Prebinding Update Question

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by wsteineker, Jul 5, 2002.

  1. wsteineker macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
    #1
    So here's the deal guys. I am looking to speed up my performance a bit, and have read in other threads in the forum that updating my prebindings is the best way to go about this. I downloaded a prebinding update program called XOptimize and ran it. After optimizing 907 files, I see NO improvement in either boot time or program load time. Did I miss a step here? Is there a better way to go about updating my prebindings? Thanks for the input guys. :)
     
  2. Nipsy macrumors 65816

    Nipsy

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    #2
    As I understand it, the update prebinding routine has a visible effect only after something significant changes in the software setup.

    That is why OS updates, and complex software installs show 'Optimizing' before exiting. If you have been following the OS update routine, or have installed software recently, chances are your prebindings don't need updating.

    The best ways to speed up OSX (from a software perspective), are to make sure you have no orphaned processes, make sure you have all system daemons you aren't using turned off, and logout every few days to kill anything not owned by the OS.

    On thing you should check if you have to reboot is disk consistency. An orphaned node, or incorrect file count can cause slowdowns as the OS searches for a record. Your can check and repai an OSX disk by booting in single user mode, waiting for the prompt, and typing fsck -y. When fsck -y reports the disk is healthy, type reboot.

    Unless you see a speed decrease, there is not a lot you can do to create a speed increase. OSX is a lot better at maintaining itself than Mac users are used to, so in some cases preventative maintainence won't help, and in more severe cases preventative maintainence can cause harm.
     
  3. wsteineker thread starter macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
    #3
    Word. Thanks Nipsy. Quick question. How do I boot into single user mode? Thanks for all the help man.
     
  4. Nipsy macrumors 65816

    Nipsy

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    #4
    Hold down command-s after the boot chime.

    It'll look very unixy, and eventually you'll get a prompt with an fsck hint.
     
  5. wsteineker thread starter macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
    #5
    Dig it. Thanks Nipsy. One last thing and then I'll leave you alone. I don't get a boot chime. I get a click when my speakers power up (pro speakers + isub). If I just hold it from the moment that I hit the power button will i be ok?
     
  6. Nipsy macrumors 65816

    Nipsy

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2002
    #6
    Probably be fine...you'll know you've suceeded when the screen goes black & texty instead of blue and Aqua-ey.
     
  7. wsteineker thread starter macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
  8. mmmdreg macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #8
    has your computer actually decreased on speed since you got it?
     
  9. wsteineker thread starter macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
    #9
    Not so much an overall decrease as a little bit of choppiness every now and then. I was looking for a way to ease that a bit, and there are no decent OS X native drive utilities.
     
  10. mmcneil macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #10
    Other ideas for speedup

    I'm running a 400Mhz Lombard so looking system speedups are a way of life. I have seen several articles, all with different ideas, the most recent:


    http://www.insanely-great.com/news.php?id=610

    Tweak X for performance
    By ron carlson, Insanely Great Mac
    July 4th 2002

    There are some additional suggestions for disabling processes that you do not use in /system/library/Startupitems. SendMail, apache, appletalk, appleshare are good candidates. Just move them to a new folder e.g. StartupItemsDisabled.

    Last but not least, you might consider a separate swap partition. This is particularly effective if you have a second hard drive.
     
  11. wsteineker thread starter macrumors 6502a

    wsteineker

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2001
    Location:
    Montgomery, AL
    #11
    Just make a new folder right there in startup items and move the unwanted folders into it? Is it really that simple? :) BTW, what does SendMail do? Thanks man!
     
  12. mmcneil macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #12
    StartupItemsDisabled & Sendmail

    You have to do all the new folder and moving as an administrator and probably within the terminal application. DO NOT move anything you aren't absolutely certain what it does :p

    sendmail is a unix application that allows you to do all email sending directly from your computer vice through your ISP. Once you have it configured, you then configure your email app to send via localhost vice smtp.mac.com. If you want specifics there is a current thread that has some references.
     
  13. mmcneil macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2001
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    #14
    Drive utilities

    I recently upgraded to SystemWorks 2.0 to solve a drive problem under OS X. I booted from the CD (9.2) and it fixed the problem and then I used Speeddisk to optimize the disk. I honestly think it helped OS X performance. The basic concept of the file system is still that fragmentation slows down the system.:)
     

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