Power Mac G5 - how many HDDs and is RAID possible?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by ascender, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    #1
    I'm looking to try and solve my storage and backup problems just now and was thinking that a G5 machine might be the answer. We have a dual 1.8GHz G5 tower sitting here doing nothing, so I was wondering if its possible to fit 4 new 1TB drives to it and get a RAID card?

    I notice that there's two HDD drive bays at the top, but is there any other way to expand the number of drives it can hold?

    I'll have a look on here to see if there's any RAID cards available for it, but if anyone knows, that would be a help too.

    Thanks!

    Edit:

    Would a card like this allow me to do software RAID 5 via Leopard? This machine is going to be used as a backup server, so speed isn't a major issue which I'm guessing would be the main advantage of going with a hardware RAID controller.
     
  2. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #2
    The Sonnet card: No, as it only listed RAID 0,1,10. :(

    The RocketRAID 2210 could serve your needs (4 int. drives RAID5), and is OS X compatible. It's available at provantage.com, for $168.73USD. Cheaper, and they ship to the UK as well. :D You could also try span.com, as I didn't check there.

    As for squeezing in drives, the Sonnet G5 Jive would help. :) It would allow you to install a total of 5 drives. :D Also available at provantage.com for $72.74USD.

    Added up, $139.373 GBP + VAT + s/h. (Used xe.com for currency conversion).

    Hope this helps. :)
     
  3. macrumors 6502

    iamcheerful

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #3
    Try modding the Pro Drive ...

    Given that you are intending to use it as a backup server, I would suggest (as stated in the Title), if you do not mind some hands on experiences, modding the Pro Drive offered by Transintl.com.

    Alternatively, you can have a complete diy solution applying the Pro Drive's concept.

    Why 2.5", simply because they are apparently more reliable (typically able to sustain higher Gs). Also, supposedly lower power consumption over the 3.5" counterparts. I myself have always toyed with the idea of having 2.5" in desktops and 3.5" in portables simply just for the fun of it. And NO, my solutions ain't neat at all. I totally appreciate the companies than come up with elegant solutions.

    There's a more detailed analysis over at Barefeats.
     
  4. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #4
    This is definitely an interesting product, but the OP is using a G5, not a (2006 or newer) Mac Pro. :( Different internal layout.
     
  5. macrumors 6502

    iamcheerful

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #5
    @nanofrog & others:
    with ref. to my post above, thus i mentioned "modding the ..." or perform a "complete diy ..." ;) unfortunately, it certainly will not be a simple online purchase and plug&play solution.

    @TS:
    MAXupgrades's MaxConnect concept may apply to your G5 model. You may wish to explore this area too.
     
  6. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2008
    #6
    You can fit in 11 hard drives if you remove the DVD drive.
     
  7. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #7
    If there wasn't "some assembly required", then it wouldn't be DIY. ;) :p
    That would take all the fun out of it (cut hands and fingers, loud swearing....). :eek: :D
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    iamcheerful

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #8
    hi-5, nanofrog :)

    hi-5! :apple:
     
  9. thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    #9
    Thanks for all the info. Not sure why I was bothered about RAID 5 as this will be a backup of fairly static information, so I'll just create a striped set out of the drives. Love the look of that Jive unit to hold 3 HDDs. I'd also forgotten just how well thought-out the inside of PowerMacs were.
     
  10. macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #10
    Nothing to be scared about on RAID 5. :)
    Use enterprise drives, and you reduce your risk of failure greatly compared to consumer drives. I know a lot of people use the consumer units, but I've seen too many early failures in this scenario. RAID 0 is a particular problem, as when 1 drive fails, everything is lost. OK if you have everything backed up, can afford the down time, and a new replacement. :eek: ;)

    Good luck. :D
     
  11. macrumors 6502

    iamcheerful

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2008
    #11
    You may try the popsicle method. It is more affordable than the Jive/MaxConnect.
     

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