recover quicktime file from trash

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by swingerofbirch, Jul 9, 2006.

  1. swingerofbirch macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2003
    Location:
    The Amalgamated States of Central North America
    #1
    I was recording a podcast last night in quicktime pro when quicktime crashed (it has been a lot lately).

    I thought it was lost for good but today in the trash I founda file called QT1815022946-355-72ec1683-5e7727c6-3263b33b-922a3c7e-788d8067

    it's about an 80 meg file which sounds about right. However, Quicktime can't open it. Is there anything I can do to recover the file? Thanks.
     
  2. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #2
    There are only two way I could see to recover this file.
    Remove it from the trash and rename it something.mov. That might work.

    Second, if that doesn’t work. Rename the file something.raw and then import it into a program like Audacity. I don't know what format you were recording the pod cast in. If it was a download, you weren't using QT, but rather a browser or iTunes. [EDIT-reread you post. I made some poor asumptions]If you were recording a stream, then You might be able to salvage the data. RAW file format, at least in audio, contains no envelope, no header or information about recording rate, handedness, and the like. If you see a good waveform, but the audio is bad, you just need to set the recording rate, number of tracks, etc... RAW is the most basic file format and is really nothing more than a bin file. Once you get it working right, you can export it to the file format of your choice.

    Hope one of these two methods work for you.

    As far as resolving crashes, What version of QT are you using? Are you using audio routing software? If so what? How much memory and disk space do you have? What version of OS X are you using? What are you doing when it crashes?
     
  3. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #3
    Some suggestions: I like QT Pro, and use it. It is the fundamental backbone of Apple's media applications, like FCP as well as a really good stand alone media engine. It does have it's problems. Take a look at an alternative
    ultra simple recording app namedAudio Recorder.app- It has some other features, like recording on a schedule It also has a clip warning. Another free recording app is Audacity- Free/open source cross platform audio editor For a free product, it really is good. Add the LAME plug-in for MP3 conversion. It is VST and has limited NYQUIST(named in honor of the man) plug-in compatibilities. There are at least a few hundred plug-ins that it can use-so have at. It was programmed in JAVA and is open source, so the code is not completely optimized. In short, a lot of overkill and a bit slow at times, can crash (on intense processing of very large files), but is a good FREE program.

    In the short term, recording at a reduced fidelity might help with the crashes. In the short term, recording at a reduced fidelity might help with the crashes. See below.

    I work with spoken word. If you use "The Nyquist" theorem and a little common sense, you can shrink down your audio recordings before doing any processing. You can record decent audio at 22,050hz instead of 44,100hz, and in mono, and still cover the entire spectrum of normal spoken voice. Then you can down sample and compress to your hearts desire. If you mixing in audio in real time, or don't want to uprez (resample) your recording to match your music clips, then don't go down this path. If your equipment is old, if hd space or memory is very limited, if you don’t have a lot of bandwidth to share your podcast, then this might be the path to go down. Ask your self, do you really need a stereo feed for your voice. On the other hand, if music or dynamic audio range are a necessity, or if you just have to have acustic depth, then just forget this whole recording at a diminished rate.

    As this second post is really over kill, perhaps some podcasters can offer some advice.

    If you interested in audio apps for OS X then here is a GIANT list of them.
     

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