PC user (hopefully "soon" a Mac user)

Discussion in 'Buying Tips, Advice and Discussion (archive)' started by bux, Apr 24, 2004.

  1. bux macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #1
    Hi!
    I'm a PC (GNU/Linux and FreeBSD) user currently and I would really like to switch to Mac.
    I'm thinking of getting a 17" (or 15") Powerbook (because they seams to be so very nice and powerfull)
    So, I have some questions.

    1) How long can I expect a new powerbook to be able to run new software (1, 2, 3 or even more years?)?
    2) The .mac thing, is it a "one time pay" or do I pay like every year (if I choose that I want .mac)
    3) When is the new Mac OS X (tiger?) going to be released?
    Should I wait til' it's going to be preinstalled on the pb or is that going to take a while?
    4) How about free software, is there much free software for OS X?
    5) The soundcard... is it bad, good or great? I see that there is a headphone output in the pb, but if I want to plug my (external) speakers to it? Can I use the headphone output and it will work good?
    6) hmmm... can't figure it out (I'm sure it was something I had in my mind) :)
     
  2. matthew24 macrumors 6502

    matthew24

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #2
    1) OS X was only released on 24 of March 2001, I just can't see any reason why it would not last for many years.
    2) .Mac as a service demands a contrbution every year.
    3) I expect 'Tiger' to be released somewhere early next year.
    - Panther, already is a state of the art OS on its own: no reason to wait.
    4) Software is no problem, amazing much and excellent quality.
    5) Sound leaves nothing to be desired, just look for some good speakers.
     
  3. stoid macrumors 601

    stoid

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Location:
    So long, and thanks for all the fish!
    #3
    1) Depends on what software you mean. It will be able to do web browsing and word processing until computers go out of style. However, it may already be fairly taxed on some of the games out there right now.
    2) Annual fee. The only reason I would get .mac is for it's syncing capabilities of Calendar, Address Book, Mail, etc, etc with your other computers. Since you are looking at a PowerBook, chances are, you plan to take it with you anyway, so I probably wouldn't get it. Besides, all the other services can be had for free. (Except the virus protection, but I'll let you know the minute a Mac OS X machine contracts a virus).
    3) We'll probably get a preview of it at WWDC at the end of June. Release time will be around the end of '04 or early '05 I guess. It will be pre-installed after it's released, so you'll have to wait at least that long.
    4) Check out www.versiontracker.com or www.macupdate.com and you'll see what kinds of free software is available. Depends on what you want to do. Apple's iApps generally take care of all my basic needs. With MS Office.mac I don't really need other software. Otherwise, Apple ships them with X11. I've never used X11, but I think it lets you run ANY Unix app on your Mac, and I've heard that there are a lot of free Unix apps available.
    5) The sound card is GREAT. I have the JBL Creature 2 speakers, and the sound is immaculate through the headphone port!
    6) Let us know, we're here to answer your questions and help you make the transition as smooth as possible. You'll love your Mac, especially with your ties to the whole Linux/FreeBSD
     
  4. bux thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #4
    Thanks for your quick and helpful replies, you have helped me a lot!
    I let you know if I come up with a new question :eek:
     
  5. bux thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #5
    Okay, now I have the number 6 question =)

    Will apple (and others) continue to support the G4 cpu (with software applications) even after the Powerbook G5 is released?
    If not then it seams like a Powerbook G4 is a waste of money.
     
  6. flyfish29 macrumors 68020

    flyfish29

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2003
    Location:
    New HAMpshire
    #6
    They will continue to support past processors...up to a certain point of course. When OSx was introduced it needed to be a G3 or better which of course goes back probably almost 7 or 8 years (?). It was only the really old processors they didn't support whent they moved to the OSX platform. They should not have to make a move like this for many many years to come so you are plenty safe with G4.

    I think you need to clairify #1 for the thread...there are several answers you could get depending on what you mean.

    You could mean...will it run new OS from Apple in the future and for how long.

    You could mean...will it run new app. programs in the future and for how long.

    etc.

    Either way, you should be plenty safe for 4 or more years I would think. I don't know of many software programs that couldn't run on machines that were sold new 4 years ago...(I know some games run better or need very new machines)...but as far as programs go you should be safe. OF course it is technology and no one knows for sure what is in store, but Apple has typically taken good care of being as compatible as possible and the only timie they really had to "screw some people" was when they made the jump to OSx and had to say...those old processors that we supported for so damn long...yeah those...we have to let you go and if you want the best os you have to upgrade.

    I hope I have this right and if not I am sure there are plenty to correct me. :D
     
  7. bux thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #7
    "You could mean...will it run new OS from Apple in the future and for how long.

    You could mean...will it run new app. programs in the future and for how long."

    true, I guess I meant both and wasn't clear in the question.

    But thanks for your reply regarding the cpu question, I was worried about that because of the 64 vs 32 bits I mean it differs quite a lot.
     
  8. blue&whiteman macrumors 65816

    blue&whiteman

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    #8
    do you really think apple is just going to up and drop support for a cpu that is in most of their systems and has already been around since 99?

    this is a mac world, not a pc world. macs have a MUCH longer life span when it comes to how long hardware can run current software.

    when you switch to mac you will be able to leave behind 90% of the hassle that computers can be.
     
  9. bux thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #9
    hehe, guess I've been in the PC world too long then ;)
     
  10. matthew24 macrumors 6502

    matthew24

    Joined:
    May 30, 2002
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #10
    .Mac

    I must say that I do like .Mac a lot. Your addesses, Calender items and Favorites are available on any computer connected to the internet. Plus 100MB of webspace plus iPhoto publishing features are great. And there is more. A great feature, and you do support Apple, which can't be wrong.
     
  11. bux thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Sweden
    #11
    It sounds good indeed, but as a student I'm not sure if I can afford it (sad but true).
    Also I'm not sure if I really need it either, but it does seam to be a great feature.
     

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