Nikon Coolpix 4200 or D70

Discussion in 'Buying Tips, Advice and Discussion (archive)' started by iBook, Sep 3, 2004.

  1. iBook macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    On a tugboat
    #1
    I know, I know. Two very different cameras.

    Both would suit my needs and my abilities as a photographer. I just think the 4200 is more practical; the D70 more provocative.

    Anyone with experience with both cameras that could provide insight? I currently have a Coolpix 950, so either camera is a definite improvement.

    Thanks.
     
  2. swannman macrumors newbie

    swannman

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    #2
    D70 is worth the price

    I'm the proud new owner of a D70 and it's worth the money. This is my first time using an SLR camera (just graduated from college and decided now's a good time to get into the hobby) but you can see some sample pics here:

    http://homepage.mac.com/swannman/PhotoAlbum6.html

    and

    http://homepage.mac.com/swannman/PhotoAlbum7.html

    None of the photos have been retouched, so many of them are underexposed or suffer from similar flaws. My lack of photographic skill notwithstanding, it's a tremendous camera with tremendous capabilities. If you're looking for something that's an "open box" with a multitude of possibilities for the future, the D70 is it. Want to learn how various lenses affect your shot? Want to experiment with filters? Want to learn to control every last detail of your photographic experience? Want it to be rugged enough to perform well even in rain in downtown Seattle? The D70 is well worth the money if you're in the prosumer category and want to learn to take good photos.

    Feel free to shoot me an email (should be in my profile) if you have more questions or want to see full 2.5 MB photos straight from the camera. Good luck making your decision!
     
  3. matthewr macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2004
    #3
    Another Vote for the D70

    I agree with swanman - the D70 is an absolutely incredible camera. I have owned 4 different digicams and the D70 is far superior to all of them (including my sony 717). Some pictures taken with the D70 can be found at:

    http://www.fotolog.net/matthewr

    Feel free to e-mail me if you have any questions about it.
     
  4. vkapoormd macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #4
    i agree with the 2 above; i also have the D70 (previously had the coolpix 995, coolpix 5700, canon powershot G3, and now the D70. If you are just doing just straight point and shoot, you would probably be fine with 4200 (but for that price range, go with the canon G3-it takes beautiful pics); but if you, like me, want to explore and get more experienced with Photography and such, go for the D70; you have much more control, a multitude of options, and better feeling camera. Where i think it really shines though, is closer up protrait photography; even in the full auto mode, some of the pictures are amazing and have life-like realness and professional look to them, much more so than any point and shoot. Good luck.
     
  5. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #5
    I love my D70 - but I was a longtime user of film SLRs, and found the things the point-and-shoot digitals couldn't do were very annoying (even though the picture quality can be quite good). If you haven't used an SLR before, then there's less of an argument for dropping $1300 on a DSLR.
     
  6. quackattack macrumors 6502a

    quackattack

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    #6
    The D70 is amazing, but you can't put it in your pocket. You got to decide, portability or creative control?. If you have the $$ I'd say D70. But the cameras are so different its really what you want it for. Both are great for what they do respectively.
     
  7. iBook thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Location:
    On a tugboat
    #7
    Thanks for your perspective.

    I can afford both cameras, so money isn't a factor per se. Obviously, I'd rather spend $500 than $1300, but I also don't want to overspend my abilities. I have years of SLR and digital point-and-shoot experience, so I'm confident I could make good photographs with each.

    Then I start thinking: If I'm going to spend $500 for a good camera, shouldn't I spend a bit more and get a really good camera? Unfortunately, I haven't used either camera.

    Portability is a concern. I like the idea of dropping the camera in my pocket when I travel vs. being concerned about turning the wrong way at the wrong time and hitting the lens.

    Most of the photos I'd take would be printed in the 4x6 or 5x7 range. Not sure how many times I would utilize the D70's 24x36 capabilities.
     
  8. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #8
    It's kind of funny because my SLR was a Pentax K-1000. I loved it to death, but it was auto-nothing (all it had was a through-the-lens light meter, which worked very well). So with the D70 I'm not so much learning how to use an SLR as how to use a fancy SLR that actually does a lot of stuff for you. :D

    A couple things about the D70 that you may already be aware of. First, when they say there's no delay turning it on, they are not exaggerating. Flip the switch take a picture (er, make that flip the switch, take the lens cap off, THEN take the picture). Also, the kit lens is pretty sweet - very sharp and a nice 28-105 range (35mm equivalent). Plus what I really like is the lens lets you manually override the focus on the fly at any time, without having to switch it to manual mode first. Not that you'd normally need that since the autofocus is very fast and seems quite accurate.

    Of course if you've already invested in Nikon SLR lenses you're set because they intentionally used the same mount; unlike say the Canon Digital Rebel (which is still supposed to be a very nice camera).

    The other thing that you're probably aware of is it'll really take advantage of a fast CF card. You can get a Lexar 80x 1G card for something like $169 at some places.

    Oh, and the display screen on the back is just like the display screen on a fancy SLR - meaning you can't use it for framing/focussing like you could on a point-and-shoot digital. This didn't bother me because that was one of the things I HATE about digital cameras. :p Give me a viewfinder with TTL focussing any day!
     

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