Partitioning w/i Mac OS

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by gsatch, Feb 19, 2008.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    #1
    Hey Everyone,

    I'm coming from a Windows background ... 1st Mac. My question: within Windows I would partition a separate OS drive and a separate data drive to allow for reloading the OS without affecting data. Would it make sense to do something similar in the Mac OS world?

    Thanks in advance for any help,
    Satch
     
  2. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2007
    Location:
    Leeds, UK
    #2
    I don't think so. I used to do the same as you when I was a Windows user.

    On a Mac it is possible to create 2 partitions (or more if you feel it's necessary) and mount one partition on / (root) and the other on /Users to achieve a something similar to what you were doing on Windows.

    I think there were mainly 2 arguments for partitioning in Windows.

    1. Have Windows installed on C:, and Documents stored elsewhere D:. Doing this would make re-installs a lot easier. I'd be able to wipe C: without the fear of wiping my Documents and Programs.
    2. If 1 partition developed a fault, then the other partition should still be ok. That's the theory. It never happened to me though.

    The first argument doesn't really apply to Mac OS X. The separation between OS files and user files is much better than on Windows. Also, backing up (Time Machine) is much better on a Mac, so you can wipe your HD, re-install Mac OS and use Time Machine to restore all your settings and apps.

    The advantage of having everything on one partition is that you're never faced with the problem of running out of space on one partition whilst having plenty of space on the other.
     
  3. macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #3
    You can do the same with OS X, but it's generally not recommended for anything other than server use. Bearing in mind that an Archive+install allows the re-installation of the OS without affecting data on the same partition anyhow, you should be fine.

    Backups, as always, are a good idea, however ;)
     
  4. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    #4
    Thanks Stomer, I appreciate the reply, esp. given the commonalities of our background. I've pretty much backed down to creating a Mac partition (on drive 1) and then a Time Machine partition (on drive 2); your reply gives me some comfort that I'm heading down the right path.

    Satch
     
  5. macrumors 603

    richard.mac

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Location:
    51.50024, -0.12662
    #5
    im using the same setup but im thinking of switching back to one partition as i dont find any speed improvements. i moved the whole users folder to another partition and i always get the same error in repair permissions.
     
  6. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    #6
    Thanks also tersono - gives me a better "feel" for an OS reload (as ya know with Windows, it's a twice-a-year deal, at least ;)). VERY GLAD to be on a Mac!!
     
  7. macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #7
    LOL - you're welcome. For what it's worth I never re-install between major OS X releases - last time was when Leopard came out and the time before that was well over 2 years previously when Tiger appeared. The beauty of OS X is that there's no central registry to get hosed - like all *nix operating systems, prefs are all held in individual preference files, which can simply be deleted if they get corrupted, the system then making a new one automatically. Saves a lot of time and effort =]
     
  8. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    #8
    Am I right in thinking that there are some advantages to having data and apps on different physical drives - increased speed etc, especially if doing video work etc?

    Many thanks

    Miles
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    killmoms

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #9
    There can be a speed advantage, but usually at the point where you're limited by hard drive transfer rate you're probably entering the realm of data-specific RAID drives anyway.
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2007
    Location:
    Leeds, UK
    #10
    I would think there'd be some increase in speed, but I doubt that it would be noticeable.
     

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