quickie Intel mini vs. MacBook Pro comparison

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by ftaok, Mar 6, 2006.

  1. ftaok macrumors 601

    ftaok

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2002
    Location:
    East Coast
    #1
    Hey all. Thought some may be interested in some not-so-scientific benchmarks.

    Here's the particulars.

    1.67 Core Duo mini
    512MB RAM
    1650x1050 resolution

    1.83 MacBook Pro
    512MB RAM
    1440x900 resolution

    Apple Store - King of Prussia, PA

    I test both machines without the aid of a stopwatch. I created a new iMovie (version 6) project and added 2 photos to the time line with Ken Burns Effect ON. Then I added a fade out followed by a fade in transition.

    On each machine, after hitting the "Apply" button, a dialog popped up indicating that iMovie was importing the photo. Then the photo clip showed up in the timeline with the obligatory red progress indicator.

    The mini "seemed" to be much faster than the MBP. I would estimate that the mini took about 2 to 3 seconds to process the photo while the MBP took about 4 to 5 seconds. The fade in/out transitions took about 1 second on both machines.

    I was very surprised with the performance of the mini. However, I was a little disappointed with the playback of a 1080p movie trailer (Talledgea Nights). Of course, the baby was hungry and the Apple Stores bandwith was lacking. The entire trailer hadn't finished downloading when I was playing the clip. The actual FPS dropped down to about 16 (out of 24) in a few instances. I'm hoping that it was just because it was still downloading that made the video choppy.

    ft
     
  2. Shamus macrumors 6502a

    Shamus

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2006
    #2
    id dare say that the frame skipping would be because of the mediocre graphics in the mini.
     
  3. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #3
    Yeah, the shared video memory more than likely impaired the FPS for the video. Still, they appear to be rather fast machines for rendering and encoding.
     

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