Play Xbox 360 on HD Cinema Display? YES... yes you can

Discussion in 'Games' started by Phat_Pat, Jan 10, 2006.

  1. Phat_Pat macrumors 68000

    Phat_Pat

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    #1
    [​IMG]

    was a booth at macworld... in the corner to the far back left


    Link

    30" is not supported yet... but is "around the corner

    currently costs $299.99 until the end of macworld where it'll jump back up in price.
     
  2. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #2
    It's stupid that the ACDs are so limited in their connectivity options that you have to shell out $300 more to hook up a video game console or hi-def video source.
     
  3. Phat_Pat thread starter macrumors 68000

    Phat_Pat

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    #3
    tell me about it... thats why i love my HD tv.. mmmmm
     
  4. 2nyRiggz macrumors 603

    2nyRiggz

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    #4
    thats nice but $300 more..hell no!...HDTV it is


    Bless
     
  5. cwright macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    XBOX 360 monitor options...

    1. Apple 23" ACD ($1,299) + $300 adapter = $1,599

    2. Dell 24" LCD w/ standard component input = $800

    :rolleyes:
     
  6. me hate windows macrumors 6502

    me hate windows

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    #6
    twice as much and nothing gained over the dell
     
  7. snkTab macrumors 6502a

    snkTab

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    #7
    Couldn't you also use the xbox's VGA and then use a VGA-DVI interface. Granted the VGA lets you get these resolutions. 640×480, 848×480, 1024×768, 1280×720, 1280×768, 1280×1024, and 1360×768.

    I still don't know why the 360 is only 1080i. I mean... the original xbox could do 1080i.
     
  8. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #8
    Aren't ACDs DVI-D (DVI-Digital) only? If so, then you'd end up spending $300-$400 (like this device costs) to convert the analog VGA signal to a digital DVI-D signal. If the ACD accepted a DVI-I (DVI-Integrated, with both Digital and Analog signals) connection, then you could use a simple $10 adapter as you described.
     
  9. cvalda macrumors member

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    #9
    Because currently there exist only four (technically five) high definition modes: 480p, 720p, 1080i and 1080p (the "technically" comes from 540p, which is basically 1080i). Right now, there are only a handful of TVs that support 1080p, and they are INCREDIBLY expensive. 1080p won't even be widely used for at least two years, and by then I'm sure Microsoft will have some sort of fix for it.
     
  10. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #10
    I have one of those TVs that can handle 1080p (had it for 5 years now, actually). At that resolution, the difference between 1080i and 1080p is almost undetectable unless you are a SERIOUS videophile. The difference between "i" and "p" is almost not worth the 2x data rate that's required.

    Not supporting 1080p may sound like a big deal, but it really isn't.
     
  11. cartoonfox macrumors regular

    cartoonfox

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    #11
    wait! does this mean i could play my gamecube (composite) on an apple cinema display?!!

    but $300? yikes thats exspensive.

    i think im gonna get a samsung 23" (has composite and scart), but if this box thing goes down in price enough, i might get a cinema display, 'cos i love 'em so much!


    peace : ]
     
  12. DISCOMUNICATION macrumors 6502a

    DISCOMUNICATION

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    #12
    Now it is possible... but why would you

    Question:
    Answer:
    Scroll down to where the first picture is on this page and start reading.

    A lot more computer monitors are going to have HDCP DVI ports starting this year, but they are still all 15:10 aspect ratios instead of 16:9. So you either still have letterboxing or your image is going to look a little squished. I personally perfer letterboxing in most situations, because a lot of my favorite movies were shot in a much wider aspect ratio than a stubby 16:9. I hate the fact that some DVD transfers crop the picture down to 16:9. The credits don't even fit on the screen. Sorry for the off topic rant.
     
  13. d_saum macrumors 6502

    d_saum

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    #13
    Forget that!!! You can get a huge rear projection HDTV now for like $800!!! Check the specials in the sunday paper! I have a 53" Sony and it is the ONLY way to play my xbox/ps2/gamecube!!!! ;)

    I can't wait to see it in all its HD glory when I get my 360 and ps3!!!
    :D
     
  14. TheGimp macrumors 6502

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    #14
    I checked this site out and, even though the "HD Mate" seems like a nifty product, the Apple Displays are not HDCP compliant so any money spent now on this gadget will not, for example, let you watch HD-DVDs from either a set top box or the HD-DVD drive announced for the 360. In the Gefen forums (makers of "HD mate"), one of the tech staff/moderators said right off the bat (in response to an HDCP/HDMI question) that the lack of HDCP compliance in current Apple Displays, taken together with the fact that Apple Displays do *natively* not support any of the "official" HD resolutions, seems to indicate that the purchase of a current Apple Display for (very near!) future HDTV/Hi-def consumer applications is not a good investment.

    It's a shame though, given my 23" Apple HD Display's exquisite renditions of still images and better-than adequate for moving video such as Apple's H.264 trailers (not games, however, I found the "pixel response time" to be wanting).

    Still, if one already owns one of these displays, doesn't mind being restricted to VGA/Component for xbox 360 (xbox 360 VGA looks great on the Samsung LCD panels), and provided of course that the "HD-Mate" performs as represented, then the $300 may be well spent. I had planned to use my Apple Display when the 360 came out, but ended up selling it and getting one of the lower res Sony XBR Bravia LCD HDTVs.
     
  15. djdarlek macrumors regular

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    #15
    SADLY i've already tried the VGA-DVI idea thinking that these monitors were just like any other. For what it's worth it didn't work, and the adapter is a pain. In Maplins I had to get a female to male VGA Adapter and then a Female to male DVI Adapter on the end. (I think) - plugged it in and was literally mortified to learn that it doesn't work. That's really pissed on my plan, I've got two 20"s and had planned to be able to do 360's via system link on them. There goes that idea!

    If anyone works out a non-$300 method PLEASE post here!
     
  16. benpatient macrumors 68000

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    #16
    sorry, no way around it...you got sucked into the reality distortion field, and it's digital only.
     
  17. benpatient macrumors 68000

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    #17
    Mind if I pry? what TV do you have? Is it a projector? What sort of scaler do you have? If you've got a 5-year-old display that would accept a 1080p INPUT and no scaler that could output 1080p, then what's the point? To my knowledge, the only 1080p-outputting scalers in 2000 or 2001 were over $30,000. Probably a lot more than that, to actually get one. Really curious about this.

    as for data rate, I wouldn't expect the data rate to be doubled, because so far there are no 60fps 1080p sources at all. There certainly isn't any media. The HD movies that are being 1080p'ed today are going to either 30fps or 24fps. Same approximate data rate as 1080i.
     
  18. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #18
    Er, there's no reality distortion going on, Apple explicitly states that the Cinema Displays are all-digital. They even have a page for it: http://www.apple.com/displays/digital.html
     
  19. benpatient macrumors 68000

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    #19
    ah, but they don't explicitly state that they've removed the analog option. The last-generation ACDs had a "pure digital" connection, too. But they also included an analog decoder just in case your source couldn't output digital.

    Apple saved a couple of bucks and half an inch of silicon wafer space by removing the analog processing from their monitor. Nothing about offering an analog option lessens the quality of a natively digital display when powered by a digital-out from a graphics card. In fact, a graphics card with a DVI analog/digital connection that's hooked up to an LCD with both analog and digital DVI decoding capabilities will always pick up on the digital signal first.

    for the 30", this limitation makes sense. But not for the 20 or 23.
     
  20. TheGimp macrumors 6502

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    #20
    I can say for sure that the 23" Aluminum does not support DVI-I. I spoke with a knowledgeable Applecare rep, and also read an excerpt from the service manual.
     
  21. benpatient macrumors 68000

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    #21
    listen, i know that. i'm saying that the ones before the current ones, which accepted a completely digital input, also accepted an anlog DVI input, and it didn't effect the quality of the digital signal in any way, shape, or form. Apple cut support for analog because it will help force hardware sales and because it saved them $2.75 or something similar per display in chip costs.

    It's lame.
     
  22. nimbus macrumors regular

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    #22
    Tres cool.

    I wonder will it work on the PS3 also. Nonetheless, good finding. Or as my Harvard alum would say "cheerio oh pup."

    :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
     
  23. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #23
    I was curious as well, because to my knowledge, there were no 1080p devices 5 years ago. Yes, there were devices capable of 1920x1080 in a progressively scanned mode, but no 'official HD' devices. They would be computer monitors and such. And there haven't even been 1080i 'televisions' on the market for more than 2-3 years. Extremely-high-end monitors, yes. The kind used in the HD production field. But nothing that I would classify as a 'television' (which, to me, implies consumer-oriented, if high end, and purchasable by the general public.)

    (A little Googling reveals a 1080i 'television' in 1999, but the first 1080p wasn't until January of last year (there were devices capable of taking 1080p input, but didn't actually have the capability of displaying at 1080p, like my current one.) To top it off, it appears nobody actually started shipping until August '05. And I can find innuendo to projectors capable of 1080p having been available for longer, but not much, one HD source says Sony's ultra-expensive Qualia line had a 1080p model in 2003, the earliest confirmed 1080p I can find, and it could only take 1080p input over a VGA port. Sorry, clayj, but you CAN'T have had a 1080p 'television' for 5 years.)
     
  24. FireArse macrumors 6502a

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    #24
    BBC had them years ago!

    In May of last year, I attended the BBC's Reasearch and Development Open Day. There, they've been working on High Definiton for DECADES. I saw a 1080p TV and noticed it looked very old - they replied over 7 years. I was shocked, but sure enough, it displayed 1080p.

    Was it Sony or Panasonic? Anyway, the proffessional stuff has been that way for years, literally. If you get a chance to go (Kingswood) GO!

    So - are people saying the acrylic 23's (the one's before the Aluminium's) can play 360 output?!
     
  25. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

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    #25
    Again, I meant commercially available. Obviously research centers have had development units longer.

    And, no, none of Apple's DVI or ACD LCD screens have analog input, they are all pure-digital-signal only. (With the older acrylic models, you'd even need an ADC -> DVI converter for $100, on top of the $300 converter mentioned here.) The last Apple LCD to have analog input was the original style "Apple Studio Display" that shipped at the same time as the Blue & White G3. It had a VGA connector. When the G4s came out, they updated it to Graphite, and switched it to DVI. Then a few months later came the acrylic monitors, the 22" 'Cinema Display' first, then the 15" and 17" models that matched it. They, at first, used DVI, but switched soon thereafter to ADC. Apple did have an ADC CRT monitor that used an analog signal over the ADC connection; but no converter was ever made for that to make it VGA. (Their ADC to DVI adapter specifically mentions that it is NOT compatible with the CRT ADC monitors, presumably because the DVI connection is digital only, and wouldn't pass through the CRT's analog signal.)
     

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