunter3 macrumors 6502

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    #4
    That's OK, the need for highly educated workers will still be adequately met in forthcoming years.

    By students from China.
     
  5. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #5
    You mean in China.
     
  6. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

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    #6
    Do the first two years at a community college. Get those Freshman classes that everybody has to take out of the way. Then when she graduates with a 2-year degree she can transfer all those (much cheaper) credit hours to the fancy university.

    Besides the cost savings, you also get to meet some great people at community college. Some of my favorite teachers I met at my local community college. There's also a higher percentage of older students, which leads to less screwing around in class and a more serious atmosphere than some freshman classes at university. Plus generally smaller class sizes, for more individual attention.

    Ok, I sounded kind of like a brochure there, but it worked for me. I went to the Community College of Aurora in Colorado, earned my Associate of Arts degree, then went down to SMU in Dallas and now I've got a pretty piece of paper from them as well. All while saving the equivalent of 3 semesters worth of private school tuition.
     
  7. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #7
    Guaranteeing a healthy crop of future Republicans huh? :p

    In what universe is it a good idea to make education harder for people to get?
     
  8. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #8
    Well, at some point though you have to make a decision about how much education a country can afford to fund. We all agree education is a good thing, but clearly providing 60 years of free public education so that people can get fifteen PhDs isn't a good idea.
     
  9. thedude110 thread starter macrumors 68020

    thedude110

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    #9
    Last I checked the feds aren't funding PhD candidates in any way other than loans.

    And most PhD candidates are on free rides from their schools.
     
  10. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    Fourteen might not be enough to keep your job from being outsourced.
     
  11. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #11
    Excellent! That's going to send me off to bed laughing. Thanks!
     
  12. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #12
    Mmmm, not entirely true. There are NSF and DOD fellowships, NIH training grants (like T32), etc, that pay for graduate education in a variety of fields. And many graduate students are supported through research grant money, that ultimately comes from the government. But they're supported for doing valuable research work. It isn't like a scholarship. It was awarded to the principal investigator (a professor) on the merit of the research plan.
     
  13. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #13
    And the government is also subsidizing education when it lets students ride pblic transportation for less. And so on.
     
  14. Pittsax macrumors 6502

    Pittsax

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    #14
    This is very true, but as a PhD student in this situation, the money isn't nearly as available as it seems.

    Getting an NSF fellowship is VERY hard, and getting any kind of fellowship from the NIH is getting increasingly hard as well. Last I heard, they were only funding the top 8% of applicants. Even people who are trying to start up their own labs are having difficulty because of the budget crisis. A lot of younger investigators are probably going to have to move out of science because Bush and Co. simply haven't made the funds available.
     
  15. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #15
    You hit the nail right on the head BUDGET CRISIS.

    How much money has this administration squandered away to benefit special interests in the Military Industrial, Pharma and Big Oil sectors?

    How many high tech jobs have been farmed out to foreign interests.


    We've become the United Corporations of America, but those corporations
    are not required to put anything back in to cover social needs.

    If is were not for this blatant fleecing of our tax dollars, every single student could afford at least a 4 year degree at publicly funded colleges and universities.
     
  16. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #16
    That's not always the case. I know of several people with whom I graduated who transferred from various junior colleges, and some of them had a lot of trouble getting courses to transfer. If you're planning on changing schools, it's best to find out beforehand what the four year school will and won't.

    Those same students also spoke of having a lot of problems adjusting academically. Perhaps it's different where you live, but around here, all the two year colleges are just high school revisited, i.e. not very challenging. When they got up to the varsity so to speak, most of them weren't as prepared as students that started in a four year school, and a lot of them had their posteriors (and their GPA's) handed to them on a plate.
     
  17. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #17
    Yeah, I'm definitely agreeing with you. My funding mechanism is University related, and AFAIK, doesn't come out of federal pockets. But I think that the system for funding research is becoming increasingly frustrating, too. I think there should be balance -- the government also has a past history for funding junk research and not producing anything out of it. But I also feel like I know a lot of people, including myself, who have research capabilities, but want to do (for instance, in my field) clinical work (or industry or whatever), because the idea of fighting so hard for grants that are much smaller than operating budgets of small engineering projects (from my old days) is just...egh. :( Like rats in a cage fighting for a little piece of cheese, when the cage door isn't even locked shut.
     
  18. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #18
    I'm sure access to funding depends on what field you're working in.

    If you don't mind working under a military contractor, you can probably get all the money you want.
     

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