Ovaries replenish eggs, study suggests

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Mar 11, 2004.

  1. macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #1
    In a finding that could someday revolutionize fertility treatments, researchers yesterday reported evidence that appears to topple a decades-old tenet of reproductive biology: that girls are born with all the eggs they'll ever have, a pool that dwindles and degenerates with age.

    Rather, the Massachusetts General Hospital researchers say in the journal Nature, experiments show that -- in mice, at least -- females keep producing eggs through their lives, much as males continue producing sperm.

    If the findings are confirmed and hold true for humans, they could eventually lead to previously undreamed-of methods to prolong women's fertility and postpone menopause, said Dr. Jonathan L. Tilly, the paper's senior author.

    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/03/11/ovaries_replenish_eggs_study_suggests/
     
  2. macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
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    Chi Town
    #2
    That's really interesting...I look forward to seeing some whether future studies corroborate this.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    MOFS

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2003
    Location:
    Durham, UK
    #3
    This is really interesting, but it raises a few ethical questtions...

    1) Does a woman have an automatic right to have children?

    NB: This is purely on biological means - I mean, I'm not saying that so called "unfit women to have children" should be not allowed children. More like, if a woman can't anatomically/physiologically have children without medical fertility intervention, should she automatically have the right to fertility treatment?

    PS(!): BTW, the same goes for a man's right to father a child for the reasons mentioned above...just in case anyone thinks I'm being sexist!

    2) No doubt this treatment would be very expensive (considering its forcing the body to do something it can't do in such an extreme way). Is it right that we should spend so much money on what would be a very expensive and risky procedure and course when (a) we already have pretty effective treatment already (HRT and in vitro fertilisation spring readily to mind) and (b) we could improve the lives of people with chronic and life-shortening syndromes such as diabetes mellitus?

    Just my 2p!
     
  4. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #4
    Interestingly, the recent Korean human clones were made by taking these follicle cells that surround the ovary. It only worked with these cells, and only if the cell and nucleus came from the same person. Makes me wonder if the cloning relied on the special nature of these cells.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #5
    I found this to be a very interesting study. If this proves to be true in humans, then it will overturn long held beliefs.
     
  6. macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #6
    Or would it be right to bring yet another person into a world where not everyone can be fed? How far will people go before they decide to adopt?
     
  7. macrumors 65816

    tpjunkie

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    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #7
    this study, if proven true would totally overthrow a long held biological dogma of mammalian development...This is stuff we were taught since freshman biology in high school, so its a pretty huge finding
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    rueyeet

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2003
    Location:
    MD
    #8
    Yeesh! you mean I'm not halfway rid of them all? Rats! ;) :p

    Talk about unfit to reproduce: I've considered donating my eggs, since I don't plan to use them, but my genes are saddled with: early-onset arthritis, bad eyesight, a whole host of allergies, and predispositions to hypoglycemia, thyroid trouble, and alchoholism. And that's not even going into the poor coordination and social skills (yep, a classic nerd here).

    I would cringe to pass my DNA on to the next generation. Absolutely cringe.
     
  9. thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #9
    I applaud your decision not to donate your eggs, when you realized what would be passed on to the next generation. I certainly hope that you are not afflicted by the above listed illnesses.
     
  10. macrumors 68000

    hvfsl

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    Jul 9, 2001
    Location:
    London, UK
    #10
    I always believed women kept on producing eggs through life, I only heard of the theory where women dont produce anymore eggs after they are born, here. I guess I did not pay much attention in Science class.
     
  11. thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #11
    If this is proven to be true, it will throw a long held believed fact out the window. This was taught as fact in all of the courses if took.
     

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