Old Powerbook G4 - remove lid/display

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by gfroyle, Apr 29, 2009.

  1. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2004
    #1
    Hi, I have an old PowerBook G4 (15" alum) that has a dodgy screen that I want to replace.

    I have another old (non-working) PBG4 and so I want to replace the bad screen with the one from the non-working machine.

    However, all the instructions that I have found online involve complete disassembly of the whole thing in order to take the actual LCD screen out of the display casing or lid.

    Is there a way of just disconnecting the entire "lid+screen" at the hinges and then putting on a new "lid+screen"?

    Thanks

    Gordon
     
  2. macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    ~119W 34N
    #2
    It looks like the disassembly is quite different between models. Some require removal of the logic board, others don't.

    I've done a couple of titanium PBs, and they also required complete disassembly. Judging by that experience, I doubt there's an easy way around it. In other words. every step was necessary.

    If you do need to remove the logic board, you'll need some heatsink compound, for reassembly. "Arctic Silver" seems to be the recommended brand.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2004
    #3
    It's a 15" 1.25GHz aluminium model...

    One guide that I found was

    http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Repair/PowerBook-G4-Aluminum-15-Inch-1-1-5-GHz-Display/229/1

    It is very comprehensive, but it doesn't say whether you NEED to open, say, the memory compartment (Step 3) in order to get to the display - its not obvious to me why this is needed...

    On the other hand, presumably someone has done this before and maybe it IS all needed and I should just get on with it..

    Cheers

    Gordon
     
  4. macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2006
    Location:
    ~119W 34N
    #4
    You need to open the memory compartment to get to the two screws - they're part of removing the top case, I believe.
     

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