Photoshop CS3 Text Anti-Aliasing

Discussion in 'Design and Graphics' started by dpaanlka, Jun 3, 2007.

  1. macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #1
    I have Photoshop CS3 and I noticed that it's text anti-aliasing is awful compared to the standard Mac OS X anti-aliasing. I've tried every anti-alias setting and I can't get it to look as good as TextEdit's version:

    Photoshop CS3:

    Picture 4.png

    TextEdit 1.4:

    Picture 2.png

    What is that all about? Can I fix that?
     
  2. Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #2
    The final file that you're aiming for in Photoshop, is that a GIF? If so, you may get better results by using the smooth setting and ensuring there are enough colours in the final GIF to fully display all the tonal values of the anti-aliasing.
     
  3. thread starter macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #3
    Actually, that was a screenshot from inside Photoshop while working on a Photoshop file!

    :eek:
     
  4. macrumors G3

    iMeowbot

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2003
    #4
    Photoshop won't use the native OS X anti-aliasing because that would break cross-platform compatibility. That is a shame if you prefer the Apple method.

    If you'd like to soften the text up slightly, you can try an outer glow, same color as the text fill, one pixel size, play with the opacity and technique until you're a little happier with the result.

    You have lots more options (including grabbing the pixels from TextEdit or whatever produces results you like) if you're willing to work with raster text in PS.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    snickelfritz

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    Tucson AZ
    #5
    Photoshop display quality is only accurate at 12.5, 25, 50, and 100%.
    "Actual Pixels" is the only truly accurate setting, especially if you're evaluating layer effects.
     
  6. thread starter macrumors 601

    dpaanlka

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    #6
    Yup... viewing at 100% (actual pixels).
     
  7. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    #7
    Its because the Adobe rendering is doing full-pixel anti-aliasing and the OSX rendering is doing sub-pixel anti-aliasing. ( Read up on clear-type and the like and it should go a good way to explaining the difference )

    Considering the context of Photoshop, its probably better that its kept to full-pixel because of the way in which your using the pixels as part of a composited layer image one of top of the other. So the render engine takes the whole pixel colour value from each layer at that position and then generates the final display colour.

    If you were to split that into sub-pixels, it would generate a whole lot more work for the display... roughly 3 times the amount of processing.
     
  8. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2007
    #8
    Actually, I don't think he's using sub-pixel anti aliasing with OS X. If you zoom in on the image rendered with OS X all the pixels are gray scale and not different colors on the edges (which is how sub-pixel hinting works).
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    ezekielrage_99

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2005
    #9
    I have personally found the majority of the new release of Adobe products are pretty god awful. Tweaky, buggy, medicore quality and slow I'm thinking Adobe will have to lift its game.
     
  10. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2009
    #10
    better anti-aliasing in CS3

    Hi everyone, I'm using Photoshop CS3 and recently discovered a MUCH improved way to get nicely anti-aliased text out of photosop for screen use...

    Create your artwork at doube resolution, and once you're done, flatten it and resample it to 50% using the bicubic algo (smooth/standard/sharp at your discression). The result is dramatically better antialiasing... an example is attached...

    The left hand image is using photoshop's "smooth" antialiasing; the right hand image was made using "smooth" and then reduced to 50% using "bicubic (best for smooth gradients)" resampling...

    RESULT? dramatic improvement! better balance of sharpness (compare the body and dot of the "i" in the two images). Much smoother type (see top of "a"). Just miles nicer!

    I think my method gives the OSX anti-aliasing a run for its money...

    :):):)

    Awesome huh?

    Ricey
     

    Attached Files:

  11. macrumors 65816

    design-is

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    London / U.K.

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