Really REALLY hot Macbook..

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by british724, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. macrumors member

    british724

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Indy
    #1
    And not hot in the good way...

    I turned my Macbook off for about three hours to watch a movie. I hadn't had it on any longer than an hour prior to turning it off.

    But after picking it up to turn it back on just now, I practically burned my hand on it. It's been off for THREE hours...

    I'm assuming this is a bad sign. However, I know I didn't overwork it prior to turning it off. No hissing or mooing.

    Any suggestions? I mean could this be a serious problem?
     
  2. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    #2

    Download CoreDuoTemp and you'll be able to monitor your temperature as well as CPU usage. Report back when you have some solid numbers.
     
  3. Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #3
    If it's literally too hot to touch, take it back.
     
  4. macrumors 6502a

    chosenwolf

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #4
    Mine goes up to 70C which is extremely HOT. If yours is any hotter than 70C, then you need to take it back.
     
  5. thread starter macrumors member

    british724

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Indy
    #5
    66 C

    Bad?
     
  6. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    #6
    Did you not notice it was really hot before you turned it off? If you waited 3 hours that means it could only have been a lot hotter before you turned it off; and if it was hotter than "Really REALLY hot" it could only be Super EXTRA hot. Don't ask us if it's a serious problem, ask yourself. If it was really that hot take it back.
     
  7. thread starter macrumors member

    british724

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Indy
    #7
    Well I don't know what is considered "normal"

    I've heard Mac laptops get hot pretty fast, and I've never had a Mac or a laptop before so I don't know what I'm meant to expect...
     
  8. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    #8
    True, but if I had one and it was so hot it was uncomfortable for my physical self I wouldn't care what "normal" was. Use it some more and see for yourself. I used them at the Apple store and they did not seem very hot at all though I've heard some people have said just the opposite. If you're not over-exaggerating you may have to seek a replacement.
     
  9. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    #9
    sorry to say, but if the guys at your apple store are like the guys at the 3 different apple stores ive been to, theyll just say that "macbooks were made to run hot" and that "the macbooks can get so hot that they have the potential to burn, so dont use it on your lap."

    i took my macbook in because of the moo and power adapter sizzle, and was told by all 3 stores that they are "within spec." while there, i overheard conversations about macbook/macbook pro owners who were asking about the heat, and the geniuses got pretty defensive about it. they were saying how the user manual clearly says how it has the potential to burn and that one isn't supposed to use it on their lap or put it on the bed, and how the bottom is supposed to have clearance so the heat could flow out. funny thing was, the complaining customers never had it on their lap or on carpet or on the bed... just on their table, and it got too hot. mine was in the 60s/70s as well. got toasty while web surfing and chatting, but only got REALLY hot when i was playing a dvd, or burning a cd/dvd, or doing anything that constantly used the optical drive.

    chris
     
  10. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    #10
    I didn't say I listened to any of the Apple employees, I mean I actually used them for a while and did not think they were hot. In fact, while I was there I corrected several employees on false things they were telling customers. They probably really wanted me to leave. If I were you I wouldn't drive to the stores, the employees are a bit... under-qualified. I can never get anything done unless I ask for the manager. Give AppleCare a call and tell them you won't have it and you want a replacement.
     
  11. thread starter macrumors member

    british724

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Indy
    #11
    I went in this past weekend and asked for some help and they pretty much caught me at the door and proceeded to shuffle me out without helping me.

    I mean I obviously have it on my lap at some times.. it's a laptop... if I wanted to sit at a desk all the time with it, I would've just invested in a nice desktop computer. But I got the laptop because I knew I'd be utilizing it while traveling or outdoors or in a classroom.

    *sigh*

    All I know is that it's extremely hot, and 70C seems pretty ridiculous.

    All this "within spec" crap is starting to piss me off. I guess its my fault for buying it?
     
  12. Moderator emeritus

    EricNau

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #12
    No, it's not your fault. If they tell you it's "within spec" tell them they are wrong. Tell them you aren't using it on your lap, but it's too hot to even pick up and move. Ask them if that's stated in the manual (make sure it's not first ...you never know).
     
  13. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    #13
    Your "fault" for buying it? Bad attitude. You got shuffled out? It's a great little machine and I would call Apple and get a new one. Though you may want to get a refund. Stand up for yourself. "Within-spec..." please.
     
  14. thread starter macrumors member

    british724

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2006
    Location:
    Indy
    #14
    Thanks guys :)

    I do really need to stick up for myself. They find it hard to take a small young lady seriously, especially when it comes to computers.
     
  15. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    #15
    i don't know why the "hot" issue has been coming up so much - maybe because there are so many new mac users? i am using an apple powerbook G4 Titanium 800 mhz and it always gets hot hot when using a few applications/playing dvd's/using windows media player. it even moos/hisses here and there. it doesn't really bother me to be honest.

    my new macbook is coming thurs. and i am not even concerned about the heat - more about the performance, etc.....as long as it is similar to my current G4 i will be content.

    just be happy your not using a PC and using an incredibly well designed computer w/ an easy to use interface....:)
     
  16. macrumors 6502a

    chosenwolf

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2006
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #16
    Because it's just about summer time and we REALLY feel the burn now! :p
     
  17. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #17
    The processor running at 70C is not the issue--that's not just within spec, it's industry standard to a degree. It may be good, it may be stupid, but that's what it is. My MBP's chip gets up that hot too. I also note I've used Dell laptops that got just as hot, and the fan on those was running constantly instead of never.

    However, the only part of the computer that's 70C is the processor itself, and that has very little heat capacity. I don't think it would be physically possible for a MacBook to have been entirely off for 3 hours straight in open air and still be too hot to touch--it would have been so hot the plastic would have melted when you first turned it off. Are you positive it was actually off for that 3 hours? Perhaps it had failed to go to sleep for some reason, and was instead running for 3 hours with the lid closed building up heat?

    As for your situation the question is twofold:

    1) How much of that heat is ending up where it's uncomfortable to the user (for example, the chips in my G5 tower run at least that hot, but all the heat goes out the back end as warm air, so you'd never feel it). The stripe above the keyboard on my MBP gets more or less too hot to touch under heavy load, but everywhere else, where I'm putting my hands, is warm at most.

    2) You should definitely stand up for yourself, but yours might *actually* be within spec. If it is in fact malfunctioning (say, the cooling paste issues that have been such a hulabaloo are causing heat buildup in an area of the case when it should be being vented by the fan), then replacing it for another one would improve the situation. If they're right that it's "within spec", then a replacement won't do you any good--the replacement would be just as hot.

    If that's the case, it's down to how much heat is acceptable to you personally. If it's not acceptable to you, you can either hope Apple updates the software to run the fans more, hence sacrificing noise for heat, or decide it's not the machine for you and try to return it or sell it.

    It's a bummer if you otherwise like the machine, but it's Apple's fault for not making a machine to suit your taste. Maybe the lost sale will teach Apple not to push the envelope quite so much.
     
  18. macrumors 68000

    CaptainCaveMann

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    #18
    Im confused on what your saying here. You powered off the computer and it heated up? Thats impossible. You put it to sleep and it heated up? What exactly did you do and what programs were running? :rolleyes:
     
  19. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Location:
    PA
    #19
    66C is considered normal. high 60s to high 70s is actually the range that ive seen on my macbook and macbooks in general. they just run that hot, if you dont like it then i guess you cant use it then.
    my parent's have a dell laptop and it doesnt run nearly as hot because its bigger, having more ventilation and the fans also run all the time. its the exact same sound as the 'mooing' except its constant.
     
  20. macrumors regular

    marchcapital

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    Location:
    Canada
    #20
    When you call Apple you will get tech support. Explain your situation and that you would really like to speak with customer service. when talking to ACS be very firm but polite when explaining your situation. tell them that the problem your having is unacceptable and not what you expected from a highly reptual company like Apple.

    Note that you will not get anything done on the first call. they will even tell you their is nothing they can do. then they will tell you that they will "escalate the issue" and call you back. (this is a good thing, when they tell you this, dont push the envelope and piss off the rep.) always remember to take names, phone #'s, and ext. etcetra that they can be reached at.

    when they call back after talking to "higher ups" they will most likley have good news(providing you have a reasonable case, which you seem to have)
     
  21. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    #21
    Yeah- Unfortunately if they have to replace your laptop on the spot- That's one less they can sell on the spot. Most service centers and Stores would rather you interface with apple directly rather than through them because it saves them hassle. But if they've been complete jerk-offs, just let a customer service/applecare rep know. Even buy applecare and say the genius had been a jerk just to let them know you're a serious buyer. (Drop the genius's name if you can- but dont do it unless he's been a jerk LOL.)
     
  22. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #22
    I was looking at one of those pads with fans underneath it, and decided to check out a couple of reviews. I thought this one was interesting for a couple of reasons:

    http://reviews.pimprig.com/cooling/vantec_lapcool3_notebook_cooler.php?page=2

    To test it, the guy put a temperature sensor right under the processor, and in the middle of the underside, of an IBM Thinkpad with a 1.8 GHz Pentium 4. Admittedly a HUGE laptop, more of a semi-mobile desktop, but still a fraction of the performance of a current MacBook. The interesting things were:

    A) At least on that notebook, the fans didn't move enough air to make any significant difference--2C drop, max. I'm reconsidering my purchase.
    B) Without the cooler, the area under the processor was 62C, and the middle of the case, several inches away was 58C.

    Now, the thermal reading you're getting from CoreDuoTemp should be from the processor's internal temperature sensor, so it would be the hottest part of the computer. You can bet that if the plastic case is registering 62C on the underside, the processor itself is hotter than that.

    Point being, numbers in the 60s for the processor core are NOT unusual, and MacBooks ain't the only hot laptops out there. I can say for certain that the middle of my MPB isn't at 58C, at least.

    (I should borrow the infra-red temperature gun from work and get an actual spot measurement for the case in various points. Might be interesting for reference.)
     
  23. macrumors 68000

    beatle888

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2002
    #23

    tell them that if they are going to sell a product that BURNS then they should have a label on the product so you can make a decision BEFORE you buy. they should have warned you and they didnt so you have the right for a refund.
     
  24. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2007
    #24
    My macbook is hot too~ It got up to 80C... It was on my lap.. now its on a table and its 78C. What should I do? I have apple care.

    I hope the its not burnt up inside.
     
  25. macrumors 68030

    FF_productions

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2005
    Location:
    Mt. Prospect, Illinois
    #25
    Make a new thread in the MacBook section.

    You are replying to a topic that is a year old.
     

Share This Page