Programming

Discussion in 'Community' started by alxths, Dec 18, 2003.

  1. alxths macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #1
    Well the term's finally finished and i've got free time once again, so i'm thinking about learning how to program. I know nothing about programming though, so i really dont know what my optoins are..

    I'm a psych student and have always had a lot of interest in A.I. so i'd like to learn a language that i could use to make cognitive models, and just play around with making 'thinking' programs... I think the only necessity for this would be a format that would let me create programs that could actively alter its own coding while running...

    Can anybody out there recommend a language to me? I'm running panther, if that makes any difference... Does anyone know of any good resources for learning programming?

    thanks
     
  2. cubist macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2002
    Location:
    Muncie, Indiana
    #2
    I thought "Learning Cocoa" was alright, but I've been programming for over 25 years. Besides, Objective C is not going to get you to your cognitive AI; you need something like Scheme or Common Lisp.
     
  3. Stelliform macrumors 68000

    Stelliform

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2002
    #3
    Lisp and scheme are the preferred languages for coding AI, but there is a pretty big learning curve.

    Good luck.

    By the way, I have never spent much time on it, but I have an interest also. What is the best software for coding in Lisp on OSX?
     
  4. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #4
    not exactly what you'd call high end, but this is fun to learn... kind of a replacement for Shockwave/Flash(Lingo/Actionscript) but not really what you want to learn A.I. with... :p

    http://www.proce55ing.net/
     
  5. alxths thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    #5
    hmm. scheme seems interesting.. i've been reading about it here.

    I checked out processing after you mentioned it in some other thread, igav, but from what i saw in the examples, it doesn't seem to be what i'm looking for..

    thanks for the suggestions
     
  6. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #6
    You could play around with CLIPS. It's more an academic exercise, but I did some stuff with it in my graduate studies last year just to get the feel of how an expert system does it's thing.
     
  7. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #7
    Forgot to mention, CLIPS is free. Here is a place you can download it.

    It's good for messing around with if you're not planning on doing any real work with it, but not for doing much real-world stuff.
     
  8. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #8
    LISP and Prolog are the two languages which have been used in most books on the subject of A.I.

    Common LISP is available as is the LISP interpreter in emacs (not eMacs) for programming macros. You can find several examples of working LISP code including a game or two.

    It may be interesting to some of you that LISP was used as the language for the original text adventure Zork as well as the more recent Abuse.
     
  9. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #9
    my friend who teaches ai has basically told me that it's a field truly in its infancy and we are years away from a thinking machine and his extrapolations has put the technology a couple of hundred years from now and that has been his post doctorate work after stanford and mit

    he mentions he likes prolog and he is a fan of java

    programming will reach ai one day perhaps but it has to approach it at an angle of being an art form more than a science and that is a bottleneck right now in the computer programming field...modern physics and mathematics is not a way to approach the issue of a thinking, judging, creating being or entity

    some feel that man is embarking on god's territory with artificial intelligence, but don't hold your breath to think it will happen in your lifetime:p :p
     
  10. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #10
    I didn't think it would be, when you mentioned A.I..... :eek: :p

    Processing, Lingo, Actionscript is about as hardcore as I get when it comes to programming.... never even heard of Scheme or Common Lisp.

    I don't think I'm smart enough to even consider using them, just incase I spawn something really nasty... :eek: :p :p
     
  11. mj_1903 macrumors 6502a

    mj_1903

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #11
    In my opinion prolog is the way to go, although right now I have been writing some AI routines in C with an Obj-C/Cocoa front end.

    I would suggest though learning as much about AI as possible. You may make a discovery in this thought process that you wold like to expand on, rather than working on the beaten track again. Remember, your guess on how to produce real AI is as good as mine at this time.

    Another thing you might want to study is a general area of interest. Right now I am researching human thoughts, emotions and languages in an attempt to replicate memory structures. Other people are in this field as well, but there are just as many people looking into basic organism AI, behavioural AI, group AI, etc.

    I cannot stress strongly enough though a basic language being under your belt before you dive in. Thanks to you being on Mac OS X you have more than enough languages to choose from. Either grab a scripting language, like Python or Perl and learn it back to front or go deeper for instance Java or even deeper, C and C++.

    Whatever you decide to do, good luck and have fun!
     
  12. ooartist macrumors member

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    Feb 2, 2002
    Location:
    Spring Hill, TN
    #12
  13. mj_1903 macrumors 6502a

    mj_1903

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #13
    Re: You Should Try Smalltalk!

    Or you could just use Obj-C. ;)
     
  14. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #14
    Re: Re: You Should Try Smalltalk!

    You can cheat by using procedural code in Objective-C. You can't do that in Smalltalk.

    I can't count all the people I've seen working in C++ who were just writing C code. ;)
     

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