rebuilding desktop in os x?

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by jefhatfield, Oct 28, 2002.

  1. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #1
    in os 9, i rebuild the desktop by booting up while holding down the bottom three left or right keys...this usually helps with most crashing and freeaing issues on my mac

    but how do you do a rebuild of desktop in os x? or does it need it?
    this os x machine i am looking at won't get off of sleep
     
  2. idkew macrumors 68020

    idkew

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2001
    Location:
    where the concrete to dirt ratio is better
    #2
    try fixing file permissions. this may be the new "rebuild desktop file." disc utility runs on each start up, so a restart could help also.
     
  3. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #3
    thank you, idkew ;)

    does that mean i have to make sure the user has the proper fields filled out in a menu in os x, or does that happen at restart anyway?
     
  4. crassusad44 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2001
    Location:
    Scandinavia
    #4
    Sorry if I sound like an idiot... but how do you fix file permissions, and how can a file permission go bad???
     
  5. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #5
    Permissions don't really "go bad" like an old sandwich you left in your desk drawer too long. The permissions on a file or folder contol who can see, read, or write the file or folder and they don't change by themselves. A program can set or change permissions on a file or folder. The problem is when one program or person thinks permissions should be set one way and another program or person thinks they should be another way.

    Example #1: When you create a file, it might have read/write permission for you (which makes sense), but not the permissions you intend for other users. If you don't bother to check or set permissions, another user may not be able to open a file you wanted them to be able to open, or they may be able to open a file you wanted protected. If you are the only user of this Mac and always use the same login name, you don't care about this.

    Example #2: Suppose Mac OS X comes with a file, set with certain permissions, but a third-party application you install changes those permissions. Mac OS X may not like this. Or, conversely, both Mac OS X and the third-party application might be happy until you install a Mac OS X update, which can reset the permissions and cause the third-party application to choke.

    You can change the permissions on a single file using the Get Info window or (for brave or careful people) with the Terminal application.

    You can change many permissions at once by running an installer or a utility program. I heard that the most recent version of the Disk Utility application has a Repair Privileges option and I think the Mac OS X 10.2 installer has this option too. Can others confirm this, since I've never had to use them myself?
     
  6. jettredmont macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2002
    #6
    I'm not sure how it happened, but it was a fairly common bug report around 10.1.5 that the "Applications" folder had read-only permissions for all users. You couldn't drag-drop an app into the Applications folder. This happened to me. I talked with Apple and got a link to the aforementioned "fix permissions" utility.

    You can, of course, also fix this by hand, but it requires "su root" (and the "root" account is disabled by default in OS X, so there's a whole process involved there) and then using "chmod" in the terminal window. Not for the faint of heart, nor for the traditional Mac user.

    I'm not sure if there are any other times/places/circumstances that give OS X files faulty permissions. I believe that the Applications permissions mess-up happened either during initial setup or during one of the early OS X hot fixes.
     
  7. idkew macrumors 68020

    idkew

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2001
    Location:
    where the concrete to dirt ratio is better
    #7
    generally from what i have heard and noticed, fixing file permissions gives you a speed boost b/c the OS is not sitting and thinking about permission problems. some people see a lot of speed, some people don't see much at all.

    to fix permissions, restart off of cd 1 of os x.2 installer and in the menu open disk utility. then you will see a fix permissions button in the new window.


    hope this helps.
     
  8. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000

Share This Page