Obtain more than 3 computers for itune...!

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Wotan, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. Wotan macrumors newbie

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    #1
    New at this things

    Is there a way to hear my downloaded itunes songs in more than 3 computers at the same time?

    Can I burn some downloaded songs into a regular CD and then get them back in as regular mp3?

    And third, does the sound changes in mp3 and aac?
     
  2. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    #2
    Re: Obtain more than 3 computers for itune...!

    No, not the protected files. That said...

    Yes, you can. You'll loose a bit of quality, but it works.

    I assume you're asking if there's a difference in quality between the two formats. The answer is "Yes, for the most part." At the same bitrate (128kbps in the case of Apple store bought tunes), an AAC will almost always sound better than an MP3 at the same bitrate. People usually say that a 164 or 192kpbs MP3 is about the same as a 128kbps AAC file, which is at least sort of true.

    In any case, though, if you go from one format to another, you'll loose quality. In your case, that sounds like it'd mean ripping an audio CD you burned from an AAC into MP3, which will loose you some quality no matter what bitrate you rip the song at. Ripping as an AAC would help, but you'll still loose quality in the conversion process.
     
  3. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #3
    AAC..?

    Thank you…!!!, now can you tell me something else?, does AAC is a format own by Apple, did they created it? Because is this is true, then all AAC are protected? Or AAC is just some other kind of compression (assuming that is what it is) like mp3?

    If this “mp3” “mp4” “aac” are compression?, then when I burn a CD to be listened on my car, “a regular CD” what is it called, what is that format? Or there is non format on those CD, they are purse sound. Maybe what I am asking is that If to put music into a computer always needs to have some compression, couldn’t we just copied exactly, isn’t both digitals?

    I bet you must be laughing at this time so hard by the mess I have in my mind, but this is what happens when I was introduce to computers very late.
     
  4. Wes macrumors 68020

    Wes

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    #4
    Re: AAC..?

    mp4 is Mpeg Layer 4 Encoding for movies, AAC is the audio part of this encoding.

    Music cds are in AIFF, a format with no compression.
     
  5. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

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    #5
    You can also convert .m4p files to Aiff with iMovie.
     
  6. Totalshock macrumors member

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    #6
    Re: AAC..?

    AAC is an audio format from MPEG4. I believe Dolby Labs was the lead on developing the standard, if I'm not mistaken. Like MP3, it is a format for compressing audio with a minimized loss of information that makes up the nuances of the sound recorded.

    The only part Apple owns, or created directly itself, is the copy protection which is on songs you download from their music store, which limits you to playin back on an iPod, and any of three "authorized" machines, or burning to CD.

    If you take a CD of your songs, and rip them in AAC format, they are 100 per cent copy protection free -- you can play them on any computer you choose, or... umm... do what you will wth them. At least from a technical point of view. The RIAA might have some ideas about what you can and cannot do from a legal point of view.

    When you put tracks on an audio CD, they are recorded in an AIFF format, which is 100 per cent un-compressed, and is the reason why you can only fit 80 minutes or so of music on a CD, as opposed to the hundreds upon hundreds of song you could store on a CD in MP3 or AAC format.

    You could put all of your music on your hard drive in AIFF format, but the fact that they're uncompressed means you need a boatload of storage to do so. So MP3/AAC are "compromises." The trick is to minmize the amount of information lost while compressing the sound, and trying to ditch only parts of the total recording that you can't really hear all that well.

    How much compression impacts your music-listening experience depends on a number of factors -- how picky you are, how good your sense of hearing is, the equipment you use to play.

    Myself, I'm hearing-challenged, with crappy equipment and I don't really notice much of the stuff a lot of people talk about sound, so hell... 128-bit AAC from a good source sounds AMAZING to me!
     
  7. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    #7
    Re: AAC..?

    As Wes said, AAC is one (currently the only, but that won't necessarily always be true) audio compression system used by MP4. Although Apple was involved in the MP4 standard, they do not own it, nor did they create it. It isn't an open standard in that it's not open source that anybody and everybody can use and mess with freely, but it is accepted by a standards body that any company has access to.

    Protected AAC, which is what the iTMS uses when you buy music, is, however, Apple specific (so far as I know, anyway--they're certainly the only company using it). Not all AAC files are protected, though--only the ones you buy from Apple. If you create an AAC file yourself from a CD you own, it's as open as MP3, though there are less players for the format.

    Wes wasn't exactly correct on his answer to this question. Audio CDs, which is what iTunes burns and you play in your car, do NOT use AIFF audio encoding; they use a raw, uncompressed audio stream that I believe is technically called PCM. This is close to what you meant by "pure sound", although ANY digital data contains a format of some sort--"format" just means a way of organizing digital data. For all practical purposes, the format of audio CDs is called exactly that: "Audio CD".

    In answer to the second half of that question, and what Wes was getting at, you CAN import uncompressed audio into your computer, and the format Macs usually use to do that is called AIFF. An AIFF file can contain several types of compressed audio, but in this case people ususally use them for an exact, uncompressed copy of a CD--identical to the original.

    The reason to compress audio when you import it into your computer is size; an uncompressed CD worth of audio will take up about 600MB of space on your hard drive or iPod, but the same thing compressed into an MP3 or AAC file that sounds almost the same to most people only takes about 60MB.

    There are some people who are very picky about their audio who actually use uncompressed audio on their computers, but most people are perfectly happy with MP3s or AAC files.
     
  8. Wes macrumors 68020

    Wes

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    #8
    Re: Re: AAC..?

    Agree 100%, this explains why a mac says it's AIFF, and windows calls it a .wav when imported.
     
  9. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #9
    Wes and Makosuke and Totalshock...!!!!

    Wow….!!! I feel great, you guys just save me days of reading, in particular you where very very “clear” but now it made me generate new questions, so here I go….. ;-)

    I have like 3000 songs on my computer, most of them on mp3, others I imported them on various computers that after reading what you wrote, then I don’t have a clue in what format thouse computers normally compressed, and then I have all this others songs, the ones I downloaded from Mac Store (the protected ones), and the questions is about this last group…

    How can I get, find, locate all this “protected AAC” Songs on my computer?. Is there a way to ask Sherlock, or some other simple way to do this, than, to go under the file and sub-files of the iTunes (witch are millions) to find witch songs have the extension “AAC protected”? by the way I don’t have the folder of “purchased music anymore”.

    Second Question…

    You said I could make AIFF music from imovie? Is it just music or is it a whole project? I tried to cut a song (mp3) in imovie to then put that sound into my “mail software” (library/sound/….mp3) so that I will have that peace of sound turn on with my mail arriving but it seemed I just fail on my attempts do you have any idea why? Is it the format?

    Thank you guys in advance…
     
  10. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #10
    Re: Wes and Makosuke and Totalshock...!!!!

    protected songs have the .m4p suffix. the AACs you've ripped end in .m4a.
     
  11. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #11
    Zimv20

    Thanks, I found them by .m4p (I wish by changing manualy the last "p" for an "a" would do the trick.. :mad:-)

    "MPEG" do you have any idea what does this letters stands for?

    When I download music from the Mac Store, do they come in 128 kbps? how do I know that?
     
  12. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #12
    Re: Re: Re: AAC..?

    If I put an PCM Audio CD in my computer the extention of the files is .CDA,. I burn CD's from a .wav file:confused: to many file extensions for the same thing:p

    That's why laserdisc sounds so much better than DVD because they use PCM audio, not a compressed format.
     
  13. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #13
    Re: Zimv20


    Moving Picture Experts Group
     
  14. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #14
    PCM?

    And PCM Audio CD (what does PCM stands for?)
     
  15. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #15
    Re: Zimv20

    motion pictures expert group

    'get info' in itunes will tell you that. also, it's the only sample rate apple currently offers. (i wish they offered higher -- disk space is cheap)
     
  16. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    #16
    Re: PCM?

    Pulse Code Modulation

    That's not exactly true; there's no point in turning this into a home theater nut's discussion, but although older LDs use uncompressed PCM (basically CD) audio, Dolby Digital and DTS both provide high quality compresson at fairly high bitrates and 5.1 or 7.1 channels of audio. It's all subjective, but since newer LDs used Dolby Digital or DTS soundtracks, both of which were at lower bitrates than those available on DVDs, LDs rarely if ever sound better.
     
  17. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #17
    Cut a Piece of Song into mp3 or AAC or Aiff...


    How can I cut a "piece" of a song? what program will do this for me? because when I did it with imovie i got a whole project, not just the song?

    Is there a free program to edit this songs "mp3 or AAC" to latter used for my mail?
     
  18. unc32 macrumors regular

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    #18
    to convert to aiff you can use itunes. preferences -> import -> encode as aiff.

    Then select the song you want and convert to aiff. done.
     
  19. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #19
    But just a part of if, "Cuting it", Like editing the song. Taking just few seconds of it, then "SAve as" a new song. Then use thouse seconds for my Mail... How can I do that?
     
  20. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    #20
    Two ways that I know of:

    1) Get Quicktime Pro ($30 and well worth it). Open the song in Quicktime Player. Cut it down to whatever you want. Select "Export", and save it as a .mov file with whatever Quicktime audio format you want, or as an AIFF file, which you can then import into iTunes or another program to get it into MP3 format.

    2) iMovie can actually do this. Import the song into iMovie and edit it. Once you're done, export the project as Quicktime with custom settings, and do the same as above. It works just fine, although it's a bit of a hassle.

    I beileve you can edit the starting and ending points of a song in iTunes, as well, but I don't know if you can export the resulting file.
     
  21. Wotan thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #21
    Makosuke

    Hey.. Thanks, finally I run out of questions... :)
     

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