Odd Sayings

Discussion in 'Community' started by bennetsaysargh, May 18, 2003.

  1. macrumors 68020

    bennetsaysargh

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    Jan 20, 2003
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    New York
    #1
    When Americans say break a leg, British people seem to look at us like we're nut-jobs.

    Anyone have anymore examples of something like this?
     
  2. Moderator emeritus

    eyelikeart

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    Jan 2, 2001
    Location:
    Metairie, LA
    #2
    when it's raining while the sun is shining out...it's called "the devil beating his wife"

    my grandmother used to say that all the time when I was little... :)
     
  3. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Portland, Maine
    #3
    Actually, there's a pretty cool explanation to "break a leg." (I know this because I'm an actor.) The legs in a theatre are the long, thin curtains by the side of the stage that hide the area immediately backstage. If you have to make an entrance, the stage manager pulls aside the curtain for you. But if you do really well in a performance, just maybe, the audience will keep clapping so long that you have to give a second curtain call. In those cases, the SM won't pull aside the curtain for you (by this time, they are stressed enough that they are probably already soaking their feet and sucking on ice), so you have to just walk through the curtain - or break the leg.
     
  4. macrumors 603

    Joined:
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    #4
    They call the time period in a day in which many people leave from work into crowded and bogged roadways and highways "rush hour".
     
  5. Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

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    #5
    Proverbs are always contradicting themselves. Just try and follow these gems of advice:

    You can't teach an old dog new tricks. vs. You're never too old to learn.

    Actions speak louder than words. vs. The pen is mightier than the sword.

    Silence is golden. vs. The squeaky wheel gets the grease.

    And my favorite:

    He who hesitates is lost. vs. Look before you leap. Hmmm. Should I follow this advice right away, or should I contemplate it first?
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
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    Europe
    #6
    Re: Odd Sayings

    Well, whatever british person looked at your liek you were a nut-job must have been extremely retarded.

    This saying has been used in this country since shakespearian times.

    And in fact, shakespear, you are right about the acting part, but the meaning of the saying, according to my drama teacher, was far more superstitious. During the times that shakespeares plays were first being performed there was some sort of belief that actors had (actors being very superstitious in general) that there were these little gremlin things or some kind of force that would make things happen opposite to what you people said should happen, sort of a version of sod's law if you like. So actors started wishing each other luck by saying "break a leg" hoping the little gremlin thingy would hear and make the opposite happen, ie, they wouldn't break their legs on stage.

    A strange story but its true.
     
  7. macrumors 603

    Joined:
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    #7
    >Actions speak louder than words. vs. The pen is mightier than the sword. (Doctor Q)

    I feel these two sayings are unrelated to each other. The first one seems to deal with how intense of an emotional standpoint an individual is in, while the second one deals with intelligence and how writing things down on a sheet of paper is smarter than resorting to violence.
     
  8. Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

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    #8
    I don't see an emotion vs. intelligence distinction here. The first proverb is about spoken words while the second is about written words, but I think they are both about the brain vs. brawn, with the former taking the brawn point of view and the latter taking the brain point of view.
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    tazo

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    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, Seattle, WA actually
    #9
    any of those where you go like, he is a few fries short of a biggie frie. :)
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    GeneR

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2003
    Location:
    The land of delusions, CA.
    #10
    Okay, maybe not so strange:

    "His train of thought is still boarding at the station."

    "The elevator doesn't go to the top floor."

    "S/he's dumber than rocks."

    :D
     
  11. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
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    Location:
    London
    #11
    Back home (South Africa) when I was little, I remember hearing, 'die apies trou vandag' (the monkies' are getting married today) whenever this happened. :)
     
  12. thread starter macrumors 68020

    bennetsaysargh

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    New York
    #12
    ooh, i got another one,
    why do we say, it's cold as hell today, and then on another day we can say it's hot as hell?
     
  13. macrumors 65816

    maradong

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2003
    Location:
    Luxembourg
    #13
    take french leave.
    filer à l anglaise

    it goes back to the 30year war. english and french people can t smell each other since. :D at least in funny speaking, i mean joking one over the other. ...
     
  14. macrumors 68000

    pivo6

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2002
    Location:
    Minnesota
    #14
    Instead of saying "Well I'll be a monkey's uncle,a friend of mine from high school would say, "well dip me in sh*t". It's still funny at least to me.
     
  15. macrumors 65816

    kettle

    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    England, Great Britain (Airstrip One)
    #15
    The Problem with this Thread

    - It couldn't stop a pig in a passage.

    Don't look a gift horse in the mouth

    you may find it's getting a little long in the tooth.
    :eek:
     
  16. macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #16
    "Now you're sucking diesel" - Irish expression, meaning, 'now you're doing well'.

    One saying that really bugs me, is "I could care less"; when what it should be is "I COULDN'T care less"; i.e. 'I care so little, I couldn't possibly care any less'. The first doesn't even make sense (...not that sucking diesel does either... :)

    Mike.
     
  17. macrumors 68030

    britboy

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2001
    Location:
    Kent, UK
    #17
    My all-time favourite has to be:

    It's cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey

    Followed by:

    He/She is as thick as two short planks

    :)
     
  18. Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2001
    Location:
    VA
    #18
    I just used one in another post and really have no idea where it came from -

    'tide you over'..... I understand its meaning, but that's it

    D
     
  19. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2003
    Location:
    London
    #19
    Then there is also "taking the piss" (making a joke out of something, playing the fool)
     
  20. Mal
    macrumors 603

    Mal

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    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Orlando
    #20
    That's actually not a contradiction, because the first one is saying that your message is carried better if backed up with your actions, while the second says that more powerful changes can be made through writing than by killing. Not really a contradiction.

    JW
     
  21. macrumors 68040

    tazo

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2003
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest, Seattle, WA actually
    #21
    that is a great line. I myself am guilty of it and I never though of it like. that. lol.
     
  22. Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #22
    "My alarm clock went off, so I turned it off."
     
  23. thread starter macrumors 68020

    bennetsaysargh

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    Jan 20, 2003
    Location:
    New York
    #23
    lol. that's a good one. i say that a lot.
     
  24. macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #24
    odd sayings

    Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle!
    Why do we drive on parkways, and park on driveways?
     
  25. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2002
    Location:
    Sweden, south side
    #25
    swedish clasic

    in Sweden we say: "Det är ingen ko på isen" which translate to "There is no cow on the ice"

    basically: "take it easy, there´s no rush (since there is no cow on the ice)

    nice one?
     

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