Places where Gas is really cheap

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by radhak, Apr 9, 2004.

  1. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2003
    Location:
    NJ, USA
    #1
    http://money.cnn.com/pf/features/lists/global_gasprices/price.html

    looks like US has been are really pampered ;) And note that many of these places are in developing countries, where a USD is worth far more than here. In India, for example, the average person would take home around US $500 per month (counting only those who can afford a car, of course) . Thats like a gallon costing around $20 here!


     
  2. macrumors 6502a

    javabear90

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    Dec 7, 2003
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #2
    sh*t ¢14 a gallon in venezuela!!! geez i should move there
     
  3. macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #3
    i don't disagree with the intention of these articles, but they are a bit misleading. i agree that gas is cheap in the states, no question about that.

    but gas is cheap in the states for many reasons - one of which is that the way this country formed and the city structure are such that cars are much of a necessity of daily life than other countries.

    this doesn't mean people should be taking advantage of cheap gas and drive SUVs all around - that's a waste, i agree.

    but compare the daily needs - many have to drive to do simple groceries. such isn't the case in many other countries of the world. (heck, i'm from japan. i live two hours away from the tokyo airport - but the only time i have to walk is 10 min. to get the bus stop. after that, public transportation all the way. i can't do that in the states.)
     
  4. macrumors 601

    Backtothemac

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2002
    Location:
    San Destin Florida
    #4
    Fourteen cents. Wow, do I feel like I am getting bent over the table by my governmnet or what.
     
  5. macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #5
    EGYPT
    Cairo
    $0.55

    VENEZUELA
    Caracas
    $0.14

    I can remember gasoline being ~$0.50. It all has to so with supply, demand, and greed. If we stopped buying, only went to the least expensive station or at the very least stop all use of the car except work and essential trips; chances are prices would decrease. The use if the pocket book is the only way to cause a change. Now they think we will pay no matter what, due to to go up another $0.05.
     
  6. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2002
    Location:
    Versailles, KY (and that's pronounced Vurr-sales)
    #6
    I remember in 1997 when I had just turned 18. Gas went up to 1.25 per gallon and I could barely afford to drive to work. Last week, gas shot up to $1.80. I went to a small gas station that has a pay at the pump option that is open 24/7, but the store opens at six a.m. They hadn't raised their price yet, and I filled up at $1.59. I thought that was one hell of a deal. It all depends on what you can afford, how much your vehicle uses, and how much you are used to paying. I personally don't consider current prices too high, but I wish it would cause more people to try and cut back. High prices would be worth it if it would add several years to the world's oil supplies, and slow air pollution at the same time. It doesn't seem to be doing that.
     
  7. macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

    Joined:
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    #7
    I'm curious to know what the the price of a gallon of gas is in Saudi Arabia, the worlds leader in gasoline production.
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    Calvinatir

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2003
    Location:
    LA
    #8
    1.59? 1.80?!?!?

    Im in southern California...Malibu to be exact...and yesterdya I paid 2.48 for gas. I have to drive 17 miles each way to work but fortunately i have a pretty reliable car that gets good gas mileage. Acura RSX at 28 mpg...so Im not too angry. But still... $2.48 a gallon is horrible..and thats the cheap gas! :(
     
  9. macrumors 68040

    jxyama

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #9
    dang. i'm feeling better and better about the decision to go with diesel a few years ago.

    45 to 50 mpg. $1.79 per gallon compared to $1.89 for regular...
     
  10. macrumors 68030

    johnnyjibbs

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    London, UK
    #10
    Petrol has always been cheap in the US. Here in Britain, (as pointed out by the article), petrol is around five times as much. It would be much higher if it weren't for the "petrol crisis" of September 2000, when a nationwide public protest was put into action, not allowing petrol to get to the filling stations. The whole country ground to a hault as petrol dried up and there was mass panic and panic buying of bread and milk. It was quite funny, but also very scary as it shows how we rely on petrol far too much. Because of this, petrol prices have effectly been frozen since then, with prices currently rising slightly to around 80p per litre. But our cars here are much leaner and more environmentally friendly. For instance, we get a tax break for having a 1.0 litre engine.
     
  11. macrumors 65816

    Sweetfeld28

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2003
    Location:
    Buckeye Country, O-H
    #11
    sucks to be you...

    a friend of mine has the same car, except his is the type-S. It really sucks for him cause he has to buy premieum. I have a 2.4L Cavalier, and i get 28 city/30 Hwy.

    By the way, its $1.69 here in NW Ohio right now.
     
  12. macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2001
    Location:
    1 Block away from NYC.
    #12
    Thank you New Jersey.

    $1.61 a gallon.


    Now thats cheap for ya! :(


    Arg, its just so stupid.


    Me and my town are contemplating buying an Oil Feild and Refinery just for out town... (NOT EVEN KIDDING, my town is frikken loaded)
     
  13. macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #13
    Are you spearheading the search committee MrMacman? Towns own electric and water. This would truly be a new are! :eek:
     
  14. macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #14
    But just think how much more you'd resent teh guy driving the hummer on all teh gas that you're subsidizing.
     
  15. Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #15
    I remember people complaining when premium was $.29 per gallon. In fact, my parents had a 65 Cadillac Coupe deVille and we had to trade it because we couldn't afford the 8 miles per gallon from its 7+ litre engine. In those days, price wars were not unusual. Promotional "gifts" were standard fare as well.

    I would not mind heavy gasoline taxes to fund alternative fuels and public transportation. Of course, the tax money would probably be mis-managed but if we could get out from under the thumb of the oil companies, almost anything would be worth it.

    In most areas of Orlando this weekend, I've seen prices from $1.71 to $1.79 but obviously these prices aren't in tourist areas. Those are most likely over $2.00.
     
  16. macrumors G3

    Counterfit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    sitting on your shoulder
    #16
    Heh, what does that have for torque, 50 ft.-lbs? :p

    Anyways, I filled my grandmother's 2k1 Buick Century up with regular for 1.69 9/10 yesterday at a Hess in Pawtucket RI. Then closer to home, I see regular at a Mobil for 1.82. :confused:
     
  17. macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #17
    I don't remember $0.29 per gallon. Do remember price wars and gifts. It was mostly glassware and plates.

    Would you like to see a $0.50 per gallon tax added on to the present tax levied? I agree that the tax would be mismanaged.
     
  18. macrumors 6502

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  19. Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
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    Gone but not forgotten.
    #19
    That was $0.29 per gallon for premium. It seems that regular, which almost no one used was $0.25-$0.26 per gallon.

    Like to see taxes added? Of course not. However, if it's precisely targeted toward alternative fuels and public transportation, I'd be comfortable with it. They can't keep widening roads because it can't meet demand. Besides, if people relied on public transportation, they could have much more disposable income. It's not just gasoline, but maintenance and insurance too. If people had the extra money, they could save the money to buy a house.
     
  20. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    #20
    US gasoline prices should be taxed to match European levels.

    The real problem is that using cars produces huge externalities, that are then paid for by everyone, whether or not they drive. If prices were raised to cover the cost of the externalities (including air pollution, pedestrian deaths, highway construction costs, etc), we would have a much more equitable society, and future infrastructure investments could be decided by a much more informed and rational process. (Knowing the true cost/benefit tradeoffs between building highways or subways, for example.) It makes sense that people who use a service should be the ones to pay for it -- why have cars for so long been immune to this logic?

    The car-dependent sprawl of the United States is, for the most part, less than 50 years old. It could be dismantled and new, better infrastructure built in a comparable (or even shorter) timeframe. Considering the danger of widespread failure of our economy and society if oil supplies run out before we're ready, a rational person would certainly advocate and work to eliminate our dependence on a single machine and fuel for almost every necessary act of daily survival. The suburbs are a dead-end, a red herring, and a waste of resources that could be put to many better uses. Hopefully this will become common knowledge before it is too late.
     
  21. macrumors 6502a

    Sparky's

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    #21
    I guess nobody wants to remember the early '70s "gas crunch", the endless lines, the odd - even buying days, and finally realizing it was just bunch of political maneuvering. I know eventually there is going to be "No gas" (like when the oil fields dry up) but i can't see it happening in my life or my grandchild's lifetime. So if we could see around the political crap and get down to the business of acquiring what we need prices would come down, but as this saying is so often used "Money Talks" and those who have it are controlling those of us who don't by keeping prices high and they just keep getting richer and richer. In my opinion it's just old fashion greed.

    And here are a few related articles that reflect on what was said 30 years ago...
    http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2003/12/19/business/news/12_18_0320_20_36.txt
    http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment-brnovich082603.asp
    God forbid we don't get out Fritos
    http://www.fritolay.com/company/timeline/1970.html
    http://wwwistp.murdoch.edu.au/teaching/N212/n212content/topics/topic5/05surplustoshortage.html
    http://cr.middlebury.edu/es/altenergylife/70's.htm
     
  22. macrumors P6

    wdlove

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    #22
    If Kerry were to follow through it would be especially difficult for my wife. The majority of her driving almost 60% is business. She uses her car to visit patients in their homes.
     
  23. Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #23
    I haven't seen anything from Kerry which says there will be a fuel tax. I'm not saying that he hasn't initiated legislation but all I've seen is from a fearful President/Vice President who don't understand the issues of the majority of the people anyway.

    Home healthcare, what your wife apparently does, is difficult already and would be more difficult if she had to do it using public transportation. However, wouldn't she appreciate it if the streets were less crowded due to better public transporation or there was cleaner, more economical fuel? I hate taxes but, for the right reasons, I would support them.
     

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