questions about editing a no-budget movie

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by j_tuff, Oct 26, 2004.

  1. j_tuff macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #1
    Okay guys, got one for you. I don't have much money and I want rough edit my movie and then take to my buddy to do the serious editing. I want to export out back to mini DV. My question: Can an ibook G3 accomplish that with an updated version of imovie (4). What problems do you think I'll run into. I wanted to use an external HD as well. What do you guys think. I have to be mobile, that's why I'm looking at the laptop.
     
  2. liketom macrumors 601

    liketom

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    Location:
    Lincoln,UK
    #2

    it will do it but slow , max the ram . also iMovie will do only 4:3 and also make sure your cam can accept in/out DV but sure why not
     
  3. liketom macrumors 601

    liketom

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    Location:
    Lincoln,UK
    #3
    o yeah and the 9 1/2 min rule as well , 2gb file size's i tend to split the video and add it together - maybe Final Cut Express 2.0 will help you out on this , 16:9 and will have more editing features
     
  4. hotwire132002 macrumors 65816

    hotwire132002

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2004
    Location:
    Cadillac, MI
    #4
    I've edited ony my old iBook G3 (Clamshell) and although the editing worked just fine, the export back to DV tape did not. It would skip and stutter during the export--I finally just saved it as a DV file and copied it to my G5 via Ethernet.

    Also, if you go too far back, the really old iBook G3s didn't have FireWire. Also, the clamshell iBook G3s ran at 800x600, so I'm pretty sure iMovie 4 won't run on those.

    As to the all-white iBook G3s, I have no experience with those, and they may very well do everything you need.
     
  5. Sayer macrumors 6502a

    Sayer

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #5
    Unless you are serious about editing on an iBook, I would recommend you just shoot all your video on as many tapes as it takes first. Then go to your "buddy" and worry about editing there. If you want to make rough cuts to see how scenes work together or as a reference just don't go crazy. DV takes up a LOT of hard drive space. Don't worry about exporting back to DV, it takes a lot of time and takes up more tape.

    When you shoot the tape (if you haven't already) I suggest making several takes of a scene. Sometimes after 5 takes the last one is the one you really want to use (the actors are more comfortable, or they add embellishments that may not occur to them or you in the first take).

    And don't think you won't need to do any storyboarding. Think about your shots, lay them out in some form and look at them. Put them away for a while and come back and see if you don't like them anymore. This can help save a lot of time/tape shooting a scene that just won't work. You don't have to shoot in a linear fashion, shoot related scenes at the same time to get the same light/look.

    Shoot reaction scenes later or make one tape of different reaction shots (two people in a scene, one is talking/doing something and that other person reacts). They can help fill in some gaps in the action or stretch out a scene.

    Write down a lot of info on your shots, and use a placard in the shot if you can with a scene number/reference, which take it is and/or any info you want to have in the tape about the shot (time of day, date). When you get to editing tape you may not remember exactly what is what. Watch all the tapes and take notes as to which scene/tape you really like and note about where in the tape the scenes are so you can get to them quickly.

    Tape tends to be cheap, don't skimp on shooting. And do NOT reuse tapes! Reusing a tape can degrade the data on it and reduce image quality. Erasing doesn't really get rid of everything that was on the tape. If you shoot outdoors let the tapes acclimate to the indoor environment for an hour or so to keep the tape from stretching. Garbage in, garbage out.

    Once you shoot and fill a tape take it out and mark it and pop the tab. You don't want to accidentally erase it. These are your Master tapes. Treat them like they are made of gold. If you mess up an edit (it will happen), you will need to reimport the tape. They can also be used for filler as a blooper real or "behind the scenes" if you want to be fancy.

    Lastly try to shoot related scenes at the same time of day at the same time of year. The best light is early morning (during sunrise) and early evening (during sundown). Don't shoot in the middle of the day outdoors or your scenes (actors) will all have horrible shadows and flat washed out lighting.

    Sound is 50% of a movie. Use a boom mic if you can with a directional microphone and a wind shield, or lapel mics. The camera's mic is all but useless outdoors or even indoors as it picks up all manner of sound (wind, air conditioners, traffic, the autofocus motor).

    Oh, autofocus should be off; focus manually ahead of time and don't zoom. Zooming is unnatural to human perception and should not be used in most situations. Pans and tilts should be slow and not stutter or stop abruptly for most scenes.
     
  6. j_tuff thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #6
    good info. i shot the whole movie already. my buddy works alot so getting by his place sometimes difficult. i at least wanted to put the scenes in order. what is the best way to accomplish that, considering the amount of space the DV will use. that's why i wanted to be able to export. whadya think?
     
  7. j_tuff thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    #7
    one more thing. i'm gonna use the white ibook g3.
     

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