Okay, so it's January 20, 2008...

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Thomas Veil, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #1
    ...and lo and behold, a Democrat has been elected president.

    Now what?

    I mean, I was just thinking about what a unique situation this would be. Given the eight previous years of deception, propaganda, corporate looting, hate-mongering, conspiracy, stonewalling, war-making and empire building, what do you think the President of the United States should do...just shrug and say, "Okay, it's back to business as usual"? Just go back to the way things were in the Clinton administration?

    I don't know about you, but that's not nearly good enough for me. I think the next Democratic president has a helluva job on his hands. I think he's got to try to ensure that nothing like this administration ever happens again.

    So again I ask: what do you do?

    I have a few thoughts of my own:

    1. Immediately order the FCC to reinstate the Fairness Doctrine within three months, and press Congress to make it law, not just policy.
    2. Order the proper government authorities (SEC?) to draw up plans for reinforcing and implementing anti-trust laws, with the intention of breaking up the biggest corporations, including media corporations, into more competitive parts.
    3. Order the Justice Department to begin an investigation into (a) the relationship between the bin Laden family and the Bush family, and how it might have affected government policy following September 11, and (b) conspiracy between the previous administration and corporations to influence elections.
    4. Order a similar investigation into Halliburton's role in the Middle East.
    5. Challenge Congress to strengthen RICO laws to include the influencing of elections and policy through blatant deception (a la the Swift Boat Veterans for "Truth").
    6. Create a NATO-like U.N. force specifically designed for keeping peace in the Middle East, and committing the United States to sending that force in if needed, rather than going in on our own.

    Now, I'm making some of this up off the top of my head, and there may be practical reasons why some of these would never work, but we're just speaking hypothetically here. Feel free to challenge some of my ideas or add thoughts of your own.

    But like I said...January 20, 2008 cannot be just "business as usual". This country needs major changes.
     
  2. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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  3. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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  4. Sayhey macrumors 68000

    Sayhey

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    #4
    Right now, unless the Democrats do an awful lot of work, the favorite for election in 2008 has to be a Republican, John McCain. Not that I know he is running or that he can get passed a GOP primary full of activists who hate him, but if the election was held today with McCain as the Republican candidate against any probable Democratic candidate I'd bet on McCain. He won't get my vote, of course, but before we go counting on a Democratic resurgence in 2008 let's see what can be done in the next four years.

    I'd be more interested in how we change the make up of Congress in 2006 and what agenda is possible in the two years following that.

    However, in an effort to not skirt the issue you raise, the short answer to the question you ask, Thomas, of "what now" is whoever is the President-elect in 2008 will be limited in what he or she can do by a legacy of deficit and war, it will be impossible to just go back to the policies of Clinton.

    I don't have any real problems with your suggestions (though I think some of them - especially #6 are highly unlikely,) but the number one question facing the new President will be how do we remove our troops from Iraq and Afghanistan and eliminate the huge drain on our treasury and prestige.
     
  5. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #5

    1. Not just following Sept 11...
      And Bechtel.
      And get rid of gerrymandering.
    Hmmm.
     
  6. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #6
    I'm a little confused about how there would be a new president on January 20th, 2008. Will Bush voluntarily reduce his second term to three years? :)

    As for who is the favorite in 2008, it's way too far away to tell. I don't really believe McCain will be likely candidate by then.

    I hope that a Democrat is elected in 2008, but I fear that whoever is elected will be seriously constrained by what this administration has done. I imagine that by then the US will have invaded Saudi Arabia or Iran, depending on US strategy for energy. If we decide to give up on Central Asia and the Caspian, we'll invade Saudi Arabia to install a new, theoretically more reliable in the long-term, regime there. If we feel that we can continue to deal with the Saudis for a while, and feel that securing the southern route from the Caspian will allow us to secure US interests in Central Asia and the Caspian, then we'll invade Iran (it's really the only way: the Caucasus are unstable and not a strong enough base to ensure control, Russia's to the north, China's to the East).

    On the domestic front, if Bush can pass further "reforms", any future president will be further tied down by massive military spending and the weakened state of the US economy. They can spend four years trying to undo everything Bush has done, but where will that really get us?
     
  7. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

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    #7
    Everything also depends on the congress. Would a Democratic president ge tthe same lock-step support from the congress, even if both houses flipped? Remember, the Democrats haven't shown themselves to be able to effectively attack the current administration without shooting themselves in the foot. How are they going to stand up to an organized and ruthless Republican opposition?

    But, as to my wishlist (and off the top of my head)...

    Raise taxes to Clinton levels - the guilded age redux is getting old.

    Cut the military - I fail to see how spending four hundred billion dollars ($400,000,000,000) has made us more secure. In fact, we've spent more, and become more insecure and more fearful, and had more rights taken away than ever before. Let's move some of that spending towards education and healthcare. Having a well-educated, healthy country will get us farther in life than having the biggest cocks. If you want, spend it on port security and renewable energy, which might actually accomplish something.

    Work with the international community. If we haven't figured out by now that we can't go it alone, we're doomed, and we're taking everyone else down with us. We like to put our "rugged individualism" and "to hell with 'em" attitude on an altar and worship it. This isn't gonna cut it anymore. The world is too small to act like that. I can't believe that such a large portion of the US believes that the rest of the world is irrelevent. It's like having a roomate who smokes inside, leaves trash all over the house, starts fights, and doesn't pay his rent. Would *you* put up with that?
     
  8. Thomas Veil thread starter macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #8
    All I can say is, I am to Math what George Bush is to public speaking. :eek:
     
  9. Xtremehkr macrumors 68000

    Xtremehkr

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    #9
    And a complete overhaul of the electronic voting system, including a complete investigation.

    After that, solid legislation protecting against voter purging methods that have been used and measure to prevent any other kind of voter purging as seen in places like Broward County.

    So many things need to be investigated concerning this Administration, cleaning up the media would be a big help though.
     
  10. Thomas Veil thread starter macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #10
    I think a lot depends on:

    implementing as much as possible by executive order;

    using the power of the "honeymoon period", the media, and the bully pulpit as much as possible within the first 100 days. If it were me, I'd get on TV for a national address and plead with all Americans to help me clean up the corruption in Washington...to write, call and e-mail their senators and representatives into submission. Whether that'd work or not is up in the air. But I'd try like hell to make it work, with the support of the people.
     
  11. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #11
    I have a feeling that the next President is going to be supremely inneffectual, especially if they happen to be a Democrat.

    I base this on the legacy of deficits and the gutting of social-services and the erosion of the traditional economic centers. This latter instance is not really the fault of the Bush administration, as it is a long-term process, but little has been done to rectify this situation - the US educational system is in shambles, and the lack of concentration on worker-related issues (as opposed to business owners) will certainly hurt in the times to come.

    If a Democrat is elected, the pundits will have a field day blaming the poor state-of-affairs on this poor sap, shifting the blame from the mistakes of the past Adminstration. Even good plans will face funding and resource problems, while an increasingly desperate populace clamors for a painless fix.

    So, my hopes for 2008 are this:

    Elect a woman or a minority to President. Join the rest of the advanced Nations in this regard, and settle for a symbolic victory in leiu of a practical one. I would love a gay President too, but I am not sure the country is ready for that one, although I'd love a future President to surprise everyone by coming out of the Oval closet, as it were...
     
  12. aloofman macrumors 68020

    aloofman

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    #12
    Fantasy can be fun. I have zero faith in the Democratic Party to be any more virtuous than the GOP because they've been bought and sold too. If Kerry were the president right now, would he have any solution to the Iraq fiasco? The massive deficits? Improving the U.S. standing in the world? Exploding health care costs? He proposed no real answers to any of these during the campaign, so it seems unlikely that he'd have any epiphanies.

    While I'm sure that some of the Bushies' incompetence could be reversed through executive order and appointment, these big problems are not being addressed by either party. None of the solutions are easy, so they don't want a part of it. I fear that it's going to take a major popular backlash -- or possibly a major crisis -- to break this trend.
     
  13. DakotaGuy macrumors 68040

    DakotaGuy

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    #13
    Okay, so it's January 20th 2008 and Jeb Bush is being sworn in as the next President...wait a second...oh yeah that was just a nightmare I had the other night.
     
  14. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

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    #14
    You remember January 20, 1993? There had been 12 years of Republican White Houses, 20 years if we overlook Jimmy Carter's brief stint in the job...

    Somehow, the Dems pulled themselves up, stood strong, and went on not to business as usual, but business unusual, bringing about important improvements for everyday Americans.
     
  15. aloofman macrumors 68020

    aloofman

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    #15
    And many Republicans went into a period of mourning on the same day. It's interesting how people fool themselves into thinking one party really cares about them more than the other party does. It's delusional, really.
     
  16. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

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    #16
    Eh, perhaps, but the two parties choose very different roads, policy-wise, to electoral success. The Democratic Party has, since the days of Roosevelt, found its success more often in helping the marginalized or the struggling. The Republican Party often looks after another, less needy cohort. I favor the former route.
     
  17. Thomas Veil thread starter macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #17
    That could well be. I have a feeling the way a Democratic president could make himself effective would be to adopt a fairly "radical" platform which heavily favors the people over the corporations. In other words, another FDR.

    There are two questions, of course: (1) could he get his programs through Congress (as other people have pointed out)?, and (2) do the Democrats even have the cajones to run somebody like this?
     

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