Norton is the biggest waste of money

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by TigerPRO, Nov 13, 2003.

  1. TigerPRO macrumors 6502

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    #1
    My advice to every Mac OS X user is to never purchase, barrow, steal, or take a donation of any copy of "Norton Antivirus". The program is like a virus itself. It integrates itself with the deepest corners of your OS and impedes with anything it possibly can (from FPC to iChat); conflicting, messing with, and destroying. Also, if your looking for a program to throttle down your system preformance, get Norton.

    "Using Norton with Mac OS X is like carrying an umbrella in the Arabian desert."

    There are practically no viruses for OS X, and even if there was "one", it would not have anyway of traveling and spreading. In fact, I don't even think you need Norton if you're a pathetic PC user. I wasted five years of my life on that platform and never had a single issue; even with a broadband connection. As long as you're careful, and don't download strange attachments from people you don't know, you'll never have a problem. The only thing Norton does is bring peace of mind to people don't know any better.

    Any agreements, disagreements, or comments? If you've had a computer pull a norton on you, let us know about that too.
     
  2. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    :noitаɔo˩
    #2
    Re: Norton is the biggest waste of money

    What if I'm given money to use it?:p

    I don't think your analogy is a good one here: I would find an umbrella real usefull in the Arabian desert, it would protect me from the sun...

    Back to topic, are you just fed up with N. Antivirus, or with all Norton software (namely System Utilities)?
     
  3. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

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    San Francisco
    #3
    I agree with your point that Norton has no place on the Mac platform. It's useless. Quite frankly, I'm amazed they even spent time developing it. I guess its all those people who don't know anything about their computers "and need anti-virus".

    I do believe Norton has a place in the Windows world though. Even if you are carfeul, accidents do happen. Norton can really save your behind if you get infected.
     
  4. raiderz182 macrumors regular

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    north philly
    #4
    dude!, i totally agree, and i need your help guys. how the hell do i uninstall this thing completely
     
  5. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Norton is Trash

    You couldn't pay me to use it. Unless you paid me enough buy and operate a separate Mac to run it on.

    True, but it's not serving it's original purpose (the umbrella). The Norton does do you some good: how about a sources of laughter, or even a nice yard ornament?

    I have not not tried Norton Utilities. I'm not biased against norton, so I won't blast that without at least trying it first. When I do, then I will. But not until then.

    I actually have never had Norton on my Mac. I've seen it in action on PCs though. But I have had strong second had experience with it from a close friend. We are always having problems using iChat (that stupid firewall), and he has his own little batch of issues internally. It's just nasty, pointless, and everything bad.
     
  6. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Format and reinstall Mac OS X. lol.

    Just kidding, although the above will work as well. I believe there is an uninstall program. If not, delete all program files and remove anything from the "Log-on Items". However, I also think there is some system level integration. I'm not sure how to get rid of that. Anyone else know?
     
  7. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

    Joined:
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    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #7
    Yes, my question is why I should install any virus-protection program on my new Apple laptop. Is there any conceivable way whatsoever at all that my laptop can be infected? I couldn't convince the Windows IT folks that the Macintosh platform is virus free, and since I am rather certain that I won't get a virus I said that I had virex so that they would let me onto the network. If there is even the slightest chance that my Mac can get a virus that a virus protection program can stop, I will make the investment, but I'm thinking that my computer will be virus free without the added protection.
     
  8. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Yeah, I probably took that a little to far. There are many brain dead users that will always need software like this in the windows world. But for me, it would have been pointless. Viruses don't just automatically infect your system. you have to actually initiate it yourself. This is the overly common scenario anyway.
     
  9. woodsey macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2001
    #9
    In my opinion, dont bother with any anti virus software. Its all just more trouble than its worth. My dad has been running his business on mac (five macs) for the last 10 years, swapping files, downloading attatchments. never used any anti virus software, and never had downtime, corupted files, etc. due to a virus.

    If you are worried, just make sure you backup regularly!
     
  10. King Cobra macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    #10
    Well, after reviewing this thread, I have found that, neglecting the point of the software being an anti-virus program, I have located exactly ZERO specific explanations as to how, as TigerPRO claims, a Mac user would experience the effects of Norton Utilities "like a virus itself" and "impedes with anything it possibly can (from FPC to iChat); conflicting, messing with, and destroying."

    There are Mac viruses for OS X, just as there are for all operating systems, but the Mac OS X viruses are less common than most other OS viruses. So my question is: If one were to purchase Norton Utilities for OS X in the event that a virus inhabits a Mac (or even a PC for that matter), what problems would Norton Utilities generate as an anti-virus program?
     
  11. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #11
    Well..

    I most certainly would not. There are no circulating viruses for mac. According to Symantec's website, there is only one active virus for Mac OS X! If I can easily survive 70,000+ viruses on the windows platform, I can certainly "dodge" one. I'm going to try and find that page where I read that and post it here.

    The only way you are going to get that one virus is if you try for the next three years to find it and download it. And I can assure you, this isn't going to happen "by accident".

    I hereby make a challenge: has anyone running Mac OS X ever experienced a virus, or detected and prevented one with virus prevention software?

    We are probably going to get zero replies to that challenge. But if we where running this forum on a windows site, we would have to shut down the server because of a posting overflow.
     
  12. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
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    Gone but not forgotten.
    #12
    I agree that Symantec's Norton products are pretty much useless. I say this after owning Norton Utilities for Mac from version 3.5 to version 6. CrashGuard was something new in one of those old releases. It crashed my machine much more often than anything else on the machine.

    There are good reasons for anti-virus software on Macintosh.

    1. You use Microsoft Office and macros.

    2. You receive from and send e-mail to Windows users.

    I'm sure there are a couple of UNIX/Linux viruses still out there but I don't think that we have to worry. However, should Mac OS X become really popular because hardware has become cheaper, we may be in need of protection.

    TigerPRO:
    Considering that the word umbrella means little shadow, it's just as logical to assume that its (not it's) original purpose was to shield someone from the sun. ;)
     
  13. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Wisconsin
    #13
    I did mention iChat. But here is the specific situation. While trying to do a simple iChat video conference over the internet, my friend (running norton something) was unable to make it work. Apparently the norton firewall was blocking our transmission. We tried to turn it off, open up the ports, and even allow all traffic! But the problem continued. It was only solved by removing the entire program from his system. Also, FCP has frequent clashes with norton. Search for norton on the Apple support forum website and enjoy some rather unpleasant reading.

    It may be that all virus programs impede with the system. Because virus detection is a very system intimate process, and is bound to conflict with things. I've always hated virus programs like norton. They constantly bother you with there retarded subscriptions. One time, I started to notice how sluggish my system was, so I check the activity monitor. Sure enough, norton was doing some retarded full system virus scan, slowing my system usability to a baby crawl.

    In the end, all this trouble is not worth it when you consider there is only one active virus for Mac OS X, and you'll never get it! Norton is a waste of time, money, and stress.

    Try 70,000 times on for size. This is what you meant by "less common".
     
  14. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #14
    Found Something

    "Mac OS X hasn't had any viruses since the OS was launched," says Bill Rosenkrantz, the head of Macintosh products at Symantec, the big antivirus firm. "It's more difficult to attack the Apple system than Windows."

    http://ptech.wsj.com/archive/ptech-20031023.html

    For good article. Check it out.
     
  15. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #15
    If norton does protect against macro viruses, then it could be of some use. But I still need to highly weigh those rare problems against the high level of disadvantages you also get from installing norton.

    I guess that really does not apply to me, maybe it would for others. But I don't download office documents on the internet anyway. For me, they're just personal, and I don't get them from unknown people who would do nasty things. Aside from the fact the average user never uses macros (even knows what they are). I leave it turned off myself.

    If you forward emails, that's because you did it. I simply don't forward emails for no reason that have unknown attachments. Doesn't seem like a complicated reason to install a beast like norton that will take over your system. Let these poor windows users get a Mac.
     
  16. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

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    Nov 9, 2003
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    Dress Rosa
    #16
    Anti-virus programs are a joke. I never once installed them. I even thought they were a joke back when I used a PC. Anti-virus programs are a menace. Over half of the people on my floor who've had computer problems have been due to the anti-virus programs themselves. Now whenever someone has a computer problem I ask, "Have you installed an anti-virus program lately?" Then I uninstall it and that usually fixes the problem.
     
  17. Makosuke macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #17
    PC users, particularly those stuck in idiot corporate environments that use MS Outlook (greatest tool ever invented to assist virus writers), have a reason to install virus software. In the small lab I manage, it's less of an issue, but thanks to things like the recent huge holes in Windows, keeping some virus software installed is a good idea even if your users aren't idiots (and we have, indeed, had computers infected--computers that did not have e-mail software installed at all, and no one used as a workstation). At least the corporate version of McAffee we use is unobtrusive and hasn't caused any issues yet.

    Virus software on the Mac, however, seems to be an effective tool to take money from the paranoid. I'll admit to its effectiveness in getting rid of Word macro viruses (gee, thanks, Microsoft, we really needed a cross-platform method of spreading viruses), although even those were mainly an issue when e-mailing accidentally infected attachments to PC users (the only infection I ever saw on a Mac wasn't capable of doing anything but infecting new documents).

    I suppose if you pass attachments from PC users along to other PC users, it might be polite to have something running as well--you're immune personally, but they might not be.

    For the rest of us, though, it's just a waste of money, and Symantec's notoriously invasive system extensions (Norton Utilities extensions have caused problems since long before OSX) cause far more problems than they fix--instability and application incompatibilities, at the very least.

    The last Macintosh virus that I ever remember doing anything in the wild was an autostart worm that got onto a bunch of CDs and installers about five years ago. I never saw it myself, and it did no damage that I know of other than spread itself. It was the first virus I'd seen in a couple years, and the last one I've even heard of.

    Who knows, maybe there are some nasty trojans if you surf Warez sites (I've at least heard rumors of those), but for the rest of us it's just not an issue at this point. Hope it stays that way, too.
     
  18. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #18
    Excellent composition dude.

    Everyone should read this post.
     
  19. sahnert macrumors 6502

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    Oct 20, 2003
    Location:
    Seattle
    #19
    I am on a Windows dominated campus and was not allowed onto the nework without having NAV installed on my PB. Thankfully the college supplied a copy so I didn't have to shell out on my own. I havn't had anyproblems with it so far but agree that it's a total waste.
    I would never pay for the program myself.
     
  20. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 27, 2003
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    Wisconsin
    #20
    That's a shame. If I was you, I'd go tell there IT guys how ignorant and foolish they are about the immunity of OS X. This is the one thing that irritates me. People who don't know the power of X, and insist on silly PC level problem prevention.
     
  21. ckwm macrumors member

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    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #21
    I'll put my hand up and admit to having NAV on my machine. I switched from Windows 2000 and you just automatically do it! After a couple of months I thought: why do I have this thing? Then I thought: why do they make this thing? I guess they make it to sell to switchers!!

    I'm not aware of any conflict problems, but I'm getting rid of it anyway. And I'll not be putting it on my wife's new iBook.

    Oh, and I never got a virus on my PC either - so a total waste of money! But then I'm not so naive as to open every email that lands in my inbox.
     
  22. CrackedButter macrumors 68040

    CrackedButter

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    Jan 15, 2003
    Location:
    51st State of America
    #22
    Luckily my college only has 5 pc's or 5 pc's that i have seen. The rest are macs, we have nearly over a 150, ranging from imacs to G4 powermacs. Some of the IT staff have PowerBooks, iBooks.

    However, there only seems to be about 20 OSX users and me the only panther user at the moment. The college is still on OS9.:(

    BTW, this view of college life could be baised because i'm in an Art and Design college!
     
  23. TigerPRO thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #23
    They should upgrade. it won't even cost them that much. Besides the fact theat OS9 is not truely Apple. It's to old!
     
  24. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    Location:
    London, England
    #24
    AnitVirus for OS X is pointless IMO, however, Symantec (Norton) AntiVirus Corporate kicks on Windows, best AV EVER!
     

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