New world record - Akira Haraguchi recites 83,431 digits of pi

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Doctor Q, Jul 3, 2005.

  1. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #1
    Now this is my kind of news story!

    News link
    It's a feat that's hard to imagine. I can't understand how Mr. Haraguchi can remember a stream of digits that long. I guess some brains just have lots of efficient RAM wired in. In any case, I'm glad to see the new record and hope the Guinness Book recognizes it.
     
  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #2
    Wow! :D :eek:

    My best friend at the time and I memorized about 60 digits of Pi when we were about 15.... :) That was a long time ago. God I was such a geek back then! :rolleyes:
     
  3. ham_man macrumors 68020

    ham_man

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    #3
    Wow. That is alot of numbers. And I thought that memorizing 30 lines for Romeo and Juliet was hard...:rolleyes:
     
  4. stubeeef macrumors 68030

    stubeeef

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    #4
    Ya I was a geek with my best friend, we would figure out many moles of bear there was in a 500# bear.
    One day on a Blue Ridge overlook we figured how many moles of trees we could see! Ya, pretty embarassing stuff, even more embarassing now, but hey I don't really know anyone here anyway.
     
  5. Doctor Q thread starter Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #5
    I've been able to recite 72 digits of pi ever since about 7th grade, although I often get the 35th digit wrong for some reason.

    Knowing that much of pi comes in handy quite often. For example, um, er, ... ok, it has never come in handy.
     
  6. noaccess macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Could there be a possibility that he only said the first about 100 digits correctly and then recited all the other stuff at random, knowing that nobody else could verify him on the spot ;) ?
     
  7. Doctor Q thread starter Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #7
    Some poor sucker probably had to check the whole thing. I wonder if they made an audio or video recording of his performance.

    Your question reminds me of how I "prove" that the digits I recite are really those of pi. First, if somebody writes down the digits and has me start over, they can confirm that I am reciting the same digits each time, which shows that I know some 72-digit number. Then I claim that if an admitted geek memorizes a 72-digit number that starts as pi does, it must actually be pi because there would be no reason to memorize any other such number!
     
  8. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

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    #8
    Impressive!

    However, I can also recite 83,431 digits of pi. Just not the first 83,431. :p
     
  9. noaccess macrumors 6502

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    #9
    Care to prove that :p ? I'll provide the coffee :)
     
  10. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

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    #10
    Anyone can recite 83,431 digits of pi, even more if you want. It's getting them in the right order that's the hard part.
     
  11. iMeowbot macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

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    #11
    Three mic booms were in the guy's face, I'd say that there was some care taken to record it.
     
  12. Loge macrumors 68020

    Loge

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    #12
    Well you can even get them in the right order without difficulty. Knowing where the sequence starts is what is hard.
     
  13. JonMaker macrumors regular

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    #13
    A wise man once defined pi as (something to the effect of) "Three, followed by as many digits as you care to employ."

    Let's see someone calcuate something practical using pi to 83431 digits... sounds like a headache to me.
     
  14. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #14
    A very impressive feat. My question would be in what form is this useful?

    We are very fortunate to have Doctor Q on our forum that can recite 72 digits of pi. ;)
     
  15. zelmo macrumors 603

    zelmo

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    #15
    Wow. To think that I was pleased when I finally memorized the 26 digit hex key for the wireless network at work, and that's something I pretty much use every day at least once.

    Very impressive...and quite pointless.
     
  16. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #16
    :D

    Actually, isn't this completely correct? It's been quite a while since I took real analysis, but my memory is that you can prove explicitly that any sequence of digits, with any contents, of any length, appears embedded within the number pi (or the number e) at some point in the sequence. The proof doesn't involve where in the sequence, though.

    I thought the general principle was that this is true of any irrational number, but I don't think that's true. It's not true of an irrational number such as 0.10100100010000100000.....
     
  17. Linkjeniero macrumors 6502

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    #17
    I think it's not true to all irrational numbers, only trascendental numbers (wich are a subset of irrational numbers).
     
  18. snkTab macrumors 6502a

    snkTab

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    #18
    I wonder if he knew the last digit he said, or if he just messed up.

    And that's a lot to say correctly. I mean, what if he knew it, but just said it wrong as sometimes happens.
     
  19. Abstract macrumors Penryn

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    #19
    I was proud to know the first 10 digits. :eek:

    Never put any real effort into it, though. I never saw the point.
     
  20. Doctor Q thread starter Administrator

    Doctor Q

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    #20
    Representing pi in base 10 is only interesting and useful because we (well, most of us) happen to have 10 fingers. If I were a mathematician studying patterns in pi, I'd study it in binary. (Although I imagine there isn't much point in studying such patterns.)
     
  21. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

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    #21
    At work, I just care to program my software to use X * (PI) when designing, and if I have time enough I could do it manually with 3,1416 ... ;), my boss would be very happy if I use the first 5 digits. :p
    Nice for this man and for Mr. Dr Q.
    I'm not lazy with numbers but I like speed and productivity. :)
     
  22. broken_keyboard macrumors 65816

    broken_keyboard

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    #22
    Me neither... he must have cheated somehow.
     
  23. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

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    #23
    Yeah, he had an in-ear phone... :eek: :)
    Gotta love 3,1416!!
     
  24. CelticBhoy macrumors member

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    #24
    This Japanese chap really needs to get out more. Unless he uses it as a chat-up line of course ......... by the time he gets to the 31416th digit I'm sure the chicks will be all over him !
     
  25. snkTab macrumors 6502a

    snkTab

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    #25
    Actually, wasn't it the Japanese who were thinking of shortening the use of pi to just 3 for math in school?
     

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