Police State, Here We Come

Discussion in 'Community' started by IJ Reilly, Feb 10, 2003.

  1. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #1
    Perspectives: Ashcroft's worrisome spy plans
    By Declan McCullagh
    February 10, 2003, 4:00 AM PT

    WASHINGTON--Attorney General John Ashcroft wants even more power to snoop on the Internet, spy on private conversations and install secret microphones, spyware and keystroke loggers.

    Ashcroft's Justice Department has quietly crafted a whopping 120-page proposal that represents the boldest attack yet on our electronic privacy in the name of thwarting future terrorist attacks. The nonpartisan Center for Public Integrity posted the draft legislation, which reads like J. Edgar Hoover's wish list, on its Web site Friday.

    [...]


    Center for Public Integrity Report
    Now with Bill Moyers Report
     
  2. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #2
    Do you really do that much online that you're worried about someone seeing it?

    Its not like someone is going to be viewing your email and downloads directly - its all going to be filtered by computers and only things with the right trends and key words are going to be flagged.

    Electronic monitoring isn't all that big a deal if you ask me, and its done by enough companies now, why should it really matter all that much?

    D
     
  3. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #3
    I believe you are missing the point. This is the Patriot Act, squared. Invasions of privacy used to require due process and the involvement of the courts. Ashcroft wants the power to operate secretly and without oversight. If you're not old enough to remember how these powers can be abused, I suggest you do a Google search on "J. Edgar Hoover."

    In his wildest dreams, Hoover would never had expected this kind of authority to spy on the American people, yet he managed to do plenty of it anyway.
     
  4. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #4
    I'm more than aware of the laws, I was just pointing out that with the amount of information that is generated on a daily basis, it will require supercomputers and terabytes of data crunching to even make it viable. Its not going to be cheap.

    It won't go through the way he wants it, but putting up some sort of safeguard is not a bad idea. Its just a matter of time before wars will trickle over to the web and cause havoc for us all.

    And then there is the issue of encription. There are plenty of easily available encription systems that you can use to make your data, email, etc. safe if you are that concerned about it.

    D
     
  5. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #5
    Well again, these new proposals go way beyond technological surveillance -- they strike at the heart of what we used to call due process and judicial oversight of law enforcement. We should not need encryption to escape a government that not only invades our privacy, but demands the complete authority to do so under the cloak of darkness.

    At some point we have to understand who is the enemy here. The Bush administration is making it quite clear that they believe that the enemy is the American citizen.
     

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