Put to Katrina's Test

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by IJ Reilly, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #1
    This is a lengthy article, but well worth reading. In fact it ought to be mandatory reading for anyone who cares to have an opinion about the response to Katrina.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-plan11sep11,0,2153804.story
     
  2. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2002
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    Republic of Ukistan
    #2
    It is a long read, isn't it? But worthwhile, even though it gets a bit ragged towards the end.

    I wonder, however, what will happen - and how perceptions will change - if/when the final death toll comes in at around 900? Will that make a difference? Since a large amount of the insurance was ultimately held in Bermuda, Switzerland and Germany, the financial results may not be that dire either.
     
  3. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Palookaville
    #3
    Two questions here really.

    If the death toll is much smaller than originally feared, then obviously everybody will breath a sigh of relief, not least of all those who were responsible for the response. Still, I think the question has to be asked: how many of those people had to die? If rescue operations been instituted quickly and efficiently, how many of the dead could have been saved? Also, the question of thousands of people living for days in wretched conditions while the various agencies fumbled unforgivably will still loom large. I don't think anyone is going to forget those images any time soon.

    As for the cost, in the long and short terms -- well, we just don't know. But one thing I can say with confidence is that Americans do not want to see New Orleans abandoned or its recovery neglected. Despite what Dennis Hastert said initially, most of us recognize the cultural importance of this place. The reconstruction and rebirth of New Orleans is far more than an issue of who pays and how much. It should be as much a matter of national pride as rebuilding on the site of the World Trade Center -- and I think it will.
     

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