Racism still a Big Issue in America

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by carbonmotion, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. carbonmotion, Feb 27, 2004
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  2. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #2
    Who's the comedian who does the routine where he's in an elevator speaking Spanish so the whities can't understand him then he gets all pissed off 'cause he can't understand the Chinese guys and he says something to them like "This is America! Speak Spanish!"
     
  3. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

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    #3
    Canada still has racial issues. Most Anglophones (English Speakers) hate Francophones (French Speakers) causing huge debates, and Many Quebeccers to want to leave Canada. Also there are huge resentments between the White, Indian, First Nations (Native Americans), and Asian persons. They just hide the conflicts in the government, instead of voicing opinions out like the U.S. does.
     
  4. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

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    #4
    We've got racism here in NZ too. I'm not too sure of the details, but the Maoris (natives) get better treatment from the Government than the rest of us.
     
  5. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Sounds like a Paul Rodriguez sketch.
     
  6. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #6
    I think that Racism is a virtual non-issue. You will always have some person vent and use something in order to characterize the issue they are venting at. It could be race, it could be gender, it could be job status, it could be financial status.

    I would vent sometimes, and I vent because they are women drivers. Or I would vent at times because they are blacks with their radios on too loud.
     
  7. candan9019 macrumors regular

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    #7
    Some French hate English speakers too, it goes both ways. People are more tollerant up here but thats not to say that there isn't racism. The government doesn't hide it they just try to please everyone which keeps things at a slightly lower level than it is in the States.

    One thing I have noticed is many people dislike Americans. Since I lived in the U.S. for so long some think I'm American and are kinda rude. They need to realize people are people.
     
  8. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #8
    How big of an issue is Racism in the next generation? I was brought up a Home schooled kid. Not at all sheltered, except for the CURRENT issues with racism. I live in a small town called "White Salmon", and though it's named for the Fish that populate the many rivers, there is *MAYBE* 5 black families within 20 miles. I was raised to not have any predigest towards any color of skin (a Black man even married into the family and is now my uncle, great guy, funny). But I always believed that racism was still a big problem, just not as bad as the 60s (well, no sh*t, I know :D)

    BUT

    I've gotten to talking to some of my big city friends about the subject. They believe that Racism isn't an issue hardly at ALL these days. They all have african-american friends that don't mind what you call them, and joke around with names. It's a very open topic, and among college and under kids it isn't a huge deal. I've started to experience this myself. And though I haven't had a chance to ask a minority if he feels oppressed because of his race, many of my friends (again from the city) say their friends don't feel anything at all.

    So perhaps kids of todays generation are being raised right? Or perhaps living in the NW has something to do with it...

    That said, there will ALWAYS be people with a predigest towards people. And the way it works, the majority will always be able to in act, both verbal and physical, they predigest then those that are the minority, and get away with it.

    Anyone have similar experiences?
     
  9. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #9
    do your black, asian and arab friends agree with you?

    excuse me while i go order some Freedom Fries.
     
  10. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #10
    Reminds me of this joke:

    A Latino walked into his favorite Mexican restaurant and sat down at the table. He was surprised when his waiter turned out to be a young Chinese man, who took his order in broken, heavily-accented Spanish. When he was finished with his meal, the man tracked down the restaurant owner, and asks him, "Where did you ever find a Chinese guy who speaks Spanish?"

    "Shssh!" the owner says, "He thinks he's learning English!"
     
  11. Taft macrumors 65816

    Taft

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    #11
    I would agree that overt racism in urban america is far more rare than it used to be. However, I still think there is a fair amount of institutional racism in many cities. Further, while racism may be in decline, segregation remains an issue.

    For example, in Chicago there is a very diverse population. In fact, I believe there are more minorities living in the city of Chicago than there are whites (not sure on that actually). Anyway, while Chicago may be statistically diverse, you would never know it if you stayed in certain parts of the city. Virtually all of the black population lives on the West and South sides and virtually all of the white population lives on the North/Northwest side.

    This type of situation is common in America's cities and it leads to some pretty serious problems in terms of crime, access to education, access to elected officials, access to other city services (including public transportation), etc.

    Also, things like racial profiling still run rampant. I've been told by more than one cabbie in Chicago that they will usually not pick up black men. They say something like, "Those _____ don't pay half the time and will mug you the other half." Besides being ridiculously wrong, its a pretty racist statement. I've also read many stories about racial profiling from cops, as well. (I know this evidence is only anecdotal, but...) My black friends have also told me of many similar instances of such treatment.

    My point is this: while racism (at least overt racism) may be on the decline, the problems that have traditionally accompanied racism are often still present. Until blacks and other minorities are more integrated into "white society" there will continually be an imbalance in quality of life and the ability to receive fair treatment accross the board.

    I look forward to the day when race isn't an issue any more. Unfortunately, I think we are still a long ways away from that point.

    Taft
     
  12. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #12
    As my post says, I grew up in a town with no Minorities my own age (except Mexicans, and as a soccer player, there isn't anything but respect there). But my friends that live in the city who have cross culture friendships say that their African-American friends don't think it is an issue in their personal life. Of course my friends could be lying, but they have no reason to, not in the context our conversation was in.
     
  13. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #13
    if that's how they truly feel, that's great. i don't think that's been everyone's experience.

    a long time ago, i met this guy, who happened to be black. he proposed an experiment: we walked down the street together. i've never been stared at so much. because he lived in a predominately white area, he said that's what it's like for him all the time.
     
  14. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #14
     
  15. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

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    #15
    My uncle got the same thing in our 99.99% white town. But if I were to walk down the street wearing a clown suit people would look at me, and they'd look at you if you were walking with me.

    I think they look because it is out of the ordinary. Not because they harbor some hated towards Blacks, and would be less then polite to your friend if he were to ask for, say directions (at least compared to a white man, but we don't ask for directions...).

    I do know how predigest and preconceived notions are for people, and I know from first hand experience :mad:

    Tyler
     
  16. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #16
    Racism is not the issue it was 30 or 40 years ago, I assure you, but it is still there.

    People aren't able to be quite so overt about it. I never see anyone from a minority group being asked to leave a store because the owner or manager doesn't like "their kind" as I used to have happen. I don't think anyone would dare.

    Obviously, after 11 September 2001, there were many attacks against people who looked like some person's idea of a muslim. These people still have to be careful.

    Generally, if I hear anything around this area, it's in Spanish and against anyone who isn't hispanic. I suppose this grinds against my thinking that people who live here should be speaking English in the U.S.A., so I speak Japanese to them. :D I guess that makes me a hypocrite.

    Understanding and communication with the world has certainly changed things. It used to be that most people got their view of the world from ridiculous films and war broadcasts over the radio. It was easy to hate another race when you didn't know them. It's easy to hate what you don't understand.
     
  17. carbonmotion, Feb 27, 2004
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  18. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    Dunno. I don't talk to my black, asian and arab friends about racism. I only talk to my black, asian and arab friend about why the operating system is doing what its doing, about what the computer chip is doing, and about why the cad software sucks so much.

    In my microcosm of the world, only the performance of their duties matter to me. That, and if they buy drinks for me. :p
     
  19. carbonmotion, Feb 27, 2004
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2011
  20. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #20
    That makes me really sad because blacks were the caring group when I was young. The whites were the ones always beating me up or telling me where to sit or whatever. :(
     
  21. m4rc macrumors 6502

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    #21
    It all depends on where you are. Larger cities people may appear to be less racist because they will walk along the road and not stare at an Asian guy, or an Arabic lady, but this may be because they see so many people of so many races everyday, How they act when they are with theirfriends getting drunk, or if a person from a different race asked them a question, is different. And I mean this in every combination, whether it is a white person in a black neighbourhood or vice versa.

    My Step-Son is mixed race. We had loads of trouble and racial aggression towards him and us when we lived in London, we now live in a small (97,000) town, mainly white (97.2%) and we have had only one incident at his school, where the kid concerned was expelled and relocated. I did wonder if we would have more people 'looking' at us as we go about our business, or my friends would change when I introduced my Son to them, but this has just not happened at all. As I said, I had more trouble in a supposedly racial diverse and modern city, but I think many more people just keep quiet about their feelings and beliefs.

    Seperate subject, but their is a well documented case of an (Asian?) guy in the UK who sends his CV (resume) to a company for a job as himself - he is a well qualified, well educated guy - and the same CV with a traditional British name and obviosuly slightly changes the details. Basically, the 2 CV's look like two different people, but they both have the same skills, knowledge and education.

    More often than not, the fake CV is the one the company would like to interview, and the guy gets a letter saying 'no thanks' for his genuine CV. He then takes the company to Court. He is living off of his court case winnings.

    This has caused outrage from both camps, some say he should get a job, some say what he is doing is a good thing. It does show however that racism is not dead, it may not be so prevailant, but it is still there, maybe just better hidden.

    Marc
     
  22. Taft macrumors 65816

    Taft

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    #22
    Still kicking...

    Here's an article from the Chicago Tribune today:

     
  23. 2jaded2care macrumors 6502

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    #23
    IMHO, racism begins with the faulty logic that, "if someone looks like me, they are like me". (Of course, this spawns the corollary, "if someone looks like that, they fit my preconceived notion of what that is".) It might seem logical, but experience proves otherwise.

    While I like to think myself not racist (being of mixed race myself), I will admit to being "classist" in a sense. I do believe that my middle-class values are preferable to what I consider the lower-class values of certain people. Not talking about blue-collar workers, for example, but rather the people who don't think it's unusual for the police to be called out to their house every month or two to resolve some situation. This goes whether they're white, brown, green or purple.

    IOW, I try to judge people as individuals, by their actions, not as a "group".
     
  24. Mav451 macrumors 68000

    Mav451

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    #24
    2jaded2care - I think you probably have said the best approach, and that is to approach everyone as an individual and judge them on what you know about the person SPECIFICALLY.

    Some people may say racism is down, its up, or whatever. The thing is that it varies on the culture of the area. Even in the US, East Coast and West Coast have immensely different cultures. Boston/New England area has its own culture just like the Midwest (e.g. Illinois) will. And how bout the differences between high school and college? Most kids at college are pretty open to talk bout this (that's why I like college compared to high school, alot of open forum on this).

    Racism is going to be around forever. The same way people will always base everything on FIRST IMPRESSIONS, people in general will always have a personal bias. Yeah everyone's human, but when we're not comparing humans to aliens, than there's more of a difference.
     

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