New MBP and Mac user

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Chrisqo, Mar 31, 2007.

  1. Chrisqo macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
    #1
    I just purchased my first mac. I haven't actually received it yet, I'm actually writing this post from my family's PC. Outside of the out-of-box instructions that are sure to accompany my MBP, I was wondering if any of the regulars can offer some additional tips to get my MBP up and rolling in good order. I realize it's a rather broad and vague question to ask, and I apologize if this is a double post. I checked back a few pages and didn't find a question like it. For the most part, it's going to be used as a multi-media machine, music ripping, editing, dvd's, sub's, things of that nature. Thanks.
     
  2. Scarlet Fever macrumors 68040

    Scarlet Fever

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2005
    Location:
    Bookshop!
    #2
    When you get it, be sure to read over the information about OS X. That should answer a lot of your questions.

    There is a bit of a learning curve, but just be open-minded about it, and you should be fine :)
     
  3. phil83 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2006
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #3
    New Mac's

    A lot of people like to re-install the OS, by doing a clean install. This is because your MBP will autimatically be loaded up with all software options, and languages. Just re-installing and deleting all the languages but English saves over 4 gigs of space. I think Garage band takes like another gig of space but I kept it. But its not really that big of a deal though unless your your going to max your hard drive with movies or something. I played with the computer for a day and then did the clean install.

    -Also for some reason I had system stability problems like random programs would shutdown and so would the computer. A clean install fixed that problem.

    To do a clean install just pop in the system CD and fallow the instructions but make sure you click on the clean install box. I forgot the first time and had to repeat the whole process over two hours later :confused:

    Anyways Congrats, hope you enjoy!
     
  4. TBi macrumors 68030

    TBi

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #4
    I found macs to be quite easy to get to know. All it took was time and a good amount of clicking on things to find out what they do. Also there is a really good built in help.

    If there is something you can't figure out then there is always google. Googling with keywords about what you want to do like, OSX burn cds, and you'll more than likely find what you want. This also is a good way to learn more about the os. The more you do yourself the more you learn and remember and the more you can figure things out.

    If google can't answer your question then post a query here and lots of people will be more than eager to help you.

    However i do have to repeat that googling is the best way. It WILL take longer and it WILL be harder but it will be better in the long run as you will learn more. In the long run it will make working things out yourself easier and you'll feel like you've accomplished something yourself. (Also you won't annoy people like me who hate laziness :) ).
     
  5. polevault139 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2006
    Location:
    Illinois
    #5
    Even though I think the Dock is a great thing to use. I do not think I could live without Quicksilver.

    Search the forums for other threads on software to get when you get you new machine.
    Most of all have fun with it when you get it.
     
  6. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2006
    Location:
    Tiger Mountain - WA State
    #6
    My Dad could never get comfortable using his Dell (you could just substitute any PC really). He was also getting viruses, malware, adware....I was 'cleaning' his machine constantly, while having to endure a continuous visceral monolog of why computers, technology, republicans and Texans suck. So, I installed Linux on his machine. No issues with viruses, etc. However, he just did not like it. Out of desperation, I bought him a Mini when the Yonah came out. Dead silence. I asked him how things were going from time to time. Fine, good...

    Then one day I was visiting and he was in his sewing room/office. I went in, and he was looking at system statistics. I asked him, "WHAT are you doing"? He said, "Checking my memory usage - seems to be running slow lately". I about had a seizure on the spot.

    Macs seem to inspire interest from the most unlikely places. EXPLORE!
     
  7. thesnowman16 macrumors member

    thesnowman16

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2007
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #7
    I would reromend getting an appzapper or one of the free apps that does the same thing. It's handy for a new mac user because you will probably be downloading and trying out lots of new software and will probably end up removing the stuff you don't want. Search the forums for appzapper and you will find many people talking about some of the free apps that do the same thing.
     
  8. netguy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2007
    #8
    To help the transition to OSX from Windows, dedicate yourself to the Mac and Mac only. You will find after a couple of days to a week that it gets easier to use. Then after a week or 2, you will wonder how you ever used a PC to begin with.

    I switched, and have been using Mac only now for 2 months, and PC's to me now, seem so clunky.
     
  9. Chrisqo thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2007
  10. CaptainHaddock macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2004
    Location:
    Nagoya, Japan
    #10
    I don't recommend a clean install; it's an unnecessary hassle and reflects a Windows-user mentality in my mind. Your Macbook Pro will come with a factory installation tweaked precisely for your model and ready to run out of the box.

    I suggest doing the following, in order:

    1. Install all available system updates, and avoid the urge to do much while this is happening just in case.

    2. Play with it and get a feel for how OS X is different than Windows. Throw out your old computing assumptions and do what seems logical whenever faced with a new task.

    3. Configure things to your liking: dock size and magnification, Exposé and Dashboard hotkeys or mouse buttons, Finder view settings, etc. Put folders you think you'll use a lot (like Applications) in your Dock.
     

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