Prosthetic Bone Grows With Maturing Children

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by wdlove, Jan 16, 2004.

  1. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #1
    OVERLAND PARK, Kan. -- A 12-year-old Kansas boy is recovering after he received a new prosthetic bone on Thursday that will actually grow with him as he matures. It is called a Repiphysis Implant.

    http://www.thebostonchannel.com/health/2770089/detail.html?treets=bos&tml=bos_health&ts=T&tmi=bos_health_1_12150101162004

    Information about the Repiphysis Implant. This is great news for children that have traumatic surgery to amputate a leg. This will prevent additional surgeries and the prothestic devices. :)

    http://www.wmt.com/Patients/oncology/repiphysis.asp
     
  2. joker2 macrumors 6502a

    joker2

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    #2
    Wow, this should help make things less traumatic for some kids... I'm impressed with the technology, allowing the child back to playing soccer by summer.
     
  3. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    I have a friend that goes to the same Church and is a neighbor. His daughter had an above the knee leg amputation more than a year ago. It's too bad that this Repiphysis Implant wasn't available then. She also had to indure chemothereapy for 6 months, caused her to be very sick.

    The amazing healing power of a child. She was off the crutches the minute that her doctor said it was OK. She is doing great now, not that noticeable that she is an amputee.
     
  4. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    I saw something on TV about those not too long ago. Doctors move a round magnet over the leg, and it grows a bit, probably hurts a bit though :(
     
  5. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    This is done very gradually, so to not cause pain. It ends the need for addditional painful surgeries and rehabiliation.

    "REPIPHYSIS™ redefines bone replacement surgery for children and teens between the ages of five and about eighteen years of age. As children grow, so do their bones. The REPIPHYSIS™ enables children to have their ‘replacement bone’ grow with them without repetitive and traumatic surgeries.
    The REPIPHYSIS™ works by inserting an expandable implant made from titanium in an aerospace polymer into the child’s healthy bone, after which standard recovery and rehabilitation are expected. However, instead of undergoing repeated surgeries to extend the bone, the REPIPHYSIS™ uses an electromagnetic field to slowly lengthen the implant internally.

    Physicians are able to monitor the lengthening through fluoroscopy and x-rays to determine the amount of expansion achieved. Children undergo the simple procedure as their body grows, so the number of visits varies with each child. As the child’s growth stops, a GUARDIAN® Limb Salvage System product could be implanted for continued years of success.
    This expansion procedure is done within a matter of minutes without surgery or anesthetic, and, unlike traditional procedures, recovery and rehabilitation are not needed afterwards. Children simply get up and walk out of the doctor’s office. Talk to your pediatric orthopaedic surgeon about the benefits of the REPIPHYSIS™ and how it can help your child. "
     
  6. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    I wonder if they can feel the implant gorwing...

    *shudders just thinking about it*
     
  7. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    I think I'd rather feel the implat growing than get cut open after every significant growth spurt.


    Lethal
     
  8. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    The adjustments are minute enough that the child would barely notice. The new implant is so that the child doesn't experience the discomfort of the past.
     
  9. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    Well then...
    I still don't like thinking about it :p
     
  10. wdlove thread starter macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Here is a very mature uoung lady Caitlynne McGaff, 9, battled a rare form of bone cancer and now wears a prosthetic leg.

    The diagnosis of osteo-sarcoma, bone cancer, came in March of 2002 when Caitlynne was just 7-years-old.

    Caitlynne's family had two surgical options. One, remove the cancerous bone and replace it with metal rods. That would give her a normal looking leg, but would also mean more surgeries, possibly every six-months, to account for her growth spurts.

    She didn't want to have multiple painful surgeries. So she chose the second option. She is a member of my Church. Her family is very supportive.



    http://www.thebostonchannel.com/health/2771575/detail.html?treets=bos&tml=bos_health&ts=T&tmi=bos_health_1_12150101202004
     

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