Obama official: He's Running in '08

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Mike Teezie, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. Mike Teezie macrumors 68020

    Mike Teezie

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    #1
  2. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

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    Agreed. I'm looking forward to hearing him further clarify and articulate his position, hopefully stirring up some good debate along the way.
     
  3. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    Along with Hilary Clinton and John Edwards, the Democratic Presidential race is going to interesting.

    By 'interesting' I mean that they have three very strong candidates.
     
  4. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    Yes, they do, though I'm not sure about Edwards. He was certainly way too conservative for me and others last time around (though not in the Leiberman sense!). Still, Obama is having an effect I have never seen in my short time in the US - he is interesting to young people. Apparently one of the hottest reads around campus among undergrads is his autobiography! Whether that translates into votes, we'll see, but since we're talking Iowa here, I'd say it's a good sign for him.

    Meant to add: I think Obama's political survival is going to hinge on how he deals with the controversies. Wesley Clark's inexperience really crippled him when he was faced with questions on abortion, if you remember.
     
  5. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    I caught the second half of his speech on CNN this morning, and it was an excellent one. Between that, and his famous DNC 04 speech, he seems like a candidate who's truly in it for the people and not for the power. He's very charismatic and I think he's got a shot. People like him, and that's exactly what a candidate needs.

    I don't think the lack of experience hurts, in fact, it may be helpful. It seems like the longer you spend in politics, the more corrupt you get, and Obama is someone who hasn't been around long enough to let big corporations and lobbyists fill his wallet and buy his vote.

    I just hope race isn't an issue. I shouldn't even have to mention it, but we're 100 years behind the rest of the world when it comes to race and equality. But....I think Obama even said it himself: The people who wouldn't vote for someone due to the color of their skin are people who wouldn't vote Democratic anyways.

    He's got my vote when the Missouri primaries come around in a little more than a year. And hopefully I'll be able to vote for him in November 2008 and 2012.
     
  6. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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  7. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #7

    From today's Independent front page article:

    The Great Black Hope - Independent
     
  8. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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  9. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    i hope not. i'd much rather have Obama get the nomination.
     
  10. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    I'm not sure if you guys know this or not, but as someone who has worked in Washington, I'm always surprised at how much one speech can make or break one's reputation. I personally feel like Obama's decision to run for POTUS is premature, he is, after all, only a junior senator. Additionally, each time that I've met Obama in person, he's never made much of an impression on me. He's also an average public speaker, although he is amazing when he delivers a well practiced speech. Hiliary on the other hand, has the presence and political clout to make it all happen. A few of my professors were on her husband's cabinate and one was infact his national security adviser.
     
  11. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    another saturday announcement. is this en vogue?
     
  12. PlaceofDis macrumors Core

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    if speech performances were what made a president, then how did Bush get elected twice?
     
  13. FleurDuMal macrumors 68000

    FleurDuMal

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    Good luck to him. I'll certainly be backing him.

    There was an interesting report on him today on British TV. It said that the Afro-American community (in the least monolithic sense) were actually more behind Clinton that Obama, the latter not being black enough and suspicious of how he has become so popular in mainstream, white politics.

    Will America ever sort out the black/white thing?
     
  14. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    #14
    Speech performance really is the ability for the man running to relate to the common man. Bush had that folksy charm that the working people of American just loved! His first opponent was Albert Gore, who at the time had zero charisma. His second opponent was John Kerry, who while being a decent speaker, comes from too much of an elite family background to be taken in with comfort with the American people. :apple:

    Another issue with Obama is his blackness. Now, being an Asian American, if a minority ever gets in to office, I'd throw a party. However, after working in Washington, I felt a very subtle but present racist attitude amongst many of the whites there. It ranges from use "your people this and that" to things like "well, the Chinese make great engineers, why are you here?" I've lived in very upper middle class WASP suburbs all my life and have never really experience racism as I did in DC. So, I'm not sure if DC is ready for a minority POTUS quiet yet.

    My personal gripe with Obama is his lack of experience and seemingly juvinile notions on forigen policy. Having worked at a forigen policy thank tank, it makes me kind of nervous to have a man so inexperienced international diplomacy led the nation. However, if I can see in to the future and see that he picks a good cabinet and shows that he listens to them, I'd be working the polling stations at his campaign. Personally, I like Hilliary because many of my professors were her husband's former advisers and they're sense of policy and economics is very solid. Well, my two cents at least.
     
  15. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    Will Britain ever sort out the marginalized brown people in their country? Nearly every industrialized country has their racial problems, some just talk about it less than others.
     
  16. leekohler macrumors G5

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    I certainly don't think he could do worse than Bush. Talk about juvenile. ;)
     
  17. FleurDuMal macrumors 68000

    FleurDuMal

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    As we're not talking about a British candidate for Prime Minister, it'd be a waste to talk about representation of ethnic minorities in British politics.

    British people have no qualms with talking about their racial problems, its just unfortunate that in the most public forums those who talk about it use the debate as a means to an often more dubious and often sinister end.
     
  18. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    I will say this much... no matter who leads america, many in the world will always be pissed at our forigen policy. However, Bush and his Neocon cronies are hands down the worst of the bunch. It's gonna take a genius or a group of genius advisors to right the wrongs and I simply don't see that kind of genius in Obama's speech. Even as a Foreign Policy simpleton.... A lowly degree in Political Science... I can see that a lot of his FP ideas are overly idealistic. Although to be fair, I've only personally spoken with him once for about 13 minutes -ish.
     
  19. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    Right. I think the issue of experience, political or otherwise, can easily be over-thought and over-analyzed. John Kennedy had little political experience when he was elected president, and Robert Kennedy even less when he was running in (and almost certainly would have won) the '68 Democratic primary.
     
  20. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    In many ways a good President is really a man who's good at picking good staff. Kennedy had decent policy advisers in the FP department, thus at the very least he dealt with Cuba semi-effectively. When it comes to Forgien policy, I'm non partisan... Nixon on the other hand, had a GREAT man as his FP advisor. Readig about the way Kissinger opened up China was like seeing theoretical political science text like Barrington Moore's Evolution vindicated.
     
  21. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    So he wasn't hatched fully grown? So what?

    I very well remember the first time I heard George W. Bush asked difficult questions in an interview, while he was running for the nomination in 2000. His answers were so obviously muddled and poorly informed, you could see that the interviewer (Jim Lehrer) was having a hard time hiding his astonishment. My thought was, "this man is running for president?" Oh yes, and winning it too.

    Time will tell if Obama has the stuff. But my God, Bush set the intellectual, experience and knowledge bar so low that I can only cringe when I hear Obama being criticized for being some sort of neophyte who might not be a rhetorical genius. Get real!
     
  22. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #22
    and that being said, it's pretty obvious the gop (at least right now) looks like they are certainly headed for defeat in '08

    but that's not a stretch since i saw the dems win the elections in 60 and 64
    gop took 68 and 72
    dems took 76
    gop took 80, 84, and 88
    dems took 92 and 96
    gop took 2000 and 2004

    see a trend?

    gone are the days where one party dominates 20 years like the dems did with roosevelt from '33 to '45, and truman from '45 to '53
     
  23. yojitani macrumors 68000

    yojitani

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    #23
    Are you kidding??! Bush DOESN'T come from an elite family??? What you are saying is purely PR. I don't think it's Bush's 'folksy charisma' that got him elected by working people. Look to the prevalence of social conservatism for GOP popularity... that's why Clinton went over so well: a social conservative who appeared to favor social-democratic economics (even though we all know he was as Liberal as a republican).

    Thankfully Washington doesn't vote for the entire nation.

    You are upfront about your bias. Personally, I would be glad to be rid of Clinstonianism as much as Bushism. Perhaps the US is not ready for a real left-wing, but I'd be glad to see one. Obama, IMHO, seems like to be 'left enough' for now.
     
  24. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #24
    The thing that bothers me about Hillary, is that, even though I think she'd make a great president, I'm bothered by the fact, that should she get 2 terms, this country would've been ran by the same 2 families for 28 years. This isn't a monarchy. We need a fresh set of faces and ideas in the white house. Should she win the Dem nomination, I would definitely vote for her (unless Giuliani won the Repub nomination and didn't move further to the right), but that's one of the many reasons I'm voting for Obama in the MO primaries next year.
     
  25. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    #25


    I think Bush's folksyness was what got him elected in the working class and toss up states during the first election... second election was both that aforementioned issue and security.

    Clinton was a social centrist and a economic conservative. Really, you won't find many American policy makers asking the government to implement a single pay health system or anything like that. Clinton's adviser on e. asian foregin trade was my international econ seminar professor actually, I'm inclined to agree with his pro Globalization/ Free trade stance with minimal lasifaire in terms of international trade. Granted, I don't think a single candidate for the presidency in '08 will stray too far from that line.
     

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