Rapping Terrorists

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by MoparShaha, Feb 9, 2004.

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  1. MoparShaha macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

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    #1
  2. KC9AIC macrumors 6502

    KC9AIC

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    #2
    I think it's sick and disturbing. But no less than many other rap tunes....:(
     
  3. MoparShaha thread starter macrumors 68000

    MoparShaha

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    #3
    I agree, but it's so rediculous. I mean seriously, what do they think these songs will achieve? Are teenagers going to want to join Al Quaida because a song has cool beats?
     
  4. gwuMACaddict macrumors 68040

    gwuMACaddict

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    #4
    disgusting... plain and smimple... utterly disgusting

    :( :( :(
     
  5. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    i wonder if it will get many people to join. you have to give them an A for effort, even though its twisted.
     
  6. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #6
    How is this different than any other rap music?

    It all promotes violence.
     
  7. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    Stereotype Alert! Stereotype Alert! All rap promotes violence? Really?

    And how is this different than Skrewdriver?
     
  8. etoiles macrumors 6502a

    etoiles

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    #8
    how about you actually check out what is out there before making such 'informed' statements...

    http://www.lyricsondemand.com/b/blackaliciouslyrics/

    I can post many more if you are interested
     
  9. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #9
    Those lines were in the first two songs on the site, and you are telling me that this doesn't promote violence?
     
  10. etoiles macrumors 6502a

    etoiles

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    #10
    regarding the original subject: pretty disturbing indeed, but nothing new. For example, there is a plethora of neo-nazi 'punk', racist 'country' etc. Music is a very powerful form of expression, sad it is getting abused in so many ways...
     
  11. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    No question this promotes violence, and there are many examples you could show that contain violent lyrics. But you said
    Absolutes are seldom true. Not ALL rap music promotes violence.
     
  12. etoiles macrumors 6502a

    etoiles

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    first line: he says VERBAL god, 'foes' are ideas, words, concepts...

    second line: he his condemning 'prostitution and pimping, robbing and stealing', don't just cut out one line !!

    You can't just take words out of their context, you need to read the whole thing and understand it. Yes, if just reading the word 'murder' makes you want to be physically violent, then these texts are not good for you (you as in: any person this applies to, I am not being personal here). But then you shouldn't watch the news, read the bible or Shakespeare...
     
  13. 1macker1 macrumors 65816

    1macker1

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    Yeah, that's why apple choose their flight commercial to be a rap song. Which has been voted to be the best. So in turn, apple is promoting violence.
     
  14. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #14
    You could surely make some music and call it rap music and then say that all rap music isn't violent, but you could also paint grass blue and say that all grass isn't green.

    Rap music was created as a expression of violence and any music that deviates from this isn't true rap music.
     
  15. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    Please give us your version of how rap was 'created'. I'd like to know.
     
  16. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #16
    Dippo I know this is a internet forum and you can basicaly throw out all the nonsensical opinions you want anonymously. But such inflexible, zealous, uninformed thinking probably accounts for more than half of the worlds problems.

    Be part of the cure man, not the cause.


    To get on topic again, they are probably doing this song for shock value, and to illustrate some people still feel frustrated at what's going on in the world. Regardless it's in poor taste and won't amount to much in the grand scheme of things.
     
  17. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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  18. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #18
    Lol, you don't actually believe this stuff do you?

    That site is disgusting. And comes real close to outright racist statements. I guess they haven't looked to see what color Eminem is.
     
  19. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #19
    Honestly no, I don't believe what this sites says, but it is very interesting compared to the recent news storys about terrorist rap. That article was written almost a year ago.

    The color of the skin is not what is important, it is the culture that these "artists" convery which make them who they are.
     
  20. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #20
    All you had to do was say something like "So much of rap music is full of violence." and I would have agreed with you. But you chose the absolute statement, declaring that all rap music is violent, which just makes you look ignorant to anyone who's listened to groups like Black Eyed Peas.
     
  21. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    #21
    Man, that's just weird. Sort of strikes me like a miserably misguided attempt to be cool (sort of like that Microsoft Matrix parody), but then again maybe it really will reach out to disinfranchised youth who enjoy rap music and modern culture, but might be sympathetic to this cause.

    Then again, even though some rap music is an expression of outrage at an unjust situation (poverty and urban violence), a lot more these days seems to be singing the praises of decadence, and it's a distinctly urban American "invention", neither of which is exactly a popular thing with most fundamentalist Islamic terrorists. Sort of like promoting weight loss with an all-you-can-eat buffett dinner.

    Very good point. Yes, some rap does promote violence (and other unhealthy concepts--mysogeny, etc). But saying "all of it" is like saying all Americans are fat idiots--true of many, and a tempting generalization to make, but far from the truth, as is any overly broad statement.

    Oh, and grass, due to photosynthesis, is largely green by necessity. Rap, on the other hand, has no fundamental attachment to violent lyrics, though frustration at inner-city poverty and violence is a major influence on its existance and style.
     
  22. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #22
    There's a big difference between the cars a rap artist drives, and that of a terrorist rap artist.

    The rap artist might drive something that'll get him a piece of tail, while the terrorist rapper drives something that'll explode and make pieces of tail.
     
  23. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    #23
    Black Eye Peas has lyrics that promote violence just as much as every other rap artist:

    Just to be fair though, I am sure that there is some artist somewhere that doesn't produce violent rap, but that would be called poetry, not rap.
     
  24. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #24
    And to you that's on the same level as Tupac and Eminem?

    How about other forms of music that talk about violence? Should we go after those too? I hear the 1812 Overture glorifies war.

    Oh, I see by your edit you do see the need to modify your original statment. Good job. Unfortunately for you it is still called rap even if it's not violent. Sadly rap has become synonomous with excess and violence, but violence is not part of the definition of rap.
     
  25. medea macrumors 68030

    medea

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    #25
    You need to educated yourself and learn a little about the history of hip-hop. I would suggest starting you pick up "Kurtis Blow presents the history of Hip-Hop" vol's 1,2 & 3.
    or at least read the liner notes.
    "In the early 1970s a musical genre was born in the crime-ridden neighborhoods of the South Bronx. Gifted teenagers with plenty of imagination but little cash began to forge a new style from spare parts. Hip-hop, as it was then known, was a product of pure streetwise ingenuity; extracting rhythms and melodies from existing records and mixing them up with searing poetry chronicling life in the 'hood, hip-hop spilled out of the ghetto.

    From the housing projects hip-hop poured onto the streets and subways, taking root in Bronx clubs like the Savoy Manor Ballroom, Ecstasy Garage, Club 371, The Disco Fever, and the T-Connection. From there it spread downtown to the Renaissance Ballroom, Hotel Diplomat, the Roxy, and The Fun House. It migrated to Los Angeles, where a whole West Coast hip-hop scene developed, sporting its own musical idiosyncrasies, its own wild style.

    Through television shows like BET's Rap City and Yo! MTV Raps and a succession of Hollywood movies, hip-hop gained millions of new fans across America, in places far removed from the genre's Bronx roots. It spread to Europe, Asia, Africa, and nearly every continent on Earth, gaining more cultural significance as the years rolled by. Today it is one of the most potent and successful musical forms of the 20th Century.

    Hip-hop is the voice of a generation that refused to be silenced by urban poverty, a local phenomenon fueled with so much passion and truth it could not help but reach the entire world. Like every musical genre that came before, hip-hop has its pioneers, artists who were essential in defining and popularizing the art form. This CD series showcases those legendary artists -- their songs and their enormous talents -- who created what today is known as rap.

    The History Of Rap. How can we truthfully tell this story? There are so many different versions. Who is correct? There were approximately ten different pioneers, each of whom stakes a claim as the originator: Pete DJ Jones, Kool DJ Herc, DJ Hollywood, Eddie Cheeba, "Love Bug" Starski, Grand Master Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, Kurtis Blow, the Sugarhill Gang, Run DMC.

    The names fit together like pieces to a puzzle. And as we assemble the puzzle, we have to give equal props to all, because it is the individual contributions, pieced together, that explain the true history of this billion-dollar-a-year phenomenon. "
     
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