PowerMac 8500/150

Discussion in 'Apple Collectors' started by Eidorian, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #1
    I just got ahold of this wonderful classic Mac. It has 160 MB of RAM on it right now and a 2 GB hard drive. It has 8.6 installed on it. Since the old girl is so old I can just take it home for free.

    First thing since I know very little about Classic.

    1. How do you remove applications? Is it the same drag to trash routine?

    2. Installing more RAM. The RAM for this thing is dirt cheap. Would getting it up to say 256 MB help it?

    3. Installing the RAM. I've dug around the case a bit. Getting to the RAM is nearly impossible right now. How do you do it?
     
  2. joecool85 macrumors 65816

    joecool85

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Location:
    Maine
    #2
    Well, it depends on what you are doing with it. If you are just running 8.6 or even 9, adding ram won't make a huge difference unless you want to run old versions of photoshop. I guess we just need to know what you want to do with it.
     
  3. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #3
    MS Office 2001 and FileMaker Pro are installed on it. I just want Mozilla to stop complaining.

    160 MB does seem to work for now.

    I'm not sure if the CD-ROM on it works though. It just locks up and won't mount a CD. What I WOULD like to know is removing applications. It has Norton and Virex on it.


    Edit: I found the Mac OS 8.6 8500 System CD! And it mounted perfectly! We also have Photoshop 6.0. Since it's so old I might be able to have it for free!
     
  4. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #4
    Yes. There may in a few cases be Extensions or Control panels related to the application, and there will certainly be items in the Preferences folder in the System Folder

    More RAM is always better. Keep in mind it is NOT PC66 or PC100 RAM - it is an earlier standard.

    [/QUOTE]

    You need to remove the logic board from the machine -- about 15 minutes and a Phillips screwdriver each time :( Be CAREFUL with the connectors, especially the ones hiding inside the machine, not on the top edge where most of them live. Go to Lowendmac.com and look up the model - you'll probably find good takeapart instructions there.

    I don't want to be a party pooper but if these applications have been used to upgrade to a newer version that is currently in use by the original owner, they are not permitted to be given to you. Likewise if they are part of an educational or commercial site-license. If the seller has discontinued using
    the software entirely (and they are not under a non-resaleable license), they should be able to give you the CDs, serials and a transfer of license so that you can legitimately use the software.
     
  5. rjphoto macrumors 6502a

    rjphoto

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2005
    #5
    You are right about the 8500 being a great machine. I bought mine new in 1985 and it is still running. It's had a few upgrades, RAM, Hard drive, Processor (G3-300)

    Anyway, to your questions;
    1. drag them to the trash.
    2. you can never have too much RAM.
    3. Close, but not impossible. You have to unplug all of the cables and drop the mother board. It's a pain better left to a professional...
    You may still be able to find the instructions on Apples support site.

    Good luck
     
  6. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #6
    I'll stick with 160 MB of RAM. I've already been to LowEndMac and it seems like a nightmare to do it myself.

    Would there be any benefit of reinstalling the OS? I don't want to carry around any illegal software on my machine. Norton is only single license and I can get it for my machine. Office might be a bit harder. I'll never use FileMaker Pro so that's easily removed.

    Is 9.0.4 that much better to try to install it on my machine?
     
  7. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #7
    I've done it W-a-a-y too many times...

    9 should be fine. I think it'll go to 9.1 but I'm not sure.

    One good investment is a Firewire/USB card so you can use modern peripherals. A more expensive thought is an ATA/IDE interface card so you can install inexpensive large hard drives and CD burners. I had a Sonnet Tempo Trio (combines all 3) in my 8500.
     
  8. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #8
    I'm not planing on spending much on this machine. I'm only asking about the OS since I only have the 8.6 CD. I was wondering if it was worth searching for an Any Mac 9.x disc.

    I'll give another look on LowEndMac.

    I've been posting on the PowerMac the entire time. :D
     
  9. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    Mar 23, 2005
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    #9
    Just one last question. What's the best Classic web browser available?
     
  10. 5300cs macrumors 68000

    5300cs

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #10
    If you can get up to OS 9.1 (I think) then Mozilla is good. It's heavy, but it can display CSS properly (Communicator cannot.)

    Internet Explorer 5.1(?) isn't bad, but it's M$ :rolleyes:

    iCab is also okay.
     
  11. RacerX macrumors 65832

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    #11
    As pointed out, it depends on how you want to use the system. The 8500 series has a physical maximum of 1 GB of RAM, so you have plenty of room.

    The design of the 7500/8500/9500/7600/8600/9600 series systems was that if you installed DIMMs in pairs (there are two banks of four slots) the system will treat the two DIMMs as one single DIMM when writing to memory (it is called memory interleave). This is not a requirement of installing memory, but can have performance benefits.

    Yeah... the 8500 uses the single worse case design of any that Apple has ever made. That case (used in the Quadra 800/840av and the Power Macintosh 8100/8500) is, to date, the only case design that I've ever walked away from bleeding after servicing one.

    I currently own two systems with that case design, an 8500 (in storage) and a 8100 (my primary old Mac OS system). I actually use a 7500 (currently acting as a file and internal web server) rather than the 8500 because of the case design.

    To remove the logic board you need to remove the restart button assembly (lower front corner), remove the processor daughter card (and any PCI cards), disconnect the AV unit ribbon (attached near the daughter card), remove (across the top of the logic board, from back to front) the SCSI ribbon, the power supply cable, the speaker cable, the CD-ROM audio cable, the floppy drive cable and a second power supply cable. Then unscrew the single screw in the center of the logic board, and push the board forward (towards the front of the system about half an inch (so the external ports clear the case). There is then a plastic tab between the SCSI cable connection and the first power supply connection that can be moved up (slightly) to let the logic board swing down and away from the system freely.

    You then have access to the RAM, VRAM and L2 cache slots on the logic board. Be sure to hit the reset button (small red button near the daughter card slot) after installing RAM and the like.

    Someone pointed out that it would be better to let a professional handle this... that is probably the best suggestion. I service Macs for a living, so I've done this countless times. But I've also gotten calls to help get systems back up and running after someone has tried to do this on their own with this case design.

    The reinstalling question... only if the system is not running properly.

    As for putting a version of Mac OS 9 on it, I wouldn't. But then again, I'm not much of a fan of Mac OS 9.

    My 8100 (which has 208 MB of RAM and a G3/500 upgrade) is running Mac OS 8.6. So is my PowerBook 2300c (which has 56 MB of RAM). Why? Because 8.6 was (in my opinion) the peak of the old Mac OS in terms of performance and stability.

    The only reason that I have ever recommended installing Mac OS 9 on systems that could run Mac OS 8.6 is to run apps that require Mac OS 9.x.x (like iTunes). Otherwise, Mac OS 9 is a crash prone system that is also a terrible memory hog (64 MB of RAM is the absolute minimum I would install it on, and usually I recommend 128 MB).

    My 8.6 systems rarely give me any problems where as I get calls every couple weeks for the Mac OS 9 systems in use by my clients.

    Still, if you are going to put 9 on that system, I would suggest 9.1. It was the most stable of all the 9.x.x releases. You can force 9.2.2 onto that system, but I wouldn't suggest it (unless you absolutely have to have 9.2.x to run some piece of software you need).

    While I hate recommending anything Microsoft, Internet Explorer 5.1.7 is a nice browser... but just like the Mac OS X version, it is painfully out of date. There is also Netscape Communicator 4.8 (also very out of date) and Netscape 7.0.2 (which is pretty current, but tend to be a little unstable... even for a browser).

    There a couple ports of Mozilla (1.2.1 and 1.3.1) that should work, and versions of iCab and Opera.


    Hope that helps out a little.
     
  12. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #12
    One hell of a time warp. ;)


    Stick with that amount of RAM. OS 8 doesn't need much to run, and you can increase the amount an app is allowed to have by selecting the app and pressing Command+I.

    Stay with 8.6, that's the best MacOS (personally, pre-X)

    I would vote for a clean install, so long as you have the software disks, because of extension conflicts which are a pain. Also because of fragmentation. Instead of defragging you can just wipe it.

    If you want to use it as a server, stick a $5 10/100Base-T Ethernet card in there. Make your network faster (well, at least for that machine)
     
  13. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #13
    I'm just going to stick with the 160 MB it already have onboard. Mac OS 8.6 seems to the be best option for performance and software compatibility.

    I already have Internet Explorer 5.1.7 installed. I think I'll go with Mozilla or iCab next. Opera worked but its Classic version still had ads in it. Netscape 7.0.2 seems a bit much for the old machine.

    There's one more application I'm looking for. A media player. I just need a Classic application that can play MP3/AAC's. It doesn't need to be fancy or anything. It just needs to be able to play some music.
     
  14. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #14

    I know!

    Linkety for iTunes 1 on 8.6

    Linkety to Audion.

    Linkety to SoundJam.
     
  15. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    Mar 23, 2005
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    Indianapolis
    #15
    The first one is a hack and the last two are share/trialware. Anything free?
     
  16. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #16
    Audion is free. Doesn't anyone read anymore? And the iTunes hack is because iTunes 1 was written for OS 9 and up, but if you want iTunes, you have to use the hack.
     
  17. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    Mar 23, 2005
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    Indianapolis
    #17
    Yeah, I think I'll be able to live with 30 minute music sessions. Yes, I read it. :p
     
  18. joecool85 macrumors 65816

    joecool85

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Location:
    Maine
    #18
    I would upgrade it to 9...its much better than 8.6 I will say it seems a little less stable though, but not too bad. I ran 8.6 for a couple months on my beige g3 when I got it 6 months ago, now it has 9.2.2 and it will have 10.2.8 soon enough. Your machine should top out at 9.1 (without hacking) and I've seen people (slowly) run os x on those boxes. btw, don't buy the 9 cd on welovemacs or the like, WAY to expensive. I got mine on here for $20 shipped and my 10.2.x cds for $10 shipped!
     
  19. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #19
    In the red text on the download site... :)

    Or this website is a helluva of a lot clearer:
    Linkety
     
  20. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #20
    Now that's MUCH clearer.
     
  21. 840quadra Moderator

    840quadra

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Location:
    Twin Cities Minnesota
    #21
    MpegDec MP3 Player

    It is a good player, and I use it on my Quadra (yes you CAN play MP3's on an 840av :) )

    [​IMG]
     
  22. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #22
    I've already fallen in love with Audion. Thanks anyways. I have SEVERAL spare 16 MB ATI Rage 128 PCI Video cards from gutted PowerMac G3's. Would those work in the PM 8500?
     
  23. joecool85 macrumors 65816

    joecool85

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Location:
    Maine
    #23
    They should work just fine. Can I have one? My beige could use a boost in vid ram.
     
  24. Eidorian thread starter macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

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    Mar 23, 2005
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    Indianapolis
    #24
    Well I might be able to give it away. It is technically salvage.
     
  25. joecool85 macrumors 65816

    joecool85

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2005
    Location:
    Maine
    #25
    Is it yours? lol. Anyway, if you are interested I will definetly buy one/pay for shipping if you give it away or whatever. I just want one :) 16mb of vid ram is way better than the 6mb I have in it now.
     

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