Readers' Choice: MP3 Players Survey

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1
  2. macrumors 65816

    jholzner

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    "We also notice that reader satisfaction with MP3 players increases as the capacity *increases—and this applies even with iPods. Readers are much less happy with players with less than 1GB of storage—like the iPod shuffle—than they are with hard drive-based and large-capacity flash *storage-based units."

    Interesting. They are unhappy with Apple's players if they don't hold enough. I Think Apple clearly states how much storage is included and how much media it will hold. Sounds like consumers donn't know how to make a purchase.
     
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    mkrishnan

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    ^^ True, but that is not necessarily likely to change. And because a customer is dissatisfied because of their ignorance doesn't magically help the bottom line....

    Anyway, Apple is open to criticism merely because they are the benchmark. But there are some interesting things going on here, I think. I don't understand the difference between the "Repairs" and "Percentage Needing Repairs" categories... but if they mean something like perceived vs. actual (i.e. how in the major automotive ratings, some consider actual warranty repairs and others include customer complaints that may not indicate an actual part failure, but rather a limitation of the design or due to customer abuse?). Whatever the Repairs category means, it appears the data is incomplete.

    Nonetheless, it's interesting that there is a statistically significant difference between the reported 1-2% rate for Sony and Panasonic and the 8% for Apple... I wonder if that has to do with the product mix and the relative failure rates of components, or if it has to do with other issues, including the more infamous Apple quality debacles in the recent past.
     
  4. macrumors Core

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    or perhaps the simple fact that there are more iPods thus more need fixing?
     
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    mkrishnan

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    The margin of error for the iPod estimate is likely to be smaller by virtue of the large number of owners. But that would not lead to a statistically significant increase in rate of repairs.... So assuming their statistics are at least of a half-ass level of competence, I think that can't be the explanation.
     
  6. macrumors G4

    Applespider

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    um... iPods get used and taken out more thus being more subject to damage than Panasonics which get left in a drawer? Just kidding... if those numbers can really be backed up and compared (defects v cosmetic issues v perceived accidental damage) then Apple need to get their fingers out.
     
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    mkrishnan

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    Actually....

    I wouldn't completely trash that hypothesis. Frequency of usage and the number of environments you feel comfortable using your device in *do* make a big difference. It's probably not everything by itself, but it may play some small role.... Certainly I have one or two "As seen on TV" gadgets around my house which are in pristine condition. :D Alongside my cowboy boots which get sadly little usage considering how much I spent on them. :eek: :D
     
  8. macrumors 6502

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    Apple makes way more players then any other company, so the number needing repair will obviusly be bigger then a company that doesn't make as many.
     
  9. Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Okay, let me try one more time.... :eek:

    Say you have 11,000 identical music players, made by company X in Shanghai, and sold to companies Y and Z for distribution. Company Y is wildly popular and uses 10k of them, and the other 1k are sold by Z. However, they're exactly the same device, so the failure rate is expected to be the same.

    If 10% of the devices fail, a larger *number* of company Y devices (1000) fail than company Z (100). But the *RATE* is still 10%.

    On the other hand, if the *RATE* is different between companies Y and Z, then the number of devices sold by itself cannot explain the phenomenon, and the failure rate must be due to some other factor.
     

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