Newbie Questions. What's DRM???

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by dvader, Feb 24, 2007.

  1. dvader macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    #1
    I read about it but didn't understand how it actually worked. Is this an organization or some policy that will restrict the amount of music we're able to download?

    I don't get it :confused:
     
  2. daneoni macrumors G4

    daneoni

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    Mar 24, 2006
    #2
    Stands for Digital Rights Management. Sufficive to say, its the reason your iTunes downloads won't work on any other MP3 player and can't be re-encoded

    Wikipedia is your friend
     
  3. swiftaw macrumors 603

    swiftaw

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    Jan 31, 2005
    Location:
    Omaha, NE, USA
    #3
    DRM = Digital Rights Management


    Basically restrictions placed on media you buy so you cant spread it around.

    Apple's itunes store encodes all the things the sell with DRM meaning that you can only play it on computers you authorize, up to 5 maximum.
     
  4. iW00t macrumors 68040

    iW00t

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    #4
    Digital Restriction Management.

    You do not need your right to be managed, you should be free to do what want with what you paid for.
     
  5. dvader thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 17, 2007
    #5
    So let me see if I understand it correctly. When you can download a song from itunes onto your computer, you can also put it in 5 other ones you authorize (does that include ipods?).

    I don't understand why people have a problem with this? It prevents me from getting songs from someone else's computer into mine without ever paying for it.

    Besides, you can put it in 5 authorized computers. I can only see myself downloading the song into my computer, ipod, and possibly one other device leaving me with 2 more places to put it in.

    And yes, I tried to read about it, but I'm slow :(
     
  6. swiftaw macrumors 603

    swiftaw

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    #6
    The limit of 5 applies only to computers, ipods do not count as part of that limit.

    Note that music bought from itunes can only be played on your computer or your ipod they wont work on other devices. (You can however burn them to CD)
     
  7. suneohair macrumors 68020

    suneohair

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    Aug 27, 2006
    #7
    5 computers, unlimited iPods I believe.

    I don't particularily have a problem with it . However, I don't buy from iTunes. Unless it is an exclusive.

    I don't buy because I can buy a CD and do what I want with it. Why buy a restricted version?

    My other problem is the quality. 128 AAC is not CD quality. Give me lossless and we will talk. I would probably buy DRM music if it was lossless.

    Fact of the matter is, DRM isn't stopping anything. Read this: http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughtsonmusic/

    Thoughts on music by jobs. Good read, and sums it up. DRM isn't stopping anybody from pirating. Those who are going to steal will steal. If they open it up (and make it higher quality) they stand to sell more music than ever.

    I don't feel I should be restricted, we havent been with cds and tapes, why now?
     
  8. dvader thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 17, 2007
    #8
    I was confused about your first paragraph and its relation to the second paragraph.

    If the limit of 5 applies to computers then what stops me from downloading a song into my computer first then downloading it onto my friend's computer or laptop next. My friend's computer is one of the 5 limits. In that way, he's getting the song for free.

    Sorry for any frustrations... I'm trying to see why people hate DRM because it sounds like DRM is trying to stop people from stealing songs which is good for the music industry, no?
     
  9. richard4339 macrumors 6502a

    richard4339

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    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    Illinois
    #9
    Because it goes into fair use. Legally, if we purchase something, we own the rights to use it however we see fit. DRM takes away this right. If I want to go to my friend's computer and play him this song I purchased, and I've already used my 5 computers, I can't play it for him.

    It goes further than that, but thats the gist of the argument.
     
  10. chatster18 macrumors regular

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    Jan 14, 2007
    #10
    DRM is smart and stupid at the same time, there are many ways to get around it, so the implementation of the technology is a waste of resources IMHO.

    But as jobs states Apple will gladly sell DRM FREE music, if the "big 4" would let them...

    I personally think that would be the best alternative.
     
  11. dvader thread starter macrumors regular

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    Feb 17, 2007
    #11
    Thanks. I understand a lot better, but who are the big 4?
     
  12. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

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    Sep 22, 2006
    Location:
    Tiger Mountain - WA State
    #12
    No, you do not. You certainly should have more rights than you do. However, there needs to be some restrictions. If you were to purchase an album (see how old I am), rip a bunch of copies, and sell them to others, you are screwing the artists, producers and distributers. That is not right, and your $12 (or whatever you paid) does not begin to pay for the costs someone else paid to produce it.

    If you take the DVD set of the 'Lord of the Rings, it cost a staggering $270 Million dollars to produce. Should someone be able to and resell the DVD's for $50, or something? I can see no moral high-ground to support such a silly notion. The Chinese do not struggle with morals when it comes to business. Patents and copyrights are totally western concepts. So, the majority of the world's population is buying illegal products.

    There are a great many MR readers, members and/or posters, who advocate, or inquire about ways to steal media and/or software. Many have even suggested they have a right to do so. Fortunately, MR does a good job of policing the forums and removing posts, involving illegal procurement of SW and media. I have had my software stolen before. It is not a pleasant experience.

    I do agree with you about how restrictive SW ownership has become. We should have more rights to deploy, and use, that which we obtain legally. I like the fact I can install FCS on my WS and laptop. I also like the 'family pack' option, which Apple and various 3rd party companies offer. With the proliferation of home networks, this is a big selling point for many. It would be nice to pay an additional 25% and have Office:Mac on all my Macs. But, we are now talking MS. Squeeeeeze. :(
     
  13. apfhex macrumors 68030

    apfhex

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    Aug 8, 2006
    Location:
    Northern California
    #13
    The big four evil record groups: Sony BMG, EMI, Universal, and Warner.

    You sound like you work for the RIAA. ;) j/k

    The problem is that DRM does not prevent music (or other content) piracy. Sure it stops some casual pirates, but overall does nothing but cause a hassle for the consumer who legally purchases said items, treating them like pirates themselves.

    That said, Apple's FairPlay DRM is... fairer than a lot of the competition. Being that I use iTunes on Mac OS and Windows, plus own an iPod, I've not been restricted in my DRMed music listening as of yet.
     
  14. CaptainHaddock macrumors 6502

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    Jul 6, 2004
    Location:
    Nagoya, Japan
    #14
    You sound suspiciously like a shill for the big four music labels. Nevertheless, I'll answer.

    DRM encrypts your music, so you can't share the file with a friend, or play it on your hi-fi MP3 deck, or play it on your non-iPod portable, or use it as a ring-tone on your cell-phone, or import it into iMovie as a soundtrack for your cool snowboard video, or into Garageband to make a funky remix track. It's a fraudulent defect that adds no value for the buyer.

    DRM encrypts your movies, so you can't watch your hi-def Blu-ray disc on the 50-inch TV you just bought, or your iTunes movies on your PSP, or a DVD in Linux. It's a fraudulent defect that adds no value for the buyer.

    DRM encrypts your documents, so you can't read that eBook you just bought on the device of your choice, or print it out for off-line reading, or copy and paste quotes to that article you're working on. It's a fraudulent defect that adds no value for the buyer.

    DRM is all about trying to make you pay over and over for something you already own just because the music labels or Hollywood studios say so. These little would-be kings will not stop at mere technical DRM; their goal is a legal framework that will throw you in jail for "crimes" that hurt no one, and a society where you are spied on to make sure you don't see or hear anything that's "theirs" unless they've extracted their fee from you.

    If you're content to be a b**** for these corporate jerks, by all means play along. Enjoy the dog poop the schoolyard bully shoves in your mouth with his boot on your neck, and thank him when he tells you to.
     
  15. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    Jul 4, 2004
    #15

    Buying copyrighted material does not mean you 'own' it. That's the way it always has been, long before DRM came along... DRM merely attempts to enforce those pre-existing conditions.

    This pernicious idea that you should be free to do what you want with intellectual property seems to be particularly prevalent amongst those who create nothing for a living.
     
  16. swiftaw macrumors 603

    swiftaw

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    Omaha, NE, USA
    #16
    Because each of the 5 computers has to be connected to the account that bought the song, so unless you want to give your friend your account name and password he wont be able to play the songs you bought.
     
  17. GFLPraxis macrumors 604

    GFLPraxis

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    #17
    I have no problem with iTunes music DRM because I can burn the music to a CD or put it on my iPod or most of my computers.

    However, I get annoyed with iTunes Video DRM, because I can only use it on my computers or iPod; I can't burn it to a DVD and watch it on my TV. My Mac has a DVD burner, why can't I? Because of DRM.

    Also, people who use non-Apple MP3 players get annoyed because their iTunes music won't play.
     
  18. CaptainHaddock macrumors 6502

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    Jul 6, 2004
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    Nagoya, Japan
    #18
    So why do the commercials for new movies always say "own it today on DVD and video"?

    When I buy something at a store, I own what I bought. It's a pretty simple equation, and it's always been that way.
     
  19. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    Jul 4, 2004
    #19

    Perhaps because they're commercials and are as inherently trustworthy as implied? Anyway, it's just a little white lie. Buy the disc; yes, you own the medium, but you do not own the rights to the intellectual property contained therein. You're confusing the two.

    And no, it hasn't always been that way. You go buy a book, you have no right to copy it, lend it to others for money, etc. Why do you think libraries pay duties to copyright associations and performing rights societies? This concept has been enshrined in British law for the past 300 years or so according to Wikipedia, and the Berne Convention has been around since the late 1800s.

    Intellectual property, be they copyright, patents etc. — and the concept of rights — means ownership of the creative work, not your right to do whatever you please with it.

    And besides, the concept or defense of 'fair use' is intended for those quoting excerpts for scholarship or for review, not for you to take copyrighted material and use it for your own purposes.
     
  20. emac82 macrumors 6502

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    Feb 17, 2007
    Location:
    NB, Canada
    #20
    I read in MacWorld last week about a woman in the US who is suing Apple because the music she bought from iTunes won't play on other mp3 players. Apparently it violates anti-trust laws something.

    I have to somewhat agree...When you pay $.99 for a song at iTunes, you should be paying for the right to use that song on any of your devices. It lets you burn it to a CD to play it in any CD player, so why does it matter if someone wants to put it on their Creative Zen? They still got the sale on the song, right? I can buy a whole album for $9.99 (from iTunes), or I could go to the store and pay a few dollars more to buy the actual CD and I could use that CD to play anywhere's I want, and I could upload it to my computer and put those songs on any MP3 player I want, and the CD is higher quality.

    I live in Canada, and it is still not illegal to download music from the likes of Limewire etc....this DRM will want to make people keep "stealing" music instead of paying for it, or they will continue to buy the CD in the store.
     
  21. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #21
    If I buy a CD, should I be able to sue the record companies because I can't play it on a tape deck?
     
  22. emac82 macrumors 6502

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    #22
    Sorry..I should have specified that if I buy an MP3 song that I should be able to play it on ANY MP3 device.
     
  23. fistful macrumors 6502a

    fistful

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    Socan
    #23
    Apple does not sell MP3's, they sell AAC's. Unless that Creative Zen supports ACC it wouldn't play even without the DRM anyways.
     
  24. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    Jul 4, 2004
    #24

    Should? Perhaps.

    But that's not in the license agreement, i.e. the small print, when you buy a DRM AAC file from the iTunes Music Store. It's not an MP3. If you want something without DRM, buy the CD and rip it anyway you like. You have choices... I have choices, and I exercise that choice by not putting a single iTMS song on my computer or iPod.

    All this stuff about suing Apple really annoys me, Microsoft-based solutions are equally as about locking you in and excluding others, as we in the UK are now finding out with video on demand services from various broadcasters.

    The song might be the product but the lock-in is in the container, the medium, the vehicle.

    Let's take more examples: printer ink, vacuum cleaner bags, razor blades and handles... all locked into each manufacturer's proprietary systems. Yet we don't go around suing Gillette because you can't use your Wilkinson Sword blade on a Gillette handle. But you do have a choice about which razor to use...

    It might be unfair, but who said life was fair?
     
  25. emac82 macrumors 6502

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    NB, Canada
    #25
    Yeah, you are right. I forgot all about AAC. I don't buy music from iTunes so I have never had anything but an MP3.
     

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