Open your Christmas presents early - go straight to jail!

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by BoyBach, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #1
    - BBC

    To quote Rufus Wainwright: "Oh, what a world we live in."
     
  2. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

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    #2
    Wow. :eek: Having your son arrested for opening a Christmas present.:rolleyes: :D



    ***makes note to self to never open any Christmas presents early*** ;) :D
     
  3. Dalriada macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Poor kid to have parents like that...... :mad: They should have taken the gift back to the local store full stop. Buying a video game console for a hyperactive kid... just great :rolleyes: would have been better to buy him a football.
     
  4. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

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    #4

    I thought the same thing, a video game console is probably not the best Christmas gift for that kid. :rolleyes:
     
  5. wordmunger macrumors 603

    wordmunger

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    #5
    Actually, a wii might not be a bad idea for a kid like that -- with the new controllers, it can really give you a workout. That said, clearly there are some other issues in the family that need to be addressed.
     
  6. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #6
    So the mother though that the police would scare the ADH out of him and he'd behave?:rolleyes:


    Some great parenting skills there!!!
     
  7. dmw007 macrumors G4

    dmw007

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    #7

    I think chaining him to a treadmill might be a better idea. ;) :D :cool:
     
  8. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    Feb 14, 2004
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    Reality
    #8
    No kidding!

    What I want to know is...instead of arresting this kid to "teach him a lesson", why don't they have him on medication for ADHD? (There's no mention that he is.) I know a kid who's got it (though apparently not as bad), and the kid really annoys the **** out of everybody.
     
  9. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

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    #9
    OF COURSE he has ADHD.

    OF FRIGGEN COURSE!


    /sigh
     
  10. Maxiseller macrumors 6502a

    Maxiseller

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    #10
    The problem is that there is always a diagnosis for things now. Naughty = Attention Deficit etc etc.

    I'm not sure I condone the waste of police time but I've dealt with attention deficit and I know how problematic it can be. The mother was probably at the end of her tether. What nobody understands or appreciates is that it isn't Attention Deficit that causes these problems, it's those very early childhood years that the kid was possibly neglected/allowed to do everything or the family broke up. And that IS the mothers fault.

    Diagnosis in this case, is not the cure.
     
  11. Sdashiki macrumors 68040

    Sdashiki

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    #11
    /signed

    parenting = pills
     
  12. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    Canada, eh?
    #12
    These are the sorts of kids that I really enjoy working with.

    I volunteer at a summer camp for kids aged 8-15, something I've been doing since I was 15 myself, which makes it.... 13 years now. Wow.

    Looking back, I have found that the kids I have most enjoyed working with were the ones who were super-energetic, typically "hyperactive". I have worked with THREE different sets of ADD/hyperactive identical twins. And loved it!

    The other staff think I'm nuts. These kids certainly drive a lot of people to the end of their rope. I suspect it was because I was diagnosed as ADHD hyperactive, when I was a kid, so I totally relate with these kids.

    Typically this diagnosis means nothing more than "has a hard time sitting still and conforming in structured social settings". Often these kids are also denoted as gifted. So why should it come to anyone's surprise that when you have a bright, energetic child, he acts out when you tell him to sit down and shut up? Rather than provide a nurturing and challenging environment (at home AND at school) the easy solution is to shove a pill down the kid's throat and hope he conforms better.

    I have also been heartbroken so many times at the kinds of environments these kids are growing up in. Single parent homes where the mother or father is constantly exasperated and angry. Constant harsh parenting, even verbal or emotional abuse. Stories like the above, though generally not to that extreme, are the norm.

    Then these kids show up at an environment such as a summer camp and we provide them an opportunity to run around and to play. We provide learning experiences. I approach these kids with no preconceived notions, talk to them like they are real people, LISTEN to them like they are real people, provide rational discussion and logical explanations instead of "Because I said so, that's why!", and give them the attention that they want, that nobody else in their lives are giving them.

    And then people say I'm good with kids. :rolleyes:

    (oops, didn't mean to get on a soapbox.. :eek: )
     
  13. Maxiseller macrumors 6502a

    Maxiseller

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    #13
    I agree with you to an extent, but the reality of the life that we have created for ourselves is that it's not feasible to let kids run around and be free all the time.

    If we lived in the wild, living from cave to cave, and instead of worrying about the stock markets spent our time thinking "Jeez, that lion's getting close" then great - these kids would be fine. That isn't the case - and sadly isn't likely to become the case.

    As you say, it's harsh when you're built to do something but are confined by the sociological rules placed upon you which after all are built to keep us all under control. But there is nothing we can do about it. We all have to conform to a modest standard. Even those who don't conform still do so because of these diagnoses and "treatments" for their "Condition".

    Sometimes I wish i could live in a shack in the middle of nowhere governing my own life. I'd have to have a mac and broadband too of course!
     
  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #14
    Agreed. There's nothing wrong with ADHD. It's just a label for a certain type of person who was "built differently" and can't behave in a way that our society has deemed "proper." Put me in an open field with everyone else, take away the rules, and I'm just as capable as anyone else, maybe even moreso because I think so many different thoughts at once. It's like brain multitasking. Add our society's rules in, and I'm at a disadvantage because I can't think "linearly" and follow steps and instructions.

    So there's really no such thing as ADHD. There's only such a thing because people who think like me can't survive in a "linear" thinking world, and so we're different only in this world we've created. If ADHD people built this world, you'd be the ones labelled with a disorder.

    I know that this is what a lot of people think, but since I still have ADHD as an adult, I don't really see why people get all worked up over these pills when they actually work for those who need it. I need it, and I wish I was diagnosed with it sooner because meds would have helped my parents A LOT when I was young. I don't like taking pills and probably would have resisted, but I can't imagine being a parent and raising a kid like me, and I don't think I acted out as often as other kids.


    Do you have it now? If you actually did have it as a kid, you should still have it, or at least the ADD part. Most of the "hyperactivity" fades as you get older. Mine did by around age 24, I think. I'm 26 now.
     
  15. mac-er macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2003
    #15

    Apparently, this kid is actually a pretty big trouble maker. He has shoplifted, stolen money from his mom, been arrested for disorderly conduct, punched a police officer, and is facing expulsion from school (that is forever).

    http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/news/local/16165869.htm

    So, this is an incident beyond having him arrested for having ADHD. I'm sure the mother and grandmother are beyond their last straw, and they are trying anything to save him at this point.

    This kid will have robbed a store by 15 and killed someone by 20.
     
  16. benthewraith macrumors 68040

    benthewraith

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    #16
    Which is the part in this story that doesn't make since. Why isn't this kid in Juvenile Hall?
     
  17. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

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    #17
    Why is the mom buying this kid a Wii if he is such a trouble maker?

    That's like rewarding all of this bad behavior.

    Am I the only one confused by this???
     
  18. SkyBell macrumors 604

    SkyBell

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    #18
    Who said it was a Wii? could have been a Gamecube or a DS.
     
  19. eyemacg5 macrumors 6502

    eyemacg5

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    #19
    I really wish my parents were this loving,

    But seriously, what is the world coming to.


    If he is 12 and his Great Grandmother is 63.

    that makes the average age of having a child 17 right? isn't that a bit young to have a child.

    so his mother had him when she was 17, her mother had her when she was 17 and her mother had her when she was 17.

    So maybe he just comes from a rough family?
     
  20. Xeem macrumors 6502a

    Xeem

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    Minnesota
    #20
    I had a neighbor that had her first baby at 13, and it really did cause some problems (as one might expect), but then again there were no grandparents around to help her raise him (her older brother was the family's legal guardian). Still, I think the mother did the right thing by having her kid arrested; he has gotten in a lot trouble and hopefully this will help scare him straight.
     
  21. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #21
    Well... not really. Serious conduct violations (as it sounds like this kid has at school) are not ADHD symptoms. But kids with ADHD do have elevated levels of Conduct Disorder diagnosis / criteria.
     
  22. benthewraith macrumors 68040

    benthewraith

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    #22
    It was a DS. :)
     
  23. floriflee macrumors 68030

    floriflee

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    Dec 21, 2004
    #23
    Ha! We just opened a couple of Christmas presents from the parents last night. Good thing they live several thousand miles away, I guess.

    Ssh! Don't tell them! :D
     
  24. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #24
    *calls 911* :D
     
  25. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

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    Denver
    #25
    Yeah, I'm not pissed the kid got arrested. Stealing your Christmas present from your great-grandmother and opening it early is worth it. Little punk.

    Maybe not the best solution and in the long run it won't actually solve anything but at least it got his attention. I don't know how they're gonna set him straight. A person who has such strong issues is pretty screwed. He needed to be set straight long before now...
     

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