Port fowarding w/ linksys router

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by nsutt22, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. nsutt22 macrumors regular

    nsutt22

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    #1
    I wanna port foward my router to my g4 tower so I can access outside of my house. I have a linksys router and i set it up to take port 8082 and send it to the pbooks IP but it isnt working. Is there something i am missing?

    EDIT:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

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    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #2
    Something listening?

    Do you have something listening on that port on your tower? It's no different from a telephone...you can call a number all day long, but if there's no one at the other end to pick it up, you're SOL. So, stepping back a step, what's listening for requests on port 8082?
     
  3. nsutt22 thread starter macrumors regular

    nsutt22

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    #3
    my bad... i wanna use it for for sure http . i will turn on the web sharing service and then be able to connect via my outside IP to the tower. I also wanna do remote desktop and ftp.
     
  4. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

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    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #4
    First of all, is the G4 set up to always be at 192.168.1.103? Manual IP or "DHCP with manual IP" are required there (System Preferences...->Network), else it might not always be at that address.

    Also, web sharing is usually at port 80 (is yours set up for something else?), FTP is at 21, VNC (remote desktop) is at 5900 (and 5901, 5902, etc. if you use multiple displays) - these are the default ports; you might use different ones. Also, beware of FTP unless you know what you're doing - it's pretty easy to hack into. SCP, SFTP, etc. are better options.

    You need to be sure these ports aren't stopped by the Mac's firewall (System Prefs...->Sharing->Firewall) as well.
     
  5. nsutt22 thread starter macrumors regular

    nsutt22

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    May 5, 2005
    #5
    thanks a bunch! So ftp will only work on 21 and http only on 80 etc etc?
     
  6. Queso macrumors G4

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    Mar 4, 2006
    #6
    Yes, unless you've specifically changed them to work on other ports.
     
  7. superbovine macrumors 68030

    superbovine

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    Nov 7, 2003
    #7
    supertechincal ftp is 20/21 TCP with 20 being console and 21 being data. however, 21 should work just fine. however, if you run it problems might try adding 20/tcp as well.
     
  8. Timepass macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    #8
    if you are stilling having a lot of problem first thing to do is make sure the mac is in working order.

    To do that is set that computer to be DMZ host on the router and that forwards everything there. If you cannt get it workign that way then somethign else is wrong because that removes the router from the equestion in finding the problem.

    Then from there for for port forwarding.

    Also make sure the IP is corect since linksy does not allow you to give a static IP to a computer so it will always have that ip when it connects (somethign I wish they would add)
     
  9. nsutt22 thread starter macrumors regular

    nsutt22

    Joined:
    May 5, 2005
    #9
    Thanks a bunch everybody. I believe someone got a linksys to hold a manual IP if they put it out of the set range of IP's. I am not sure though. I will try to find the thread.
     
  10. Timepass macrumors 65816

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    Jan 4, 2005
    #10
    only way I know how to do that is use a 3rd party firm ware.
     
  11. Str8edgepunker macrumors 6502

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    Nov 4, 2001
    Location:
    Philadelphia, PA
    #11
    You could always just set up DMZ on the router for that IP address. Of course that's akin to connecting your computer directly to the internet and opens up all your ports to attacks.
     
  12. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #12
    Static IP?

    I was under the impression (perhaps wrongly so) that the IP of the router, as the outside worlds sees it, is always the same as the cable/DSL modem's? I would also assume that most non-business cable/DSL internet plans these days come with DHCP'd IP addresses. What can you do with the firmware of the router to guarantee that your IP always stays the same? Internally, of course, you set the IP, so it's always the same. It's also possible I'm mis-reading the above replies....and if that's the case, ignore that whole last paragraph. :eek:

    Assuming I'm correct so far (a potentially big assumption), the only way to ensure your IP never changes is to request a static IP from your ISP (could cost money), or use a DynDNS account instead. Of the two, I'd go with the DynDNS account because it's free and will ultimately be easier to remember in (words not numbers). You'll need one or the other to keep you from having to check your IP (automatically or otherwise) everyday to make sure you're the address you're typing in is still your box...

    Link to DynDNS: http://www.dyndns.com/

    On a side note, I'd highly recommend AGAINST putting your computer in the DMZ unless it's the only option you have left. Putting a computer that may not be properly secured or have all the up-to-date security patches on relatively out-dated binaries is just asking for trouble...
     
  13. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    New England
    #13
    :confused: Linkysys has usually defaulted to assigning 192.168.1.100 as the first address available to DHCP. If you manually assign a machine behind the firewall the local IP address of 192.168.1.99 it'll keep that one for good without third party firmware...

    B
     
  14. regre7 macrumors 6502

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    Apr 18, 2006
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    Atlanta, GA
    #14
    Sorry for the semi-off-topic post, but WTF is port forwarding?
     
  15. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

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    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #15
    Your router accepts traffic on many inbound ports at a given IP address. It's like the IP address is an apartment complex's address, and the port is an individual apartment number.

    Anyway, port forwarding involves taking inbound packets assigned to a certain port (like 80 for web traffic) and sending them to a particular computer attached to that router. Ports which are not forwarded are effectively ignored because, in most cases, the router itself won't deal with them.
     
  16. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    New England
    #16
    A controlled breach in your firewall to allow services behind the firewall to be avaiable on the outside.

    B
     
  17. regre7 macrumors 6502

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    Atlanta, GA
    #17
    So I could access, for instance, file and printer sharing on my Windows machine at home if I'm sipping coffee at my local Starbucks?
     
  18. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    New England
    #18
    Yeah, but for that you'd really prefer to use a VPN.

    B
     
  19. nsutt22 thread starter macrumors regular

    nsutt22

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    May 5, 2005
  20. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

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