Professional Photographer's Ingenious Marketing

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Shacklebolt, Mar 20, 2013.

  1. macrumors 6502a

    Shacklebolt

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    #1
  2. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #2
    Just a quick look, but I'd say there was at least 3 lights. Main light to the left and just a bit higher than eye height (from the camera's perspective), one tucked in behind the fellow and aimed at the background, one to right and slightly further back than the main light, aimed at the fellow's back.

    Haven't decided if there is a fourth softer light just above the camera acting as a fill, or whether it is just a big reflector.

    Don't know about the Ps techniques. But keep in mind that in the "good ol' days" a photographer was expected to be able to shoot this onto a transparency.... no post-production required. So, I would say that if the photographer was good enough, then the Ps work could have been minimal.

    Thanks for sharing that article!
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    ijohn.8.80

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    Location:
    Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
    #3
    Over on this page, the photographer says:
    Further down the replies he also says:
    I have no idea how many flashes he used to make the picture you queried about, but did find his replies/comments interesting. No taking hours fussing over lighting setups.

    I'm currently doing a flash photography module in my course because I have to, I'll never use it afterwards, I much prefer the simplicity of my 5-in-1 reflectors and considering I don't do people shots, I have no need to lug around lighting.
     
  4. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    #4
    Have fun using your fancy 5-in-1 reflectors when there's no light to reflect.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    ijohn.8.80

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    Location:
    Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
    #5
    Sorry? The Sun is about to extinguish once and for all? :eek:

    There is this amazing device called a tripod and they even fold up these days, they allow you to take long exposure shots to get more light down the barrel of the lens and onto the sensor. Perfect for overcast days.

    WTF dude? Why get all pi$$y because I don't feel the need to use flashes? I don't do people shots or insects or anything else that requires them, my bad... :eek:
     
  6. El Cabong, Mar 21, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013

    macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    #6
    I think one high on the left to create the shadow from the hard hat and the reflection on the red pipes, and a kicker behind him/to the right. Maybe a fill coming in from the right to put some shine on that blue thing and while accentuating the shadows around his hands/legs/face.

    Edit: Also used a longer lens.
     
  7. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #7
    Not to cast a cloud into your sunny day... but the photographer we are talking about specialized in shooting in mines. Notable for not having many sunny days.
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    #8
    Bingo.

    Not to mention the fallacy logic that only "certain content" requires lighting. He should just drop the course he's in right now, if he's absolutely sure he'll never need to apply the knowledge he's learning right now.
     
  9. MCH-1138, Mar 21, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2013

    macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    Location:
    California
    #9
    ijohn.8.80 only said that he doesn't see a need for artificial lighting for his style of photography. Nothing wrong with that. It doesn't sound like he plans to specialize in shooting in mines.

    Is lighting "only" for portraiture and macro? No, all photography is about light. But that doesn't mean that everyone has to use flash, strobes, etc. It's an artistic decision.

    And to keep this post at least somewhat on-topic, I think the "crappy vs. snappy" idea is an interesting one and that the website does a nice job of illustrating differences that may be difficult to conceptualize but that are easy to see when comparing two photos (i.e., differences in composition, lighting, etc.).
     

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