New Program in Panther: ExpressStripe

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Balin64, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. Balin64 macrumors 6502a

    Balin64

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    In a Mauve Dream
    #1
    I just installed Panther. A program called ExpressStripe was installed in the Apps folder. Perhaps I have not been paying attention, but I had not heard of it. Apparently, it allows you to manage RAID set ups and you need a root account to use it.
     
  2. Balin64 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Balin64

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    In a Mauve Dream
    #2
    Here's a Screenie

    Screenie:
     

    Attached Files:

  3. yamabushi macrumors 65816

    yamabushi

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
  4. DesterWallaboo macrumors 6502

    DesterWallaboo

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2003
    Location:
    Western USA
    #4
    ATTO makes the SCSI driver for MacOS X

    Apple doesn't do any of the writing of the SCSI drivers under OS X. ATTTO Technologies has been taking care of this since the first support for SCSI under OS X. Doesn't surprise me much that ATTO's ExpressStripe is now included in the OS. It's about time too since striping using Apple's utility only allows for RAID arrays that work under OS X but not OS 9. The ExpressStripe allows you to create an array that works in OS X and OS 9 as well.
     
  5. benixau macrumors 65816

    benixau

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #5
    heres an interesting question. I have two 80GB drives with data on them. If i go and RAID 0 them (i dont back up now, why start?) will i loose all my data or will it be combined logically onto the one volume?
     
  6. G5orbust macrumors 65816

    G5orbust

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    #6
    If one drive fails, the whole RAID fails and you lose all collective data.
     
  7. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #7
    Whilst I have not tried this on a Mac (all my Macs have been laptops) in the PC world creating a RAID array completely destroys all data on the drives. Basically it's a total re-format.

    As noted above RAID 0 basically doubles your risk (but it can get you up to about 80% better disk access speeds).
     
  8. benixau macrumors 65816

    benixau

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #8
    @G5orbust:
    I understand the risks of going to RAID 0 but as i said: I don't backup now so this will not make any difference. Also, I am a FCP person. The advantage of RAID 0 over redundancy AT THIS STAGE is worth any risk.

    I also plan on upgrading the mac before disk death would likely occur.
     

Share This Page