Paying Tribute to Hospice Pioneer Kubler-Ross

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #1
    Aug. 25, 2004

    Psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, who revolutionized the way the world looks at terminally ill patients, has died at age 78. Her book On Death and Dying launched her career as a pioneer for hospice care. John Biewen of American Radioworks reports.

    She will be most remembered for her book on the 5 stages of death. The mother of modern hospice care.

    http://www.npr.org/features/feature.php?wfId=3871190
     
  2. rainman::|:| macrumors 603

    rainman::|:|

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    #2
    this woman is one of the true great leaders in modern medicine. she faced tremendous opposition in her work (including arson attacks on her child-AIDS center and research clinic), but she pushed on for her cause to establish deathcare.

    to put it another way, if it weren't for this woman, when my great-grandmother died earlier this year, she would have been lying in a tub somewhere staring at the dark. Instead thanks to hospice she was comfortable and pain-free, in a well-attended-to private hospital suite.

    "here's to the crazy ones"
    paul
     
  3. mlw1235 macrumors 6502

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    #3
    It is a sad day for hospice.
    My mom worked at one for about 5 years in bereavement, and the services they offer are second to none.

    Hospice is truly a great organization that more people should look into for their dying family and friends.
     
  4. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    My wife worked for Hospice for a couple of years. Took a class to continue her certification. My father-in-law that is a retired physician use hospice for his wife and was very impressed. Think that he made a donation. Being a visiting nurse my wife assesses her patients and encourages hospice care when appropriate. Medicare has a great program for seniors.
     
  5. jhu macrumors 6502a

    jhu

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  6. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

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    #6
    May St. Peter invite her to the "special" supper reserved mostly for the Saints entering Heaven. For what ever reason I had a coworker die, that should have been in a Hospice.

    I pray that God take me quickly, or give me the opportunity to go to a Hospice.

    Though i can understand the "economic" pressure's. My Aunt was placed in a "nursing home"; more for money than anything else. She was expected to live only 6 to 9 months. She hung in there for almost a year and half till her estranged daughter came for a visit.

    A few months before I visited my Aunt. Of all my relatives it was hardest visit. She was in a nursing home. Just a "number". in my mind.

    We both cried. Because the woman that was so responsible for what I am today, was feeling so much that she could not control. And for I wished so much for her to be able to be with the family and surroundings that meant so much for her.

    She was my "Auntie Mame". It was so hard to see someone that wanted me to part in the "banquet of life", suffer so. She was the one to teach me, "birdie, birdie, in the sky; why did you do that in my eye?". Or the woman that taught me about death, through the death of her pets. Or much to my Mom's displeasure to use the word "croak", to mean death. My Mom wanted me to "elevated" in the "status" of "life". To my Aunt, life had a beginning and end.

    And for me it was so hard to see her not living "life". It turned out that a daughter that she was estranged from - came for a visit after X number of years. That afternoon, my Aunt allowed herself to meet St. Peter.

    God Bless you Aunt Helen. Your lessons of "life" were not lost. Your lessons of listening to my parents was not lost. And that there is good in each one of of us. May God bless you for all you gave me.

    {Sorry to others here. This hit a nerve. I spoke these these words to her when she was the person I knew. In many ways this is eulogy that I would have loved to give her. But with the churches that we grew up under, only the clergy are able to give the eulogy).

    "Life's a banquet...."
     
  7. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #7
    I think that was a very nice tribute to your aunt. You were lucky to have someone so special like that in your life. That is very sad that you weren't able to give a eulogy. Now in some special way you have.

    The main purpose fro Hospice is to keep the person comfortable. If they no longer want medications or to eat, that is OK. They are given pain relief. I wasn't sure by your post, did your aunt have Hospice?
     
  8. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #8
    Wow.

    Hospice is wonderful. My father-in-law died last year, of diabetes. He had been getting weaker and sicker for years, but his last few weeks were made immeasurably better by the wonderful nurses of the local hospice program.

    RIP, Ms. Kubler-Ross, and a great big "thank you" from one appreciative family.
     
  9. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

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    #9
    Thank you.

    The family wanted a hospice, but could not afford it. The nursing home she was at barely took care of her, and to me took her dignity away. The hospices I have seen really allows one have dignity in ones last months of life.
     
  10. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    #10
    I'm very sorry to hear that. Did you actually contact a Hospice Care Agency in your area? If not you should for future reference. It's my wife's understanding that under Medicare, once you are accepted, all your care is taken care of from then on. My Mother was in a nursing home. They sent in home health aide, she supplemented the care that she received from the staff. Her nurse made sure that she was comfortable. The night that she died, a home health was at her side to make her comfortable. To provide what ever was needed.
     

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