Record DAT to a CD

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by bowens, Jul 27, 2006.

  1. bowens macrumors 6502a

    bowens

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    Jun 19, 2006
    Location:
    Trenton, FL
    #1
    I have a DAT (digital audio tape) that I recorded about 7 years ago. The guy my friend was taking guitar lessons from wanted to record one of our songs, so we went in and he recorded it for free for us. But he put it on a tape and a DAT. Now I want to put it on cd or on my computer. I would rather use the DAT since it would be alot higher quality than the tape. Is this something that studios would still have and would do for me pretty cheaply? I don't know if DATs are still used or not. There are a few studios about 30 miles from my house. Has anyone done anything like this? Is the quality very good? Thanks.
     

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  2. AviationFan macrumors 6502a

    AviationFan

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    Jan 12, 2006
    Location:
    Cedar Rapids, IA
    #2
    DAT is still in use today for professional recording, especially for audio in movie productions. There are companies that offer DAT-to-CD transfer for a fee; put the words "DAT" and "transfer" into google and you'll find some. Christec Media is one that I just found after a 30 second search (but I don't know anything about them, so don't consider this a recommendation).

    If you need to do this yourself, you can get the digital information from the DAT out of the S/PDIF connector that any good DAT recorder should have (coax or TOSLINK). I am not quite sure how to get this digital signal straight into a computer; maybe someone else can chime in here. If I had to do this with my current equipment, I'd use my solid-state digital recorder (which has an S/PDIF input) to convert the music into a WAV file, and then process it further to an audio CD.

    - Martin
     
  3. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    New England
    #3
    Recent Macs, including the OPs Inte mini, have optical compatible Audio I /O ports so you can just hook up the TOSLINK cable to the audio in with an adapter.

    B
     
  4. bowens thread starter macrumors 6502a

    bowens

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    Jun 19, 2006
    Location:
    Trenton, FL
    #4
    I don't have the equipment (a DAT player or recorder) to do it myself. I just need to get it on cd. I was really just wondering if they were still widely used, if the local studios here would be able to do it for me.
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #5
    I was just clarifying AviationFan's post in that it should be easy if you have access to a DAT deck with optical out, you're essentailly done.

    If local studios don't have DAT there are plenty of places online that offer this kind of service as AviationFan suggested. How much is it worth to you?

    B
     
  6. quigleybc macrumors 68030

    quigleybc

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    Jun 17, 2005
    Location:
    Beautiful Vancouver British Columbia, Canada
    #6
    If he was nice enough to record you for free, maybe he could burn it for you too?

    For him it would be as easy as pushing a button.....
     
  7. bowens thread starter macrumors 6502a

    bowens

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    #7
    Well, he's dead now. And back then he only had a tape recorder, no cd.
     
  8. quigleybc macrumors 68030

    quigleybc

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    #8

    Oh......:(
     
  9. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    Location:
    toronto
    #9
    what kind of tape? are we talking cassette or 1/4" reel to reel? converters technology has come a long way in 7 years and you may get better results starting from those analogue tapes and converting anew.

    just last month i did a cassette dump of an entire album into digital. this was a cassette which was:
    1. over 10 years old
    2. the only known surviving copy of the session
    3. played many times over the years

    i was stunned at how good it still sounded.
     
  10. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    #10
    I think the thread name and picture in the first post might be a good clue. ;)

    DAT.

    B
     
  11. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    toronto
    #11
    what kind of analog tape?

     
  12. LeeTom macrumors 68000

    LeeTom

    Joined:
    May 31, 2004
    #12
    one thing to keep in mind, is that dat tapes are typically recorded at 48khz, so if you can get it into your computer, record it onto a 16-bit, 48khz audio file, then resample it to 16-bit, 44.1khz before recording on CD.
    I'm pretty sure Toast and iTunes will do this conversion on the fly, but you'll still want to make sure you're recording it properly from the start.

    If you take it to a studio or transfer place, they'll probably know all that anyhow.

    Lee Tom
     
  13. bowens thread starter macrumors 6502a

    bowens

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    Trenton, FL
    #13
    I have it on a regular old cassette tape too. I just thought that transfering from the DAT would be a lot better quality.
     
  14. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    toronto
    #14
    probably, but not definitely. a whole bunch of things could have gone wrong with that DAT -- bad converters, bad levels, too many errors, etc.

    xfer both and let your ears decide.
     
  15. balamw Moderator

    balamw

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    #15
    Zim's right. The one thing you can be sure of is that the cassette transfer will sound no wore than the cassette, and you should be able to do it yourself (assuming you still have a cassette player).

    B
     
  16. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    Location:
    toronto
    #16
    when i do cassette xfers, i add 18 dB of gain (usually 18, anyway) using an FMR RNP to get the -10 cassette deck output to +4.
     

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